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Michael Haller
01-29-2006, 04:34 AM
I have a great idea - let's do a thread with newspaper/internet articles about tennis players being praised for being classy persons.

I'll have a start with this one:

A Tribute To A Living Legend by Michael Cecilio
Bidding Adieu to Fraulein Forehand, August 17, 1999
"It was only a matter of time before the legend, Steffi Graf, would hang up her racquets forgood. Not because of injuries, or health problems, or off-court woes, or even a departure in form. No, Steffi Graf has chosen to end her illustrious career on her own terms, basing her decision on a lack of motivation. One cannot blame the champion for feeling such a lack of motivation, playing week-in and week-out, travelling incessantly to all stops on the globe. And to do so for 17 years must really take its toll. Add to this the fact that Steffi Graf has achieved everything there is to achieve in tennis, perhaps even twice over. Steffi has nothing left to prove, nothing left to gun for – she’s been there, done that. But perhaps her greatest reason for leaving the tour is not that she has simply achieved everything in tennis, but that she has achieved greatness even at the end of her career. Now there really is nothing for Steffi to prove! She has seen the WTA tour go through many changes, and many generations, and still rank at the top of the game! From deposing Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert in the 1980’s, to battling for supremacy with Monica Seles and Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario in the early 1990’s, to fending off serious challenges in Martina Hingis, Lindsay Davenport and Venus Williams today, Steffi has been able to maintain her longevity for almost twenty years, and remain at the top of the game throughout. It all began for Steffi as a young thirteen year old who was quiet and somewhat reclusive, letting her tennis racquet do most of her talking. As it turned out, it would be these characteristics which heavily defined Steffi’s personality throughout her career up until the very end. As quiet as she was off the court, on the court, she was explosive. Tracy Austin, a former world #1, played Steffi in what was Graf’s professional debut match, and noted that she was a girl who hit the ball so incredibly hard. What is remarkable is the fact that with the constant evolution of the WTA tour, notably the change of the physical stature of the players and the firepower with which they hit the ball, Steffi was still able to hit it with the best of them. In the 80’s, Steffi could matched Martina Navratilova for physical endurance, and in the early 90’s Seles matched her with pure firepower. Just for good measure, to show that she too could remain a force almost twenty years into her career, she has consistently beaten a lot of the younger, hard-hitting players of today such as Lindsay Davenport and Venus Williams. Unlike Martina Hingis and Monica Seles, Steffi Graf did not achieve greatness until after her teen years. She won her first Grand Slam title at the age of 19, three years older than that of Seles and Hingis. But ever since, she has been a force to be reckoned with. The following year after her first major title, she went on to blitz the tour by winning ALL four grand slam trophies in 1988. And don’t forget her gold medal win at the Seoul Olympic Games which gave
her the recognition of the golden grand slam! ...
1997 was the year which saw Steffi Graf take an eight month absence from the tour because of a recurring knee injury which required surgery and rehabilitation. During this time, Martina Hingis was clearly dominating the field, winning the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open, coming ever so close to achieving what Graf achieved in 1988 – the Grand Slam. A lot of people questioned the legitimacy of Hingis’s clear-cut reign at the top. Hingis seemed to benefit from Graf’s sidelining, Seles’s off-court traumas regarding her father’s illness, and the under-development of Lindsay Davenport and the Williams sisters at that time.

