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View Full Version : Out before the squash. Shot Spot related.


Kobble
02-06-2006, 04:03 PM
I was thinking about when I saw a ball in slow motion hit the ground outside the line first, but squashed enough for the back of the ball to catch the line. How is that in? So, if I get a shot around the net post I should put the ball into a roll, if possible?

Now, Shot Spot takes the squash into consideration, and many ball have been called in by a mm. You know those balls are really out before the squash. Does the rule state that a ball can catch the line in any manner as long as it is on the first bounce? That would eliminate the roll strategy. Someone clarify this for me.

Rickson
02-06-2006, 04:12 PM
I was thinking about when I saw a ball in slow motion hit the ground outside the line first, but squashed enough for the back of the ball to catch the line. How is that in? So, if I get a shot around the net post I should put the ball into a roll, if possible?

Now, Shot Spot takes the squash into consideration, and many ball have been called in by a mm. You know those balls are really out before the squash. Does the rule state that a ball can catch the line in any manner as long as it is on the first bounce? That would eliminate the roll strategy. Someone clarify this for me.
No way! A ball that rolls in, but lands out initially is out.

JackRabbit
02-06-2006, 04:15 PM
It is nearly (if not completely) impossible to make the ball bounce off of your racquet and then roll when it hits the court. It will bounce just a little bit at the very least. This makes your point moot.

Max G.
02-06-2006, 04:30 PM
Well, according to current definitions of "ball landing somewhere" it would be in, I think. Currently, from what I can find in the rules of tennis, is a ball touches the ground within the courts before bouncing up, it is considered in, so the "rolling" thing would technically count as in.

Maybe. It's really hard to tell, since the rules weren't written with that question in mind...

However, there are two points to be made here:

1) It's almost certain to be physically impossible to make a tennis ball do that.
2) It's certainly NOT within the "spirit" of the rules, and if it became an issue then I'd guess that they'd put in a clause in the rules to deal with it.

But I think it'll never be an issue, because it's amost certain that a tennis ball will bounce at least a little bit at least once before rolling.

penpal
02-06-2006, 04:47 PM
FWIW, I'll take a possible 1 mm error over letting a human make a split-second decision on a ball traveling 50-80 mph and landing several yards away.

Shabazza
02-06-2006, 04:49 PM
I've never seen a ball actually roll before bouncing - is that even possible :confused:

matchpoint
02-06-2006, 05:11 PM
I was thinking about when I saw a ball in slow motion hit the ground outside the line first, but squashed enough for the back of the ball to catch the line. How is that in? So, if I get a shot around the net post I should put the ball into a roll, if possible?

Now, Shot Spot takes the squash into consideration, and many ball have been called in by a mm. You know those balls are really out before the squash. Does the rule state that a ball can catch the line in any manner as long as it is on the first bounce? That would eliminate the roll strategy. Someone clarify this for me.

The mark of the ball in a single bounce is what should be considered. Since the ball is round everybody knows that the area at the bottom is smaller than the middle part, the ball should be taken as whole as it lands, if any part of it touches the line it should be considered good.

Although your roll strategy is lacking in common sense and impossible to happen I might give you the point if you can do it.

superman1
02-06-2006, 06:05 PM
It does roll a bit as well as squash a bit, I believe.

Geezer Guy
02-07-2006, 11:12 AM
The ball IS going to skid and roll a bit, and if any part of the ball touches the line, however briefly, the ball should be considered IN (even if the ball first touches down out of bounds, and then skids in).

I'd say it would be pretty darn impossible to hit a ball with a racquet in such a way that it doesn't bounce, just rolls.

bigserving
02-07-2006, 02:12 PM
No way! A ball that rolls in, but lands out initially is out.

Correction, the ball is good.