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View Full Version : Your opportunity to ask Yeu-Tzuoo (Jimmy) Wang!


Lee
02-11-2006, 07:05 PM
At the SAP Open next week, I will have the opportunity to hang out with Yeu-Tzuoo (Jimmy) Wang, since I will be interviewing him and writing an article for Goldsea (check out the Kevin Kim article (http://goldsea.com/Personalities/Kimk/kimk1.html))

As of now, I am not yet sure about the format of my article, though I would love to write a lengthy, high-quality articles that incorporate some facts, some opinions and some Q&A, similar to those in Deuce magazine.

A little background on Jimmy: at age 20, he is the #2 Asian player in the world, trailing behind the 26-year-old Paradorn Srichaphan. Jimmy is currently ranked #79 in ATP, after scoring his first grandslam victory in Australia, a straight set win over Mariano Zabaleta. Considering that Scrichaphan (26 years old), Hyung-Taik Lee (30 years old), Takao Suzuki (29 years old) might have already past their primes, Jimmy is considered the most promising talent in Asia at the moment.

Last year, Jimmy broke into ATP 100 for the first time in his career and improved his year-end ranking for the fifth straight season. Jimmy has been playing predominately challengers and is looking to play full-time ATP circuit this season for the first time.

Here are some pictures of Jimmy from the OZ Open:

http://www.jasonderek.com/tennis/1137419486.jpg

http://www.jasonderek.com/tennis/1137419542.jpg

http://www.jasonderek.com/tennis/1137419563.jpg

Feel free to ask any question. I will compile a list and personally ask him all the questions and will do my best to incorporate them into my interview.

dtmmfam
02-11-2006, 07:59 PM
what is the tennis program like in taiwan? Is it easy for kids to pick up a racket and start playing tennis? For example, are there parks and facilities that give kids the opportunity to start learning the game?

West Coast Ace
02-11-2006, 08:20 PM
I have a few:

Why did he take up tennis? (pretty standard but sometimes there are interesting answers)
Does he have any expectations for this year? (e.g. set any ranking he'd like to get up to)
What's his favorite tour stop?
Which Slam would he most like to win?
Who was his favorite player growing up? (Chang?)
When does he think an Asian player (from Asia, not a US born Asian like Chang) win a Slam singles title? (man or woman)

nafsinnet
02-11-2006, 08:22 PM
Thanks for the opportunity - here are my questions:

"How much of your training took place in Taiwan, versus overseas?"

"If you received both training at home (Taiwan) and abroad, how would you compare the two?"

"Why aren't male Asian tennis players meeting with as much as success on the tour as their female counterparts?"

Lee
02-11-2006, 08:22 PM
I have a few:

When does he think an Asian player (from Asia, not a US born Asian like Chang) win a Slam singles title? (man or woman)


Man, I was going to ask him the exact same question!

Thanks for the input, guys!

Lee
02-11-2006, 08:24 PM
Thanks for the opportunity - here are my questions:

"How much of your training took place in Taiwan, versus overseas?"



As far as I know (not that I know anything), Jimmy trains predominately in Taipei and occasionally trains at Newk's in Texas. I will ask him for sure though!

ACE of Hearts
02-11-2006, 08:26 PM
Which player he hasnt faced yet, would he like to play?

dtmmfam
02-11-2006, 08:30 PM
which parts of your game are you trying to improve now?
pepsi or coke?

aznkb888
02-11-2006, 08:47 PM
strings? tension? paintjob? any customizations to the racquet?

goober
02-11-2006, 08:52 PM
How about some non-tennis questions

Where are his favorite places to eat. Does he like any non-Chinese food?

GF? details :)

What does he do when he is not playing tennis or training. Are most of his friends tennis players or are what kind of people does he hang out with?

Why didn't his parents try to make him a doctor or engineer- j/k lol

Lee
02-11-2006, 08:55 PM
How about some non-tennis questions

Where are his favorite places to eat. Does he like any non-Chinese food?

GF? details :)

What does he do when he is not playing tennis or training. Are most of his friends tennis players or are what kind of people does he hang out with?

Why didn't his parents try to make him a doctor or engineer- j/k lol



Goober,
I have heard that he is dating Na Li of China, but of course this is just a rumor. I will try my best to get some details.