She would return to the tour in mid 1998, however she would find herself losing to a lot of players she used to just hit off the court. It was a trying time for Steffi, who could never be happy with less than perfection. Working her way back to form, Steffi would finally get her just desserts when she slaughtered the field during the indoor carpet season, winning back-to-back titles at Leipzig and Philadelphia (the first time she won tournaments as an unseeded player), and reaching the semi finals of the season-ending Chase Championships. She would finish the year ranked #9, having defeated four of the top 6 players in the world (Lindsay Davenport, Martina Hingis, Jana Novotna and Monica Seles) in a period of two weeks. Enter 1999 – the year of triumph. As much as this year will be remembered as her final year on the tour, it will also be remembered as the scene of her greatest triumph. Enter the French Open – where it all began for Steffi and where it all ended. Just prior to the French Open, Steffi was coming off an injury which left her unable to play as many lead up claycourt tournaments as she would have liked. The claycourt tournament which she did play – the German Open – saw her struggle with her form as she bowed out to a player she had beaten all of nine times (Julie Halard-Decugis). Graf had a pretty easy road to the second week, but met her match in teen starlet Anna Kournikova. Anna’s lack of experience against the veteran showed as she was unable to convert on three set points in the second set, eventually losing the second set and the match in a tiebreak. Graf clearly outplayed 2nd ranked Lindsay Davenport in the quarter finals, with Lindsay doing all she could to hang on in a three set battle. The semi finals pitted Graf against her long-time nemesis, 3rd seed Monica Seles. It was a battle which had all the class of two veterans and all the heart of two great competitors. It also showcased some brilliant tennis, with Graf winning in an epic struggle 6-4 in the third.
But the championship match was a thriller! Martina Hingis, much to the piquedness of the French crowd, had reached the final stage and was playing for her first French Open trophy. Thankfully, they had Graf to cheer for.
It was a fantastic battle to begin with, with some near perfect tennis from both sides on full display. In the course of the match, it seemed clear that Hingis was disturbed by several line calls. But the explosion began in the beginning of the second set, Hingis with a substantial lead over her opponent, began her display of petulance…….

And with all the class and professionalism of a veteran champion, Miss Steffi Graf won her sixth and final French Open title, out-poising her younger, brasher, and more fragile opponent for the Grand Slam championship. Two weeks later, she would repeat the glory and reach the Wimbledon final. Along the way she would defeat Venus Williams in a memorable and entertaining three set quarter final, and Mirjana Lucic who gave Steffi a host of problems in the semis. She would not end her Wimbledon career as the champion, but undoubtedly she will
long be remembered as the ultimate champion of the grass court major. Steffi Graf – a legend, a champion, a professional, and a winner. With her lethal forehand, her troublesome slice backhand, her devastating serve, Steffi could blow away any opponent on the court. With her champion’s mettle, her undeniable heart, and sheer will to win, she could win any major championship in any given era against many different players. While we are sad to see her depart the tour, we will long remember the player who gave us such excitement, such passion and such joy in watching her play. We commend her on such a fine career, and wish her the best of luck in her future endeavours.
Thank you for the memories."

Grafrules
02-05-2006, 02:58 PM
Considering that today's women's tennis has not a lot of depth and lacks strength especially at the top she could pull it of as well, .....

Grigollif1
02-05-2006, 03:14 PM
I have a great idea - let's do a thread with newspaper/internet articles about tennis players being praised for being classy persons.

I'll have a start with this one:

A Tribute To A Living Legend by Michael Cecilio
Bidding Adieu to Fraulein Forehand, August 17, 1999
"It was only a matter of time before the legend, Steffi Graf, would hang up her racquets forgood. Not because of injuries, or health problems, or off-court woes, or even a departure in form. No, Steffi Graf has chosen to end her illustrious career on her own terms, basing her decision on a lack of motivation. One cannot blame the champion for feeling such a lack of motivation, playing week-in and week-out, travelling incessantly to all stops on the globe. And to do so for 17 years must really take its toll. Add to this the fact that Steffi Graf has achieved everything there is to achieve in tennis, perhaps even twice over. Steffi has nothing left to prove, nothing left to gun for – she’s been there, done that. But perhaps her greatest reason for leaving the tour is not that she has simply achieved everything in tennis, but that she has achieved greatness even at the end of her career. Now there really is nothing for Steffi to prove! She has seen the WTA tour go through many changes, and many generations, and still rank at the top of the game! From deposing Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert in the 1980’s, to battling for supremacy with Monica Seles and Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario in the early 1990’s, to fending off serious challenges in Martina Hingis, Lindsay Davenport and Venus Williams today, Steffi has been able to maintain her longevity for almost twenty years, and remain at the top of the game throughout. It all began for Steffi as a young thirteen year old who was quiet and somewhat reclusive, letting her tennis racquet do most of her talking. As it turned out, it would be these characteristics which heavily defined Steffi’s personality throughout her career up until the very end. As quiet as she was off the court, on the court, she was explosive. Tracy Austin, a former world #1, played Steffi in what was Graf’s professional debut match, and noted that she was a girl who hit the ball so incredibly hard. What is remarkable is the fact that with the constant evolution of the WTA tour, notably the change of the physical stature of the players and the firepower with which they hit the ball, Steffi was still able to hit it with the best of them. In the 80’s, Steffi could matched Martina Navratilova for physical endurance, and in the early 90’s Seles matched her with pure firepower. Just for good measure, to show that she too could remain a force almost twenty years into her career, she has consistently beaten a lot of the younger, hard-hitting players of today such as Lindsay Davenport and Venus Williams. Unlike Martina Hingis and Monica Seles, Steffi Graf did not achieve greatness until after her teen years. She won her first Grand Slam title at the age of 19, three years older than that of Seles and Hingis. But ever since, she has been a force to be reckoned with. The following year after her first major title, she went on to blitz the tour by winning ALL four grand slam trophies in 1988. And don’t forget her gold medal win at the Seoul Olympic Games which gave
her the recognition of the golden grand slam! ...
1997 was the year which saw Steffi Graf take an eight month absence from the tour because of a recurring knee injury which required surgery and rehabilitation. During this time, Martina Hingis was clearly dominating the field, winning the Australian Open, Wimbledon and the US Open, coming ever so close to achieving what Graf achieved in 1988 – the Grand Slam. A lot of people questioned the legitimacy of Hingis’s clear-cut reign at the top. Hingis seemed to benefit from Graf’s sidelining, Seles’s off-court traumas regarding her father’s illness, and the under-development of Lindsay Davenport and the Williams sisters at that time.

