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View Full Version : Why don't the US ever use Crandon Park or Indian Wells for Davis Cup?


Californication
01-30-2006, 07:53 AM
While I understand the US/Romania Davis Cup tie won't be a huge draw and thus will be played in a stadium of 5,000, why don't the US consider using Crandon Park in Key Biscayne (Nasdaq-100 Open stadium) or the Indian Wells Tennis Garden (TMS Indian Wells stadium) for later Davis Cup rounds. There is great weather year round there, unlike Arthur Ashe in NY which would probably be the best place if it had a retractable roof, seeing as it is the USTA National Tennis Center. The stadiums are also two of the biggest tennis stadiums in the world, the Indian Wells stadium housing 16,000 and Crandon Park housing 14,000. For a semifinal or even a quarterfinal if we face Chile, I think we could get a lot of fans in there. It would be a great atmosphere with at least 12,000 fans screaming. That is what Davis Cup is about. Are either of these two sites being considered?

@wright
01-30-2006, 08:31 AM
I don't think stadium size is usually as much of a consideration as surface. Crandon park is too slow to help Americans enough against clay courters.

Fee
01-30-2006, 10:18 AM
Davis Cup venues are decided on by bids from the cities, usually put together by the facility, some sponsors, and the local USTA Chapter (or some other type of team). It's kind of hard to do because of the short notice, and also, once the opposing team is announced, PMac will say what type of surface he prefers and then they start looking for places that can provide that (such as Houston being able to put in a grass court faster and better than anyone else could at that time).

Indian Wells is probably too big for a Davis Cup tie. The USTA really doesn't like rows and rows of empty seats showing up on the TV broadcast. Of course this year that doesn't matter, since there won't be a TV broadcast...

Californication
01-30-2006, 10:29 AM
I don't think stadium size is usually as much of a consideration as surface. Crandon park is too slow to help Americans enough against clay courters.


Then again, they did use the Carson site for last year's tie with Croatia, and apparently those courts were very slow. And the Indian Wells site has very, very quick courts.

bigserving
01-30-2006, 10:49 AM
As usual, it comes down to money. The USTA took bids to host the Romanian tie from a number of different venues. With a particular facility hosting the event, the USTA is able to merely supervise the production and take in a nice fee.

The surface does not really matter because most can be put down relatively quickly. They once put down a clay court for an indoor tie in Chicago. Hard courts can be put down in a week or less with relatively little cost.

Weather is also a factor. The ATP has rules about required rest for players traveling to different continents and time zones. A couple of days of rain could impact other ATP events in around the world.

Most of the revenue, used to come from television. If the US gets to host a final against a country with poplular players, we might expect to see it played at a much larger venue and even perhaps be on network TV.

Moose Malloy
01-30-2006, 02:06 PM
davis cup isn't as popular as it used to be. when johnny mac played in the early 80s, many 15,000(they used Louis Armstrong Stadium at the US open one year!) plus venues were sold out very quickly.
no one cares about Roddick, Blake etc. They can barely drum up interest for a 5,000 stadium.

andfor
01-30-2006, 02:13 PM
Davis Cup venues are decided on by bids from the cities, usually put together by the facility, some sponsors, and the local USTA Chapter (or some other type of team). It's kind of hard to do because of the short notice, and also, once the opposing team is announced, PMac will say what type of surface he prefers and then they start looking for places that can provide that (such as Houston being able to put in a grass court faster and better than anyone else could at that time)....

I have personally spoke with two directors of two different facilites that either have hosted or have bid to host US Davis Cup matches. We talked about this very same thing. I can say Fee's assesments matches their explainations about why and why not to go after DC matches. End of story.