His mom is a doctor :)

I will ask him all of the questions for you, don't worry!

Lee
02-11-2006, 08:59 PM
http://www.jasonderek.com/tennis/56630790.jpg

Jimmy & Na

West Coast Ace
02-11-2006, 09:04 PM
I'd stay away from the personal questions - unless you want the interview to end quickly and have any hopes of more interviews with pros.

The 'paintjob' question - or any others that might require him to say something unfavorable about his sponsors - probably aren't a good idea either.

goober
02-11-2006, 09:21 PM
I'd stay away from the personal questions - unless you want the interview to end quickly and have any hopes of more interviews with pros.


Well kevin kim was singing like a bird in the other goldsea article. I think a good interviewer will know how far he can take a personal question by the players response to his questioning. I am sure Jimmy won't mind talking a bunch because he doesn't get interviewed very often if at all by the Western Media. Plus Lee is Taiwanese if I am not mistaken, so he will most likely feel at ease and probably open up more than he would otherwise with a regular American interviewer. So don't hold back Lee get all the dirt and details! :D

MasterTS
02-11-2006, 09:30 PM
Please ask him how it feels to lose all the time.

goober
02-11-2006, 09:37 PM
Please ask him how it feels to lose all the time.

he finished with a 30-12 record in challengers last year.

Lee
02-11-2006, 09:47 PM
Well kevin kim was singing like a bird in the other goldsea article. I think a good interviewer will know how far he can take a personal question by the players response to his questioning. I am sure Jimmy won't mind talking a bunch because he doesn't get interviewed very often if at all by the Western Media. Plus Lee is Taiwanese if I am not mistaken, so he will most likely feel at ease and probably open up more than he would otherwise with a regular American interviewer. So don't hold back Lee get all the dirt and details! :D


Yeah, well, I am going to conduct the interview in Mandarin/Taiwanese, since it is the language that he is most comfortable with. With that said, I think (and hope) he will have a good time during his stay in San Jose next week.

However, I am worried about his fitness, since he played Davis Cup matches on Friday, Saturday (5-set marathon) and Sunday, not to mention he had a minor surgery on his right toe on last week. Getting a tough draw (Blake in the first round, Fish/Murray in the second round) does not help, either.

Hopefully he's well-rested and plays good tennis on Tuesday night.

MasterTS
02-11-2006, 10:07 PM
he finished with a 30-12 record in challengers last year.

He lost 12 times to challengers? lol... There's a reason they dont televise highschool football games...

goober
02-11-2006, 10:21 PM
He lost 12 times to challengers? lol... There's a reason they dont televise highschool football games...

lol I guess you don't know much about tennis. First you make a comment about him losing all the time and you don't even know his record. IF you win >70% matches it is pretty stupid to ask somebody how does it feel to lose all the time.

Equating Challengers to high school football is not even close. Most players in challengers in the main draw are ranked between top 100 to 300. If you want a football analogy- Challengers are above NCAA D1 football but below the NFL- probably closer to the CFL.

tandayu
02-11-2006, 10:32 PM
Lee, I will be very interested in reading it. He is one of the most improved Asian based player. It is interesting now that Thailand, S. Korea, India, Taiwan, Uzbeskistan, Japan has several ranked ATP & WTA players.

Ask him about the quality and development of the Asian based tennis coaches in generating more quality Asian based player?

Matt Riordan
02-11-2006, 10:36 PM
How much is a pint of milk?

MasterTS
02-11-2006, 10:41 PM
lol I guess you don't know much about tennis. First you make a comment about him losing all the time and you don't even know his record. IF you win >70% matches it is pretty stupid to ask somebody how does it feel to lose all the time.

Equating Challengers to high school football is not even close. Most players in challengers in the main draw are ranked between top 100 to 300. If you want a football analogy- Challengers are above NCAA D1 football but below the NFL- probably closer to the CFL.