She would return to the tour in mid 1998, however she would find herself losing to a lot of players she used to just hit off the court. It was a trying time for Steffi, who could never be happy with less than perfection. Working her way back to form, Steffi would finally get her just desserts when she slaughtered the field during the indoor carpet season, winning back-to-back titles at Leipzig and Philadelphia (the first time she won tournaments as an unseeded player), and reaching the semi finals of the season-ending Chase Championships. She would finish the year ranked #9, having defeated four of the top 6 players in the world (Lindsay Davenport, Martina Hingis, Jana Novotna and Monica Seles) in a period of two weeks. Enter 1999 – the year of triumph. As much as this year will be remembered as her final year on the tour, it will also be remembered as the scene of her greatest triumph. Enter the French Open – where it all began for Steffi and where it all ended. Just prior to the French Open, Steffi was coming off an injury which left her unable to play as many lead up claycourt tournaments as she would have liked. The claycourt tournament which she did play – the German Open – saw her struggle with her form as she bowed out to a player she had beaten all of nine times (Julie Halard-Decugis). Graf had a pretty easy road to the second week, but met her match in teen starlet Anna Kournikova. Anna’s lack of experience against the veteran showed as she was unable to convert on three set points in the second set, eventually losing the second set and the match in a tiebreak. Graf clearly outplayed 2nd ranked Lindsay Davenport in the quarter finals, with Lindsay doing all she could to hang on in a three set battle. The semi finals pitted Graf against her long-time nemesis, 3rd seed Monica Seles. It was a battle which had all the class of two veterans and all the heart of two great competitors. It also showcased some brilliant tennis, with Graf winning in an epic struggle 6-4 in the third.
But the championship match was a thriller! Martina Hingis, much to the piquedness of the French crowd, had reached the final stage and was playing for her first French Open trophy. Thankfully, they had Graf to cheer for.
It was a fantastic battle to begin with, with some near perfect tennis from both sides on full display. In the course of the match, it seemed clear that Hingis was disturbed by several line calls. But the explosion began in the beginning of the second set, Hingis with a substantial lead over her opponent, began her display of petulance…….

And with all the class and professionalism of a veteran champion, Miss Steffi Graf won her sixth and final French Open title, out-poising her younger, brasher, and more fragile opponent for the Grand Slam championship. Two weeks later, she would repeat the glory and reach the Wimbledon final. Along the way she would defeat Venus Williams in a memorable and entertaining three set quarter final, and Mirjana Lucic who gave Steffi a host of problems in the semis. She would not end her Wimbledon career as the champion, but undoubtedly she will
long be remembered as the ultimate champion of the grass court major. Steffi Graf – a legend, a champion, a professional, and a winner. With her lethal forehand, her troublesome slice backhand, her devastating serve, Steffi could blow away any opponent on the court. With her champion’s mettle, her undeniable heart, and sheer will to win, she could win any major championship in any given era against many different players. While we are sad to see her depart the tour, we will long remember the player who gave us such excitement, such passion and such joy in watching her play. We commend her on such a fine career, and wish her the best of luck in her future endeavours.
Thank you for the memories."



