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View Full Version : Klippermate Experiences


iradical18
06-15-2004, 09:22 PM
I'll be getting my first stringing machine, a Klippermate in the next few days, so I'd like to get some of you guys' experiences with it.

drop shot
06-15-2004, 09:37 PM
A good basic stringing machine. You can get fairly consistent results. The only negatives I have heard or personally encountered are

1. Sometimes you may experience crimping of the string.
2. Not as fast as other models.
3. You gotta be extra careful with the oversized, lightweight frames with the Klipper's 2 point mounting.
4 You might want to get some Gamma or Prince clamps as they are much better than Klippers.

Other than that I was pleased with mine. The good points are...
1. Easy to carry to tournaments
2. The best customer service in the business
3. Good consistent results.

Craig Sheppard
06-15-2004, 09:37 PM
I've had one for 3 years now. I've probably done 20 or 30 jobs with it (all my own and a few friends), it works well for the price. The mains go farily quickly, and I fine I've significantly lowered my time by preweaving the crosses.

You'll be more comfortable and faster if you find a good stand or cart to put your stringer on; something that puts the racquet around elbow level works really well.

After a bunch of stringing, you'll notice the clamps don't work as well. They need to be cleaned every now and then when you noticed them slipping. Q-tips and Rubbing alcohol worked well for me. I then used some superfine sandpaper to "rough them up" a bit, by clamping on the sandpaper and pulling it out. Got out some extra gunk. Works the same as new now.

Good luck w/ your Klippermate.

Craig

JGR
06-16-2004, 05:24 AM
I have had the same Klippermate for 13 or 14 years. I couldn't tell you how many times I have strung with it--probably 200 - 300. You can string a racquet quite consistently with the Klipper. I damaged one racquet (mine) several years ago by forgetting to tighten supports after mounting.

As for the clamps, I prefer (by a lot) the vise grip Klipper ones to the Gamma composite. I have never cleaned them with anything--I do have to adjust them occasionally. In my experience, the Gamma ones are much more prone to slip. I have both and always use the Klippers.

I can easily string a racquet on the Klipper in 25 to 30 minutes, set up to tear down. The machine is a good choice for the home stringer. I happen to like it better than the plastic ATS ones but I seem to be in the minority. I have no doubt in my mind that it's more durable.

fantom
06-16-2004, 06:14 AM
I've had my Klippermate for ~4 years now, and have strung ~100 racquets w/ it.

I second everything that Craig said.

Along w/ cleaning the clamps, I've also had to clean the mechanism on the maching that holds the strings when pulling. Smooth, waxy string may slip after a number of string jobs. I had this happen to me with one type of string that a friend of mine used a few years back (don't remember the string). I used Rubbin alcohol and Q-tip as well.

Good luck!

gmlasam
06-16-2004, 07:28 AM
I have had the same Klippermate for 13 or 14 years. I couldn't tell you how many times I have strung with it--probably 200 - 300. You can string a racquet quite consistently with the Klipper. I damaged one racquet (mine) several years ago by forgetting to tighten supports after mounting.

As for the clamps, I prefer (by a lot) the vise grip Klipper ones to the Gamma composite. I have never cleaned them with anything--I do have to adjust them occasionally. In my experience, the Gamma ones are much more prone to slip. I have both and always use the Klippers.

I can easily string a racquet on the Klipper in 25 to 30 minutes, set up to tear down. The machine is a good choice for the home stringer. I happen to like it better than the plastic ATS ones but I seem to be in the minority. I have no doubt in my mind that it's more durable.I totaly agree with you JGR, and you are not in the minority with your exerperince with the Klippermate. I too have very good experience with my Klippermate. I have had it for 5 years now, and I have not had any problems with it and any problems stringing my racquets and others. I too agree that the klippermate floating clamps are much more durable. It is steel and will not quickly wear out. I have friends who own gamma stringers and they did not last as long as my klipper. It all comes down to the person that is doing the stringing. Sometimes, I hear complaints about Klippermate, but often times it is the fault of the stringer for not following instructions and being careless on how they string.

predrag
06-16-2004, 12:16 PM
I'll be getting my first stringing machine, a Klippermate in the next few days, so I'd like to get some of you guys' experiences with it.