I follow tennis ATP, WTA, challengers and FU tennis very closely mainly because I put lots of $$$ in gambling their results. Trust me, Wang is a loser and won't ever break into real ATP tennis. He's record is 15-17 and his been a pro since 2001.. that gives him 5 years of tennis play and he accumulated a total of 32 ATP tennis matches... bravo!.. i dont care about his challengers record.. look who plays challengers???? In 2005 lost to bursmuller, moodie, korolev, berrer, portas (the kid), behrend, and a buncha other no namers that will hang around the CH and FU circuit for the rest of their carreers.. Hi thomas zib, who also beat wang last year!

Onion
02-11-2006, 10:43 PM
Ask him if he knows about Babolat's conspiracy against him thus giving him inferior, poorly weighted & balanced racquets. http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=83394

:)

Roddick played challenger events in 2001. James Blake played some in 2002. Ginepri in 2003. Andre Agassi even played some when he started his resurection from #141 in the world. Challenger events have some of the World's best players in them.

MasterTS
02-11-2006, 10:44 PM
Ask him if he knows about Babolat's conspiracy against him thus giving him inferior, poorly weighted & balanced racquets. http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=83394

:)

Roddick played challenger events in 2001. James Blake played some in 2002. Ginepri in 2003. Andre Agassi even played some when he started his resurection from #141 in the world. Challenger events have some of the World's best players in them.

Of course everyone plays challenger events.. the point is to get some practice and move on to the real deal!.. Wang seems to have 32 career atp matches in 5 years.. he is living the challenger and FU's dream!

Lee
02-11-2006, 10:50 PM
Well, my friend, Jimmy turned pro in '01, when he was 16 years old. He was trying to move up in the ranking and he thought the best way to do so was to play in the challengers.

Unlike Monfils, Young and Gasquet, Jimmy did not get too many ATP wildcard invites, and as you probably know, it takes a lot out of you to play 3 rounds of grueling qualifying matches.

I believe in Jimmy and I think he has a shot to carry Taiwanese (and Asian) tennis into another level. He is young, has potentials and hard working, so why don't you give him a chance?

jeebeesus
02-11-2006, 10:55 PM
Who`s the other Taiwanese guy. Seems to be better than Wang. And i used to see some good juniors too but they petered out in the seniors.Ask him about the new juniors who`s got potential.

aznkb888
02-11-2006, 10:59 PM
I follow tennis ATP, WTA, challengers and FU tennis very closely mainly because I put lots of $$$ in gambling their results. Trust me, Wang is a loser and won't ever break into real ATP tennis. He's record is 15-17 and his been a pro since 2001.. that gives him 5 years of tennis play and he accumulated a total of 32 ATP tennis matches... bravo!.. i dont care about his challengers record.. look who plays challengers???? In 2005 lost to bursmuller, moodie, korolev, berrer, portas (the kid), behrend, and a buncha other no namers that will hang around the CH and FU circuit for the rest of their carreers.. Hi thomas zib, who also beat wang last year!

so playing 3 ATP level tournaments so far this year isn't "real" ATP tennis? playing in a grand slam isn't ATP level tennis? give the kid a freaking break. he's just turned 21!

MasterTS
02-11-2006, 10:59 PM
Well, my friend, Jimmy turned pro in '01, when he was 16 years old. He was trying to move up in the ranking and he thought the best way to do so was to play in the challengers.

Unlike Monfils, Young and Gasquet, Jimmy did not get too many ATP wildcard invites, and as you probably know, it takes a lot out of you to play 3 rounds of grueling qualifying matches.

I believe in Jimmy and I think he has a shot to carry Taiwanese (and Asian) tennis into another level. He is young, has potentials and hard working, so why don't you give him a chance?

Maybe I will give him a chance! Lets see what this kid's got, see what he can do in 2006... :mrgreen:

MasterTS
02-11-2006, 11:01 PM
so playing 3 ATP level tournaments in a year isn't "real" ATP tennis? playing in a grand slam isn't ATP level tennis? you want to talk about a loser. look in the mirror. gambling on tennis is lame.

Gambling on tennis is coolio because it's so easy to make $$$$... a lot more predictable results and easy income.. you think getting extra $$$ is lame? lol

As for your grand slam response.. look at alex bogo jr... he's been in 10 slams and finally made it past the first round this year at AO.. do I consider him a real tennis player? not really... he's a challenger level circuit player, not an ATP circuit level player.

aznkb888
02-11-2006, 11:06 PM
well if there's idiots out there who're willing to give you money for betting on tennis i guess more power to you...

point was to not bash on the guy cuz he's been steadily improving. and he's basically one of the few asian hopes in tennis. i guess i'm slightly biased as i'm taiwanese as well and would like to see the guy do well...