Not again, Come on Michael. Why don'y we talk about the present Tenis rather then the past all the time. Damn, I know Germany is not doing that great right now as they used to but still, Tommy haas Just won a Title. That is more interest then the old dead beat upl graf-seles feud.

Fee
02-05-2006, 03:39 PM
The only thing worse than a long, poorly formatted post is another post that quotes the long, poorly formatted post when it isn't necessary to make the point.

'Michael Haller' how 'bout we go with your original idea, but limit it to stories from the last 3 years only. You obviously are a very 'dedicated' fan of Steffi Graf, but your constant desire to litter this board with the same worn out subjects under your purported multiple screen names is tiresome.

Michael Haller
02-05-2006, 04:24 PM
The only thing worse than a long, poorly formatted post is another post that quotes the long, poorly formatted post when it isn't necessary to make the point.

'Michael Haller' how 'bout we go with your original idea, but limit it to stories from the last 3 years only. ....


OK.




TIME Magazine

October 11, 2004 | Vol. 164, No. 14

Love All


She gave up tennis but not the adoration of her fans. And she's still a champion to troubled kids around the world
BY URSULA SAUTTER | BONN


A few sports stars win something rarer than trophies or championships — an enduring place in the public's affections. Steffi Graf is one of them. She hung up her racket five years ago after winning an amazing 22 Grand Slam titles, but that doesn't mean she is any less busy or beloved. Married since 2001 to fellow tennis champ Andre Agassi, the seven-time Wimbledon winner devotes much of her time these days to son Jaden Gil, 3, and daughter Jaz, 1 — and much of the rest to kids far less fortunate than hers. Both in her native Germany and in projects in Kosovo, Mozambique and South Africa, a nonprofit founded by Graf helps thousands of kids traumatized by war, persecution, violence and exile. "I've always felt very protective of kids," says Graf, 35. "Maybe it will be able to change at least some children's lives for the better." It's a goal as powerful and direct as her approach to tennis, and to life.

In the 1990s, Graf got to know the work of psychiatrists at the Outpatient Clinic for Refugee Children and their Families at the University of Hamburg-Eppendorf. With them, she funded a charity called Children for Tomorrow in 1998. "[These children] have been overlooked for so long," she says. "So I thought I'd see if I can bring awareness to the subject, and maybe help on starting some projects." That work proved to be both satisfying and heartbreaking. Dropping in on the Cape Town project, for instance, she was moved by the children's cheerfulness in the face of misery. "These kids have nothing, they've been abused and abandoned and thrown on garbage heaps," Graf remembers. "And still they come to you and even have big smiles on their faces."

She brings to the task the same energy and concentration that once helped her dominate women's tennis like no player before or since. During her professional career, which started in 1982 and ended in 1999 after a long battle with injuries, the woman whom many Germans still fondly call Fräulein Forehand won an Olympic gold medal in Seoul in 1988 plus 106 other international singles tournaments. Martina Navratilova and Chris Evert may be ahead of her in total singles wins, but for her sheer persistence and dominance of her sport — she was ranked No. 1 for a record 377 weeks — many consider Graf the greatest female tennis player ever. "I love to work out, I love to run, to be physically challenged," she muses, "and tennis was perfect for that."

Other challenges came off court. In 1993, a disturbed Graf fan stabbed Monica Seles and professed to have done it for his idol; he was sentenced to two years' probation. Her father, Peter, who introduced her to the sport, was convicted of tax evasion in 1997. She refused to let these shocks interfere with her game or her drive. "There is a reason you go through different things in life, and they make you who you are," she says. "So I don't fight the tough times. I try to understand them, and I try to work through them." Her country has stuck by her. This spring, in a poll published by TV magazine tv14, Graf was voted "the Germans' greatest role model" for her trustworthiness and authenticity. "I've always wanted to see if I could make a difference in somebody else's life in a positive way," she says. Few would argue that she hasn't.