I bought my KlipperMate back in the 1994.
Last year I upgraded to LaserFibre ECO. Why, no reason really :)
I just wanted to change.
For the price KliperMate is terrific deal .
LaserFibre is better machine, I really like dual action clamps, but it does cost $600 :)

I had KlipperMate clamps broken on me twice. Both times got replacement, free of charge.
Keep your receipt, though. I had trouble proving that I actually bought KlipperMate.

Regards, Predrag

wksoh
09-16-2008, 02:16 AM
I have had the same Klippermate for 13 or 14 years. I couldn't tell you how many times I have strung with it--probably 200 - 300. You can string a racquet quite consistently with the Klipper. I damaged one racquet (mine) several years ago by forgetting to tighten supports after mounting.

As for the clamps, I prefer (by a lot) the vise grip Klipper ones to the Gamma composite. I have never cleaned them with anything--I do have to adjust them occasionally. In my experience, the Gamma ones are much more prone to slip. I have both and always use the Klippers.

I can easily string a racquet on the Klipper in 25 to 30 minutes, set up to tear down. The machine is a good choice for the home stringer. I happen to like it better than the plastic ATS ones but I seem to be in the minority. I have no doubt in my mind that it's more durable.

yes.. my Gamma Nylon clamps are slipping like crazy - so I end up overclamping and distorting my precious multifilaments. The Gamma rotating rachet (drop weight) that holds the string is also slipping. I can't string anything above 55lbs and no poly at all. To be fair my Gamma 100 is 11 years old. But I remember the clamps slipping at the beginning of 2nd reel of strings.

aussie
09-16-2008, 02:58 AM
You kinda pick up on the aforementioned comments that the Klippermate does a decent and consistent string job, especially when weighed up against the cost. When you weigh up the quality of the string job and the cost with the lifetime warranty on the machine and all tools that come with it to the original owner, you really can't go wrong if you purchase this machine.

I also support the comments of the posters about maintenance. DO sand the floating clamp jaws with 120 grit abrasive cloth around 9 string jobs and DO clean the two gripper jaws with a cleaning solvent as frequently as every 3 string jobs. I find that non acetone nail polish remover applied with a toothbrush every 3 jobs is sufficient to keep the gripper jaws from slipping. These simple maintenance procedures will keep the Klippermate humming for years.

max
09-16-2008, 04:14 AM
I find the Kmate clamps much superior to Gamma.

Mansewerz
09-16-2008, 01:18 PM
I find the Kmate clamps much superior to Gamma.

I hate Gamma/ATS clamps with a passion.

yes.. my Gamma Nylon clamps are slipping like crazy - so I end up overclamping and distorting my precious multifilaments. The Gamma rotating rachet (drop weight) that holds the string is also slipping. I can't string anything above 55lbs and no poly at all.

Try cleaning your gripper jaws. Consult your manual or Gamma tech for help.

Bengt
09-16-2008, 01:27 PM
yes.. my Gamma Nylon clamps are slipping like crazy - so I end up overclamping and distorting my precious multifilaments. The Gamma rotating rachet (drop weight) that holds the string is also slipping. I can't string anything above 55lbs and no poly at all.

You replied to a post made 4 years and 3 months ago. I love it.

I also love my Klippermate and stand. Gotta get the stand!

max
09-16-2008, 02:57 PM
Oh, I do clean my gear, usually with rubbing alcohol applied with a rag overnight. This works pretty good. Sometimes a toothbrush to scrub up whatever poly gunk is around.

But the Gamma clamps have an awkward balance and dangle precariously under the stringbed, and despite cleaning, their grip surfaces do a modest job. I shouldn't complain: I just tighten them up like crazy to make it hold.

It's nice the Kmate's can work with just a one-hand motion.

All those inexpensive machines work well enough as personal stringers.

wksoh
09-16-2008, 07:02 PM
You replied to a post made 4 years and 3 months ago. I love it.

I also love my Klippermate and stand. Gotta get the stand!

I just threw away my Gamma drop weight. Currently shopping for another. Either the Laserfibre or the Klippermate. Hope the Klippermate doesn't disappoint.

T1000
09-16-2008, 07:13 PM
Great machine. Only negative for me is it is not as fast as other models. It takes me about 30 min to do a string job

max
09-19-2008, 06:53 PM
30 minutes is superfast any way you slice it! Congratulations!

wksoh
09-19-2008, 09:35 PM
Wow.. i just came across Eagn.s Challenger 1 stringer for US$299 - comes with linear ball bearing gripper.
Is linear grip any easy to use?
Does it slip after some use?