MasterTS
02-11-2006, 11:14 PM
well if there's idiots out there who're willing to give you money for betting on tennis i guess more power to you...

point was to not bash on the guy cuz he's been steadily improving. and he's basically one of the few asian hopes in tennis. i guess i'm slightly biased as i'm taiwanese as well and would like to see the guy do well...

You don't gamble against other people! Theres vegas, theres other bookies like the online ones and so forth.

Lee
02-11-2006, 11:16 PM
Who`s the other Taiwanese guy. Seems to be better than Wang. And i used to see some good juniors too but they petered out in the seniors.Ask him about the new juniors who`s got potential.


The other Taiwanese guy is Rendy Lu (his chinese name is Yen-Hsun).

Jimmy ranked higher (Year end ITF #5 in 2001) than Rendy (ITF #29) when they were Juniors, and in ATP currently. I think Rendy is in the high 100s

aznkb888
02-11-2006, 11:38 PM
Rendy is 135 in the rollover rankings...107 in the race according to itftennis.com...

rfprse
02-11-2006, 11:47 PM
What's up with the name "Jimmy"? How did he come up with it? Is it a common practice in Taiwan?

Lee
02-12-2006, 01:48 AM
Davis Cup Update:

Taiwan 3, Pakistan 2

Jimmy carried the team, winning both singles rubber (#1 and #4) but it was Ti Chen who won the decisive rubber.

This Davis Cup victory will definately boost Jimmy's morale and I certainly hope he can keep up with the winning form until next week!

goober
02-12-2006, 09:33 AM
I follow tennis ATP, WTA, challengers and FU tennis very closely mainly because I put lots of $$$ in gambling their results. Trust me, Wang is a loser and won't ever break into real ATP tennis. He's record is 15-17 and his been a pro since 2001.. that gives him 5 years of tennis play and he accumulated a total of 32 ATP tennis matches... bravo!.. i dont care about his challengers record.. look who plays challengers???? In 2005 lost to bursmuller, moodie, korolev, berrer, portas (the kid), behrend, and a buncha other no namers that will hang around the CH and FU circuit for the rest of their carreers.. Hi thomas zib, who also beat wang last year!


What do you consider real ATP tennis? Calling somebody a loser who is ranked #79 in the world at age 20 is pretty amazing considering the 1000s of pros who never make a top 100 ranking. Given his age I would say there is a very good chance that he will break into the top 50 this year or next. Do you consider real ATP tennis only those in the top 20? Wang beat Tommy Haas last year and played Roddick very close on grass. Anyone who is ranked in the top 100 is not a loser in my book. Are you ranked in the top 100 in the world in anything? I didn't think so...

West Coast Ace
02-12-2006, 10:05 AM
goober, how did a Hall of Famer, with your rep on this board, get caught up in a debate with an obvious troll? Bedridden with the flu? Snowed in? Bored?

goober
02-12-2006, 10:16 AM
goober, how did a Hall of Famer, with your rep on this board, get caught up in a debate with an obvious troll? Bedridden with the flu? Snowed in? Bored?

I should know better but lately I have been in a ****y mood.

brtennis
02-12-2006, 11:09 AM
Please ask him some financial aspects of playing abroad. How much per year does one need to travel around the globe? Any financial support he is getting besides his parents? Any coach traveling with him?....etc

rilokiley
02-12-2006, 07:41 PM
One thing that I learned from the business world is that one needs to deal with all types of individuals.
One thing that I learned from the business world is that one needs to be an *** like Dave here to survive.