With reporting by Laura A. Locke/San Francisco

RogerRulez
02-05-2006, 04:48 PM
WTF! Another Graff thread! NOBODY CARES FAAAAG! She is RETIRED and was not the Best!

Go stab yourself !

Applez
02-05-2006, 04:54 PM
Poor Graf

Her name keeps getting tarnish by her lunatic fan

DashaandSafin
02-05-2006, 05:26 PM
Nobody cares for the last time. TW please make a Graf and Seles only thread to keep this garbage out of the pro player forums.

Michael Haller
02-05-2006, 05:26 PM
Poor Graf

Her name keeps getting tarnish by her lunatic fan


The Great Graf: A Career Retrospective
By David MacCarthy
Tennisweek 07/16/2004:

The night before Steffi Graf's induction into the International Tennis Hall of Fame in Newport, Rhode Island last weekend, Hall of Famer Chris Evert bestowed the grandest of titles on the 22-time Grand Slam champion.

"When someone asks me who was the greatest player I've ever seen in the last 25 years, I'd say Steffi Graf — with no hesitation," Evert said.

Evert's emphatic declaration summed up Graf's prominent place at the pinnacle of the game she dominated and supported a statement many of us have made since Graf retired from tennis in 1999: [/B]simply put, Steffi stands alone as the greatest female singles player of all-time.[/B]

Numbers (and Graf has so many in her favor) don’t begin to tell the whole story of Graf's achievements. It is only when you look at her incomparable record that the incredible legend is evident.

....

The 1993 season was marred by the tragic stabbing of Monica Seles in Hamburg on April 30th, 1993. What many fans don’t realize is that Graf was actually very close to Seles in the rankings at the time. In 1993, the WTA used a points averaging system to rank players. Following the Hamburg tournament (an event which Monica received her ranking average, which was more points than she could have earned had she won the tournament), Seles’ lead over Graf was still slim. Had Seles been able to play at the 1993 French Open, she would have had to surpass Steffi Graf’s performance at the event, or hope Steffi lost before she did, to maintain her No. 1 ranking.

Graf did win the French Open in 1993, and her appearance in the finals enabled her to move back to No. 1. At Wimbledon, Jana Novotna led Graf 4-1, 40-30 in the final set, but Steffi rallied to win 7-6, 1-6, 6-4 to win her third consecutive Wimbledon title (one of only 3 women in the Open era to win 3 consecutive titles). Steffi’s win at the U.S. Open in 1993 was her 14th career Grand Slam singles win. By the end of the 1993 season, Graf had registered 44 consecutive wins on the WTA Tour, which still ranks as one of the ten longest win streaks in the Open Era.

....

Her first appearance in a tournament in 1995 was the indoor event in Paris in February. There Graf won the tournament, whipping reigning Australian Open champ Mary Pierce in the finals 6-2, 6-2. Graf went on to win three more tournaments in the spring without losing a set. She extended her streak of straight wins to 23 when she stopped Gabriela Sabatini 6-0, 6-1 in the quarterfinals of the 1995 French Open. Conchita Martinez (who had been undefeated on clay that year) became the first player to win a set from Graf that year, but still fell 6-3 in the third in the semifinals. Graf defeated defending champion Sanchez-Vicario in the finals of the French Open 7-5, 4-6, 6-0, losing only six points in the third set, in perhaps Graf’s most perfect set of tennis played in a Grand Slam final in her career. Her fourth French title enabled Graf to move ahead of Sanchez-Vicario at No. 1, a position Steffi held until she relinquished it for good nearly two years later. At Wimbledon, Steffi and Arantxa renewed their rivalry in the finals and played one of the best matches in the history of the Championships. An extraordinary 11th game in the final set, with Arantxa serving a 32 point, 13 deuce game, saw Steffi hold off Arantxa eight times at game point. Graf served out the next game at love to win the match 4-6, 6-1, 7-5 and earn her sixth career Wimbledon title and extend her win streak for the year to 32 matches and six tournaments. It also marked the first time in modern tennis history a player was undefeated in tournament play through Wimbledon.