Think I'll do a search too... thanks

Gibby
09-23-2008, 12:23 PM
Dear Klipper Pros,

I just started using the Klippermate and I am practicing on some inexpensive 17g string. I have noticed that the string jaws "rough" up the string where they were in contact in the string jaw groove. Is that normal? or am I doing something wrong? Thanks

mrw
09-23-2008, 01:48 PM
I love the little bugger


Gibby, loosen up the clamps a hair

aussie
09-24-2008, 02:22 AM
Dear Klipper Pros,

I just started using the Klippermate and I am practicing on some inexpensive 17g string. I have noticed that the string jaws "rough" up the string where they were in contact in the string jaw groove. Is that normal? or am I doing something wrong? Thanks

The gripper jaws do tend to mark the string a little where the string is gripped as the rod is lowered. The amount of the marking is dependant on the type of string. Doesn't cause any problems. Remember to clean the jaws with a suitable solvent (non acetone nail polish remover works well for me) around every 3 string jobs. The floating clamps need cleaning with 120 grit abrasive cloth around every 9 jobs.

theace21
09-24-2008, 05:46 AM
You replied to a post made 4 years and 3 months ago. I love it.

I also love my Klippermate and stand. Gotta get the stand!

Might be a record, but congratulations - someone knows how to use SEARCH!

TheRed
09-24-2008, 07:46 AM
Wow.. i just came across Eagn.s Challenger 1 stringer for US$299 - comes with linear ball bearing gripper.
Is linear grip any easy to use?
Does it slip after some use?

Think I'll do a search too... thanks

No problems with the linear gripper so far. i've only owned my combo 710 for 2 months though and strung only about 15 racquets on it. the challenger should be superior to the klipper in everyway, except for price. better clamping system, better mounting, better string gripper. IMO, the Klip is inferior to the gamma x-2 in every way, except for the clamps but that part is debatable.

drummerdan
09-24-2008, 07:53 AM
I bought my Kmate back in 1984. Yeah, that's right, 1984!! Paid $95, I think. After 100's of racquets, it's still rollin' strong. The only thing I have ever done is adjust the clamps a couple of times, but that's it.

My first marriage didn't last as long as my Kmate!!!! My advice - buy it!!

Gibby
09-27-2008, 07:58 AM
Thanks Aussie amd MRW

First off I have no experience at all stringing. I am only armed with the Klipper manuel, this forum and the guys on Youtube. I have never seen a drop weight stringer in action.

I cleaned up the clamps and the the jaws and used the sandpaper as suggested and that worked. I think the problem I am having, but getting better at, is estimating the amount of slack so that the tension rod is somewhat close to horizontal. I kept having to repull the strings and it was just tearing up the strings, it also did not help that my clamps were dirty and the strings were slipping thus causing mere scaring of the strings. I totally butchered my first string job. I have more questions for you pros;

1. Other than trial an error is there any way to adjust the clamps for the different gauges?


2. I noticed that on my strings (multis) they were discolored where the clamps were placed. The strings are a natural color and where the clamps were placed they are now white. There are someplaces where the stings are not round they they were flatten. I would assume this indicates I did some damage to the strings and the integrity of the string is ruined, is this a correct assumption?

3. Do the multifillament strings scar more then the others?

I took my racquets back to the pro shop to have them restrung until I feel confident that I will not destroy good strings. I am still practicing though.

aussie
09-27-2008, 02:41 PM
Thanks Aussie amd MRW

First off I have no experience at all stringing. I am only armed with the Klipper manuel, this forum and the guys on Youtube. I have never seen a drop weight stringer in action.

I cleaned up the clamps and the the jaws and used the sandpaper as suggested and that worked. I think the problem I am having, but getting better at, is estimating the amount of slack so that the tension rod is somewhat close to horizontal. I kept having to repull the strings and it was just tearing up the strings, it also did not help that my clamps were dirty and the strings were slipping thus causing mere scaring of the strings. I totally butchered my first string job. I have more questions for you pros;

1. Other than trial an error is there any way to adjust the clamps for the different gauges? I've adjusted my clamps so that one size fits all. I string 1.14mm up to 1.35mm with the same adjustment. Mine are adjusted so that when you hold the clamp up to eye level and tip it on it's side and the center spacer drops to the bottom teeth, the gap between the top of the center spacer and the top teeth approx equals the width of say a 1.25mm string. I use this for all string gauges and it grips well. I strongly contend that it is a far better proposition to have your clamps slightly over tightened than undertightened. At least you will not let the string slip and lose tension, and any flattening of the string is fine.