:D
I'm bored.
Hey, Jason!

sureshs
02-12-2006, 07:50 PM
Nice try, but that argument doesn't hold any weight and I'll tell you why. Technically, Bagdatis is a Caucasian. So are all the Russian players with bragging rights. I can assure you none of the fans going crazy for these players are doing so because of their Caucasian heritage, unless maybe some of them are Neo N-a-z-i's

Notice how Jimmy Wang, a Taiwanese National, is refered to as an "Asian". Not Taiwanese or Chinese, but Asian. That makes this a racial issue, pure and simple. Goldensea.com is an exculsive Asian-only magazine. Just imagine if there was a magazine called WhiteSea that only focused on Caucasian people. Wouldn't that be racist?

You refer to Jimmy Wang as one of the last great "Asian hopes" in tennis. Huh? Why would you even need to hope for an Asian? Can you not enjoy tennis unless Asians are involved? Is Kevin Kim an American hope or an Asian hope? Hmmmm....

The bottom line is that you're getting all excited because some obscure player won a few challengers and broke the top 100. Big deal! The only reason you care is because he's Asian. That is racial and racist.

I think you have misunderstood. The term Asian, at least in tennis, is not used in the sense you think. It has been pointed out several times by US commentators that Paradorn Srichaphan (Thailand) has been the highest ranked Asian (#11 ?) since Vijay Amritraj (from India, now stays in the US) who was #15. Ramesh Krishnan (#21) and his father Ramanthan Krishnan (unofficial #3 before the Open Era) are also mentioned. Paradorn and {Vijay,Ramesh,Ramanathan} are not of the same race.

In the same vein, the AO is now called "Grand Slam of the Asia-Pacific" but it is held in Australia as you know, which is not an Asian country.

Likewise, the "Asian Games" (which is like the Olympics over there) is based on geography, not race.

And when the Chinese women won the AO doubles, the news was always about "China's first slam" not "Asia's first slam".

jeebeesus
02-12-2006, 08:48 PM
And isn`t this thread about an oportunity to ask Wang questions ? Would the interest not be the same if i was to meet Roddick tomorrow and invite you guys to ask questions? Sheeeesh!!!!

el_profe
02-12-2006, 10:22 PM
ask him :
1.why Yen-Hsun Lu did not play davis cup this week?
2. if he was "ticked off" or not happy that he didnt play, especially when they won 3-2 and had a tough 5 set doubles match.
3. Also does he know if Yen-Hsun LU will play against korea when they really need him?
4. What does he think of the taiwan-China conflict, and is he proud of the fact that the chinese goverment has poured money into tennis and have yet to develop a top 300 player, yet little taiwan already has a top 100 and another player close to being in the top 100.
Finally,
5. Favorite and least favorite surface to play on.

thanks

ps. One more, who is the most hated player in tennis, top 100, it could be someone he does not know but is hated by everyone... I would bet its Coria. And koeller if we are talking outside top 100.

Lee
02-12-2006, 10:36 PM
Yeah, Rendy (Yen-Hsun) Lu decided to skip Davis Cup and play at a challenger event in Australia instead. He won the doubles and lost the singles in the quarterfinals.

Press in Taiwan calls Rendy unpatrotic and selfish, and while words haven't come out from the Rendy camp, a lot of fans are defending Rendy's position as well. Check out this article, by Luke Sebatier, who is an accomplished reporter in Taiwan:





Media off base in pointing finger at Lu

2006.02.12
By LUKE SABATIER
CONTRIBUTING WRITER



Lu Yen-Hsun’s absence ftom this weekend’s Davis Cup tie has drawn nearly as much attention as the event itself.

The Min sheng Daily especially has been on a crusade to cast Lu as an unpatriotic villain who has thumbed his nose at his country,in contrast to the fine spirit shown by Wang Yeu-tzuoo who’s playing despite having corns removed from each of his big toes as recently as Monday.

In a commentary on Wang published yesterday, the newspaper concluded: ”Just three days after having a procedure done to remove corns from his feet, Wang Yeu-tzuoo has joined the lineup to play two singles matches and the doubles. That’s in contrast to Lu Yen-hsun who ‘hung a sign out’s saying he was unwilling to fight, making Wang’s participation even more commendable. If Wang can lead the team to victory, it will only increase the estimation local tennis circles have for him.

I have plenty of admiration for Wang. He is highly talented, and finally seems to have realized that talend alone is not sufficient to cut it on the pro circuit. He truly deserves full credit for playing in this tie. I also wish Lu were here this weekend. But anybody who wants to question Lu’s patriotism or interest in playing Davis Cup has a woefully short memory.