Monica Seles returned to tennis in August of 1995 after a 27-month absence. Co-ranked #1 with Graf, Seles reached the finals of the U.S. Open without losing a set. In the final, Steffi and Monica went head-to-head for the first time since the 1993 Australian Open final. Graf edged Seles in a first set tiebreak, dropped the second set 6-0, but rallied to take the final set 6-3 to win an intense battle with a fierce rival 7-6, 0-6, 6-3. The U.S. Open triumph was historic on many levels: it was her fourth Open crown and her 18th career Grand Slam title, equaling the number won by Navratilova and Evert. More importantly, Graf became the first, and is still the only, player to win each of the Grand Slam events four times. Steffi also became the only player to win every Grand Slam at least twice in two different decades. To end the 1995 season, Graf won the Corel WTA Championships in Madison Square Garden in 5 sets over Anke Huber, Graf’s 47th win in 49 matches for the year, a .959 winning percentage and the eighth best single season record in WTA history. Graf was also perfect in tournament finals in 1995, winning all nine she played.

Foot surgery in 1996 prevented Graf from playing at the Australian Open for the second year in a row. Steffi won her first two tournaments she played in 1996, including her fifth at the Lipton tournament, which was a record for any player until her husband Andre Agassi won his sixth title at the event (now known as the Nasdaq-100) in March 2003. At the ‘96 French Open, Graf easily advanced to the final without the loss of a set. She met Sanchez-Vicario for the third time in the championship match. After coming within three points of winning in straight sets, Graf lost a second set tiebreak, and fell behind 2-4 in the third. Sanchez-Vicario had two break points for a 5-2 lead, and to serve for the match. Arantxa did serve for the match at 5-4 and 7-6. Each time Graf broke back. Even though Steffi was within three points of losing, she overcame Sanchez-Vicario in 3 hours, 3 minutes 6-3, 6-7, 10-8, the longest French Open final ever in terms of match time. Steffi’s win at the French meant she had won at least one Grand Slam event every year for 10 consecutive years, a feat only surpassed by Chris Evert’s record of 13.

Graf lost only one set en route to her seventh career Wimbledon singles title, and her 100th career singles title. She had an easier time in ‘96, defeating Sanchez-Vicario for the second straight year, and fourth time in their last four Grand Slam final encounters. Graf’s French Open-Wimbledon combination win was the fourth time in her career she achieved this unique and challenging double, another feat no other player has equaled. Graf became the third woman (joining Maureen Connolly and Helen Wills Moody) to win the French Open and Wimbledon in consecutive years.
Unprecedented is the only word to describe Graf’s crowning achievement in 1996, a fifth U.S. Open title. Graf didn’t lose a set in the tournament, defeating Martina Hingis and Monica Seles in her final two matches. With her U.S. Open win, Steffi had swept the three Grand Slam events she played in for the second year in a row; she extended her unbeaten streak in Grand Slam play to 42 matches; she won her 21st career Grand Slam singles title; she captured Wimbledon and the U.S. Open in the same year for the fifth time, a feat no other player has ever matched. A winner at the French-Wimbledon-U.S. Open again, it marked the fourth time in her career she won those three majors in a single season, a feat no other player has accomplished more than twice.

....

In 1999, Steffi reached only one tournament final prior to the French Open, at the Indian Wells tournament, losing to Serena Williams. Earlier in the year at Sydney, Steffi defeated both Serena and Venus Williams at the same tournament, a feat that would prove difficult for all the women on tour but two players (Sanchez-Vicario and Hingis).

As the sixth seed, Steffi Graf faced a difficult draw at the French Open. First, Graf overcame 1998 U.S. Open champion and second seed Lindsay Davenport in the quarterfinals 6-1, 6-7, 6-3. In the semifinals Steffi rallied to beat third seed Monica Seles 6-7, 6-3, 6-4. The win was Graf’s 10th in 15 career meetings with Seles, and sixth in Grand Slam play. In the championship match, Steffi faced off against top-ranked Martina Hingis. In one of the most dramatic, come from behind victories the tournament has ever seen, Steffi rallied from 4-6, 4-5, 15-30 to win her sixth career French Open, 4-6, 7-5, 6-2. Graf was simply superior in the crunch against Hingis, refusing to lose and playing what might have been the most complete match of her career.

