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View Full Version : How come an ounce feels like a pound?


Golden Retriever
03-05-2006, 02:21 AM
I used to play with a racquet around 10 ounces and it felt too light to me. Lately I have switched to a racquet that is only about 1 ounce heavier and it feels too heavy. How come one ounce makes such a big difference? The heavier racquet has a smaller headsize but still it is hard to swing just because of the extra ounce.

mislav
03-05-2006, 02:33 AM
Perhaps there's greater difference in swingweight?

Could be because of a different balance, wider beam, denser string pattern...?

PBODY99
03-05-2006, 02:45 AM
The balance is different. The 10% increase in weight coupled with a a shift in how the weight is spread oouut in the frame can make a huge differnce. It affects your swing, search for the term swingweight.:cool:

Morpheus
03-05-2006, 04:02 AM
Maybe you've gotten weaker, if that is possible.

rocket
03-05-2006, 04:31 AM
The heavier racquet has a smaller headsize but still it is hard to swing just because of the extra ounce.

It might be that it's head-heavy. Check the swingweight. :cool:

Golden Retriever
03-05-2006, 04:47 AM
It might be that it's head-heavy. Check the swingweight. :cool:
It is headlight more so than the 10 ounce one.

NoBadMojo
03-05-2006, 06:29 AM
I dont claim to completely understand the dynamics of this all, but 1 oz can be a huge difference for some even if the balance is the same. It's all about the swingweight. I'm going from about a 315SW frame to a 310 (which isnt a huge change....4/10th oz), with a similar balance and I dont have to expend nearly as much energy and i find my legs fresher and better cardio by swinging the lighter frame. Those people who say that swinging the racquet has nothing to do with your legs going buttery, dont know what they are talking about I dont think

thejackal
03-05-2006, 02:22 PM
Lift a 10lb weight in your hand, tie the weight to a stick, then try to lift it.

Z-Man
03-05-2006, 02:23 PM
An ounce really is a big difference, even if the balance is the same. However, you can get used to it after a few sessions. You'll find you can hit heavier balls, and there will be less stress on your arm from shock. The benefits are excellent as long as you can swing it at a good speed. However, if it slows you down or tires you out, you migth have a problem.

ask1ed
03-05-2006, 02:26 PM
Sampras had a swing wt. of 367g, Fed a wt. of 326g.

Midlife crisis
03-05-2006, 03:26 PM
Sampras had a swing wt. of 367g, Fed a wt. of 326g.

Swingweight is measured in kg-cm^2, not in just grams. One is a measure of inertia (which is what swingweight is) and the other is a measure of static weight.

NBMJ, if you take a racquet where the mass is evenly distributed along its length and a different racquet where all the weight is concentrated at the ends, the balance and overall weight will be the same, but the racquet with all the mass concentrated on the ends will be much harder to swing - its swingweight is higher. This is because swingweight is a calculation of measuring where the weight is and how far away from where the axis of rotation it is, with how far away counting exponentially more than how much weight there is, which counts linearly. That's why two racquets of the same weight, same balance, but different weight distribution can have quite different swingweights.

NoBadMojo
03-05-2006, 03:35 PM
Swingweight is measured in kg-cm^2, not in just grams. One is a measure of inertia (which is what swingweight is) and the other is a measure of static weight.

NBMJ, if you take a racquet where the mass is evenly distributed along its length and a different racquet where all the weight is concentrated at the ends, the balance and overall weight will be the same, but the racquet with all the mass concentrated on the ends will be much harder to swing - its swingweight is higher. This is because swingweight is a calculation of measuring where the weight is and how far away from where the axis of rotation it is, with how far away counting exponentially more than how much weight there is, which counts linearly. That's why two racquets of the same weight, same balance, but different weight distribution can have quite different swingweights.

I know this..i was merely responding to the guys' question about how an oz can male a huge difference and can tire out your legs and wind you more easly and such..thought that was the topic of this thread