This is a guy who nearly sacrificed his 2003 season—and even his career—by playing in perhaps the most important Davis Cup tie in Taiwan’s history with a bum shoulder.

In April 2003, Taiwan faced rival China in Wuxi. The winner would likely be promoted to Asia-Oceania Zone Group 1, just one step under the Davis Cup World Group, and emerge as a serious contender in Asia.

Lu won the opening singles of the tie in five sets, breaking his opponent in the final game. Had he lost that game, Lu said later, he wouldn’t have been able to win another service game.

A day later, Lu teamed with Wang to take the doubles, despite suffering severe pain. Wang, who lost his first single, won the Sunday rubber match for a dramatic 3-2 win. Taiwan had a glorious victory, but Lu was sidelined for nearly six months, and almost decided to quit the game, so despondent was he over his shoulder and other injuries. And although Wang clinched the final point in last year’s 3-2 win over Japan, Lu did the heavy lifting with two singles wins.

Missing the point
So, sorry, but I don’t buy the Lu as villain line, and painting this as a Lu vs. Wang story totally misses the point.

The local press would be better off directing its venom at the local tennis community, which handled this tie in truly haphazard fashion.
After the 2006 Davis Cup draw was set last October, the Chinese Taipei Tennis Association sent a fax to Lu’s camp. “Sign it and return it by December 10 if you want to play,” the association stated, according to people close to Lu. “If we don’t hear from you, we’ll get someone else.” Lu’s camp felt the approach showed a lack of respect for the players and remained non-committal. The association never called to ask for a commitment.

Then, the sponsor of last year’s tie against Japan—Eastern Multimedia—decided to get involved not long before the tie with Pakistan. When Wang’s availability was uncertain for health reasons, Eastern offered Lu financial incentives about a week ago to drop his challenger tournament in Australia and come home to play Davis Cup.

The Lu camp refused, unnerved by the lack of organization and planning and worried that they would be accused of participating simply for the money.
Here’s my question. If the Davis Cup is such a big deal for the country and players are vilified for not participating, how come the tennis association played it so low key? How come it only recruited a captain one week before the tie began? How come Eastern Multimedia, which seems to want to take over the event, didn’t decide until 11th hour this year to get involved?
If they don’t take Davis Cup seriously enough to provide a structured plan to promote it, then why should the players take it seriously?

As one of the international sporting events in which Taiwan can really be competitive, the Davis Cup—and tennis in general—should be supported. I agree with captain Wu Chung-lung that Lu’s absence is a wake-up call that more local talent should be developed to give more Davis Cup depth. But ultimately, sponsors and the association have to develop a plan with clear rules of the game, yes, participation incentives, in coordination with the players to make it all work. If a player then begs out, critics will have a legitimate beef.

Treat the Davis Cup with a sense of importance and organization, and players will commit to the program.

Yes, even Lu.

el_profe
02-12-2006, 10:46 PM
I thought LU did the right thing, I mean look at how the swiss federation must feel? Taiwan was playing a definetly inferior team and it should of been 5-0. I imagine he will play against korea. Oh and he should of won the Burnie Challenger the field was weaker than some futures that will be played this week.

Lee
02-12-2006, 10:51 PM
I certainly hope that Rendy will play vs. Korea. We will have the homecourt advantage so that's always a good thing.

Anyway, Rendy is training in Tokyo for the week and will play at Internationaux du Doubs challenger next week. Notice how he avoids coming back to Taiwan, even though it is so close to Japan? There is definately a tension between his camp and the Taiwanese tennis organization.

I honestly don't think Jimmy has enough fuel to beat Blake on Tuesday night, but I'm glad he is here. I just hope he'll win a couple of matches in Memphis, in Vegas, Indian Wells and NASDAQ. We'll see how everything goes.

MasterTS
02-14-2006, 10:07 PM
I salute you wang! I don't want to give any match though but good fight with James

Lee
02-17-2006, 11:15 PM
Hey all,

Sorry I did not have the opportunity to do the interview. I had an exam on Thursday, so I spent Mon, Tues and Wednesday studying for it. I set up an interview with Jimmy last Wednesday, but I had to call it off because I totally did not feel prepared to take the exam.