Her six French Open titles is second only to Evert’s seven, and gave Steffi a total of 107 career singles titles. The win also represented Graf’s 22 career Grand Slam singles title, most in the Open era, and second only to Margaret Court’s 24. Furthermore Graf defeated the top three ranked players in consecutive matches at a Grand Slam tournament, a feat no other player had ever done. Graf reached the final of Wimbledon in 1999 for the ninth time. She lost to Lindsay Davenport, but her final round appearance at Wimbledon was the eighth time in her career she appeared in a final at Roland Garros and Wimbledon in the same year, another feat no other player has come close to.

Steffi retired from her second round match against Amy Frazier at the 1999 San Diego tournament, and shortly thereafter Graf announced her permanent retirement from the sport. At the time of her retirement, Steffi was ranked No. 3, the highest ranking by anyone at the time of retirement.

Graf’s final career tally was 902 wins against only 115 defeats for a winning percentage of .887, 107 tournament titles, 22 Grand Slam singles title, the Olympic Gold medal, and 8 seasons ranked No. 1.

David MacCarthy is a freelance writer and tennis statistician, originally from New York and now based in the San Francisco Bay Area. He has been an enthusiastic tennis nut since the 1970s.

Rodeo
02-05-2006, 05:31 PM
Poor Graf

Her name keeps getting tarnish by her lunatic fan

poor her but true. Unlike Navratilova, Sampras, Evert and Federer, her career's most defining moment was what occured in Hamburg April 30th 1993.

Thanks to that psychotic fan. The looney actually took centerstage and became as famous as his idol.:D

Michael Haller
02-05-2006, 06:35 PM
poor her but true. Unlike Navratilova, Sampras, Evert and Federer, her career's most defining moment was what occured in Hamburg April 30th 1993....:D

Just read the Graf tributes from 1999 when she retired.
In most of them the stabbing isn't even mentioned.
In a few the stabbing is - but only as a footnote ....

Rodeo
02-05-2006, 06:39 PM
Just read the Graf tributes from 1999 when she retired.
In most of them the stabbing isn't even mentioned.
In a few the stabbing is - but only as a footnote ....

yes, that' why on her biggest tribute on espn century, the lunatic gunther again took centerstage. poor thing.:D

Michael Haller
02-05-2006, 06:44 PM
yes, that' why on her biggest tribute on espn century, the lunatic gunther again took centerstage. poor thing.:D



LOL!
ESPN is American, isn't it? And known for being extremely "patriotic", no?

Rodeo
02-05-2006, 06:46 PM
LOL!
ESPN is American, isn't it? And known for being extremely "patriotic", no?

patriotic? yes! was that the truth a big YES. poor thing. the lunatic is even more famous than her.:D

Michael Haller
02-05-2006, 07:12 PM
patriotic? yes! was that the truth a big YES. poor thing. the lunatic is even more famous than her.:D


I don't think so. Actually the stabbing is almost forgotten today. As Seles is.

BTW, the perp was SO lunatic that he thought Graf would NOT have regained her #1 spot without his help!

Michael Haller
02-05-2006, 07:13 PM
patriotic? yes! was that the truth a big YES. poor thing. the lunatic is even more famous than her.:D


I don't think so. Actually the stabbing is almost forgotten today. As Seles is.

BTW, the perp was SO lunatic that he thought Graf would NOT have regained her #1 spot without his help!

Nalbandian
02-05-2006, 07:21 PM
I don't think so. Actually the stabbing is almost forgotten today. As Seles is.

BTW, the perp was SO lunatic that he thought Graf would NOT have regained her #1 spot without his help!

Rodeo is right...He was SO lunatic like YOU....

HAlf of those 22 are known as the Gunther infected Slams...

That's why Martina Navratilova is the one and only recognized Greatest Female Tennis Player of All Time...

Live with it psycho...

darrinbaker00
02-05-2006, 08:05 PM
I don't think so. Actually the stabbing is almost forgotten today. As Seles is.
By whom? We know you remember it because YOU DID IT.
BTW, the perp was SO lunatic that he thought Graf would NOT have regained her #1 spot without his help!
You were right. Graf wouldn't have regained the #1 ranking if you hadn't stabbed Seles.