2. I noticed that on my strings (multis) they were discolored where the clamps were placed. The strings are a natural color and where the clamps were placed they are now white. There are someplaces where the stings are not round they they were flatten. I would assume this indicates I did some damage to the strings and the integrity of the string is ruined, is this a correct assumption? Multis do discolor uner clamping pressure. Completely normal, and where your strings are not round because of clamping pressure will be near the edges of the frame and will not affect the playability or durability of the string. I'm talking about a little flattening of the string naturally.

3. Do the multifillament strings scar more then the others?Softer, thicker strings will scar more, although that said, I tend to notice more clamp and gripper marks on poly because of the smooth texture of poly strings.

I took my racquets back to the pro shop to have them restrung until I feel confident that I will not destroy good strings. I am still practicing though.

Keep practicing, you will quickly become very proficcient. Good luck!!

max
09-28-2008, 05:02 PM
Gibby: those two things you mention are things you'll end up avoiding. You'll get a handle on how much string to dole out, and good clamping adjustment. I've heard, largely on this forum, that the discoloration, etc., isn't going to impact the string in any serious, performance-devaluing fashion.

TnTBigman
10-02-2008, 05:10 AM
hey guys, is there a potential to scratch the racquet during the process of mounting for stringing? i've been looking for detailed pics of the clamps to see if there is a cushioned material between the stringing metal clamps and the racquet. is there?

daboogieman
10-02-2008, 05:41 AM
no there isn't TnT but the metal on the flying clamps is rounded off and you won't really be able to put the clamps smashing up on frame while stringing.. well you can but you can just avoid it by putting the clamp 1 main over...

max
10-02-2008, 05:50 AM
I suppose if you want to dig them into the sides of a frame, you can do this if you want to scratch it up. It could be done, but you'd have to do it intentionally.

TnTBigman
10-02-2008, 09:24 AM
thanks for the response guys. i see a klippermate in my near future. stringing is $30 (labour and synthetic strings).

locomotion
10-02-2008, 09:06 PM
I suppose if you want to dig them into the sides of a frame, you can do this if you want to scratch it up. It could be done, but you'd have to do it intentionally.

I've never scratched a racquet before, but I just did when I strung a Yonex. I definitely didn't do it intentionally.

Any suggestions?

GeoffB
10-03-2008, 12:08 PM
I got a klippermate a few weeks ago (a hand me down from my bro, who has a fancier hand crank now).

I found it difficult to do my first string job (over 3 hours), but now I've got it down to about an hour. I'm impressed with the folks who can do a racket with a klippermate in 30 minutes. I don't doubt it's possible, since I burn a lot of time figuring out where to turn the racket and how much slack to put feed into the drop weight, and I'm still very slow weaving crosses.

On the bright side, even the first string job was totally indistinguishable from the string jobs I (used to) pay for. The Klippermate produces an excellent string job - the only difference from the more expensive machines, as far as I can tell, is speed and comfort, and maybe a little bit of accuracy (maybe - I didn't notice any difference).

However, one thing I'm starting to suspect after my first few rackets is that string accuracy is as much art as science. The way you tie off the knots, the natural tension loss, the stretching that happens while you set tension... all these things probably influence tension more than the electronic vs drop-weight difference. In other words, an electronic reading can probably tell you *exactly* how much tension you've put on a string, whereas a drop-weight can probably tell you this +/-1lb, but the overall tension of the resulting string job is probably influenced more by the care the stringer has taken than the stringing machine itself.

Oh a a coupe of tips - secure the floating clamps well before removing the string from the drop weight! Slipping clamps cost me a lot of time my first job. After you have set the right gauge for the clamp, make sure you tighten the bolt to lock it in place. Otherwise, your clamps may loosen as you string, and eventually they'll slip... and there goes half an hour of work.

Another tip - some people recommend adding a few pounds of tension to the final strings before tie-off. I did this, and it worked fine, but I also forgot to once, and it didn't make a particularly big difference. Another technique is to use an awl to secure the final string in place before tie-off - this can reduce the tension loss as long as you draw the string tight during the tie-off.

Stringing is fun, so enjoy!