I attended his match last night and had a careful examination of his game. As much as I hate to admit you critics on this board, he is not (yet) a top 50 material. His game is way too "soft." I think he played with too much hesistation. I think he definately has the speed, the shot selection and the touch to make it to the upper echelon of the ATP but right now he is not playing with much confidence (at least not from what I saw). I was sitting about 10 feet away from him, right next to Murray's Box, and I was cheering for Jimmy: "let's go! great shot! keep fighting!" but I guess he was not "feeling" his shots.

Jimmy certainly had a chance to beat Murray. He was up 3-0 on the first set. Jimmy was serving at 3-4 on the first set and they went to ten deuces, where Jimmy finally netted an easy shot and allowed Andy to break him. I thought that was the most critical point of the match because everything was going downhill for Jimmy from that point on.

Also I thought Jimmy needs to act more confident on the court. He apparently got robbed multiple times (ask ANYONE who attended the match) but he did not fight for any of them. He just assumed the right calls and kept on playing the points. If this happened to Kiefer or Roddick I guarenteed they would have shaken Lars Graf out from his chair! I guess we Taiwanese people were raised to be more shy and reserved but that does not mean we should be less confident than anyone else.

Anyway, Jimmy just told me that he pulled his right hip after the end of the first set. That kind of explained his apparent slowness and plethora of unforced errors in the second set. I thought Jimmy should have taken an injury time out and get his hip massaged at the very least, but he did not do so.

In conclusion, I think Jimmy is a very solid top 100 ATP player and will stay at around 50-80 in the rankings. His speed, touch and consistencies are his assets, but he must improve his weaknesses, which include lack of confidence, lack of power and weak second serve. With that said, I would like to conclude my thread with an email I have just received from Jimmy:



Hi Jason
Im leaveing tomorrow morning to memphis and last night
end of first set I think i pull my right hip and when
to see the chinese doctor this afternoon and its
better now.but still have to watch out.try to practice
sunday and see how it goes ..
anyway just wanna to say sorry about the
interview.cant make it this time.but forsure if have a
chances in the future.
all the best
take care
Jw

DaveGrable
02-18-2006, 01:29 AM
And in conclusion, the last great Asian hope hung his head in defeat and rode off into the sunset, forever to dwell in anonymity.

Lee
02-18-2006, 01:36 AM
Welcome back, Dave!

I did not know you can get Internet service @ trailers...great to hear from you again.

arnz
02-18-2006, 06:02 AM
Jimmy Wang, Donald Young. Jenkins, so many players I don't know. I guess these are the grinders, who are staying around ratings of 100?

And in conclusion, the last great Asian hope hung his head in defeat and rode off into the sunset, forever to dwell in anonymity.

This type of person I don't understand. You know, when something is obviously of no interest or relation to me, I just pass it by. So what if asians are interested in an asian tennis player? Doesn't that sound ridiculous? Of course they would be interested in an asian, there haven't been many in tennis, Michael Chang is the only one I can think of. Why would it bother anyone else, and why would they even keep posting on a thread that doesn't apply to them?

In a basketball game that I saw, the person who they talked about and who got the most close up shots happened to be a white person, in a sport that is certainly 95% black. Why? I believe that its because the predominant audience is white and they need somebody to relate to and there arent very many good white players. Everyone tends to identify with someone they think somewhat resembles them.

MasterTS
02-21-2006, 09:43 PM
I follow tennis ATP, WTA, challengers and FU tennis very closely mainly because I put lots of $$$ in gambling their results. Trust me, Wang is a loser and won't ever break into real ATP tennis. He's record is 15-17 and his been a pro since 2001.. that gives him 5 years of tennis play and he accumulated a total of 32 ATP tennis matches... bravo!.. i dont care about his challengers record.. look who plays challengers???? In 2005 lost to bursmuller, moodie, korolev, berrer, portas (the kid), behrend, and a buncha other no namers that will hang around the CH and FU circuit for the rest of their carreers.. Hi thomas zib, who also beat wang last year!

Add Julian Benneteau to the list of challengers that have beaten Wang LoL!