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View Full Version : tough decision: players or oversize racquet?


GrandSlam Legend
03-05-2006, 09:14 AM
i just recently got tennis elbow and not sure what to get really... i got tennis elbow from switching to a midsize racquet? not sure what you can classify a wilson nsix-one 95 as...

anyways...

i was thinking do i go with a players racquet... something heavy and smaller... or with an os lighter and bigger???

for heavy and smaller ill have to still swing hard but os lighter and bigger i won't have to swing as hard... not sure what to go with... i want to produce a certain amount of pace... but not sure if swinging a heavy racquet pretty fast will hurt my arm compared to a lighter racquet swinging slower???

Pomeranian
03-05-2006, 10:11 AM
The specs of the nsix-one doesn't look too threatening. What strings did you use? What tension? It might be a something with your technique. Have a coach look at your technique when you recover. Make sure you do everything your doctor tells you, to help with a sure and faster recovery. In response to your other post, the players I know who have recovered from TE are playing at 100% now. Don't quit tennis. I don't think a bigger, lighter, and generally stiffer racquet will help you. A more flexible one will.

Marius_Hancu
03-05-2006, 11:11 AM
FWIW
check my posting here:

Best arm friendly racquets?
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=77937

and read the links there

Marius_Hancu
03-05-2006, 11:12 AM
6.1 95 is definitely too stiff for lots of people
also, it has a pretty high SW
see the guidelines in my posting above

but what strings, what tension?
the fact that you don't report that shows you're not too aware ...

Slaz
03-05-2006, 11:43 AM
Like Marius says, the 6.1 95 is a stiff racquet. Although it's my main stick, I sometimes feel sore in my elbow and in my shoulder after a long and tough match (tight 3 setter).

Maybe the O3 tour MS, the Dunlop 200G or M-fil 200 would be a better choice (beware of the SW of the M-fil).

texcoug
03-05-2006, 07:41 PM
check out the Fischer M Speed O/S.

JacktheDu
03-05-2006, 11:17 PM
I've got my n six-one tour 90, which is kinda similar to your racket, last week. And just like you, I have sore arm and shoulder all over after just a few hours of play. These players' rackets really demand a lot from your muscles especially when serving. From what I've read from the health websites, a heavy and stiff frames like ours should only create very little frame shock and vibration which is the common cause of tennis elbow. However, having inadequate muscle power and fittness can leads to a lot of tenden problem at the shoulder especially if you have big serves. The websites suggest strenthening your muscles and stretch before you start playing with the racket. So I guess you can either change to a lighter racket model or if you are serious about tennis, go train your arm and shoulder muscle in a gym or at home. Just don't keep pushing yourself thinking that the arm or shoulder pain will get better, this can actually leads to some serious long term shoulder issues. Hope this help :)

BreakPoint
03-05-2006, 11:35 PM
All else being equal, in general, a lighter racquet will be worse for tennis elbow than a heavier racquet. This is because the weight and speed of the ball coming at you does not change regardless of the racquet that you're using, so your racquet needs to generate enough momentum to counteract the momentum of the ball to change the ball's direction. The momentum of the ball will push around a lighter racquet more than a heavier racquet. This means your elbow takes on more stress when trying to hold the racquet steady and to prevent it from getting pushed back. Heavier racquets can generate power from its weight, whereas lighter racquets need to be stiffer to generate its power to compensate for its lack of weight. Stiffer racquets transmit more shock, vibration, and torque to your arm creating more stress on your elbow, whereas, more flexible racquets can absorb more of the shock and vibration energy and torsional force through the flexing of the frame.

JacktheDu
03-06-2006, 12:20 AM
Well, according to tennis warehouse, a more flexible frame will create greater vibrations:
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/LC/RacquetStringTerms.html
"Generally, more flexible racquets produce greater low-level vibration than stiffer frames."

"Generally, a smaller, stiffer, lighter racquet strung at high tension will produce more shock than a larger, flexible, lightweight frame strung loosely."

I guess a stiffer frame will produce more shock for light racquet but less vibrations. With n6.1 95, I think its weight and Iso-absorb technology are enough to eliminate most of the shock and vibrations.

BreakPoint
03-06-2006, 12:28 AM
Well, according to tennis warehouse, a more flexible frame will create greater vibrations:
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/LC/RacquetStringTerms.html
"Generally, more flexible racquets produce greater low-level vibration than stiffer frames."


It's the high-level vibrations that are more harmful to your body than the low-level vibrations, and shock and torsional forces are even more harmful.

JacktheDu
03-06-2006, 12:34 AM
Yea, frame shock does more damage than vibration. But I think even though n6.1 95 is pretty stiff, it's heavy enough to eliminate most of the shock. And wilson's iso absorb technology is a plus too. What do you think of the racquet breakpoint?

AndrewD
03-06-2006, 12:37 AM
If it's a confirmed case of TE then you'd probably do well to look at the ProKennex range. Do a search in this forum and you'll come up with a lot of positive comments from people who've suffered TE and found the Kennex range helps greatly. Otherwise, Fischer and Volkl offer a nice degree of flex and a good selection of racquets that could suit you. If you like a slightly firmer feel the Volkl t10mp v-engine provides a good power, very generous sweetspot, good weight and swingweight plus a comfortable feel.

BreakPoint
03-06-2006, 12:58 AM
Yea, frame shock does more damage than vibration. But I think even though n6.1 95 is pretty stiff, it's heavy enough to eliminate most of the shock. And wilson's iso absorb technology is a plus too. What do you think of the racquet breakpoint?

Actually, I haven't heard of the "iso absorb" technology, what is it?

Yes, the nSix-One 95 is fairly stiff but not as stiff as the PS 6.1 Classic or even the HPS 6.1, IMHO. The nCode technology also helps to mute the shock a bit, so I do find it to be more comfortable than its two predecessors. However, it's still just a bit too stiff and a bit too heavy for my own personal tastes so I prefer something more flexible and just a bit lighter in swingweight, like the PS 6.0 95.

I do find the nSix-One 95 to be a great racquet though and also incredibly stable, as I discussed here in my comparative review: http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/playtests/BREAKP03.html

As you can see, I rated it best overall out of the three that I tested.

JacktheDu
03-06-2006, 01:09 AM
Yea I do agree that it's tough for us non-professional atheletes to keep our bodies in shape for a heavy racket like n6.1 95. And it's hard to commit yourself of going to a gym perhaps 3 or 4 times per week just for a racquet lol. It can really take the enjoyment out of it. I guess afterall you have to ask yourself how committed you are to tennis.
As for the iso-zorb technology, you can find it here:
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/technologies.html

Good review btw :)

BreakPoint
03-06-2006, 02:00 AM
Yea I do agree that it's tough for us non-professional atheletes to keep our bodies in shape for a heavy racket like n6.1 95. And it's hard to commit yourself of going to a gym perhaps 3 or 4 times per week just for a racquet lol. It can really take the enjoyment out of it. I guess afterall you have to ask yourself how committed you are to tennis.
As for the iso-zorb technology, you can find it here:
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/technologies.html

Good review btw :)

I agree. It also gets tougher staying in shape as you get older.

Are you sure the nSix-One 95 has this "iso-zorb" technology? It only mentions that a few Hyper Hammer models incorporate this.

Thanks for the compliment, BTW. :D

JacktheDu
03-06-2006, 11:53 AM
Actually it doesn't, I've mis-read the technology. Sorry for the wrong information. However, the new W line will include this technology though.

netman
03-06-2006, 12:56 PM
The Pro Kennex suggestion is a good one. If you like the nSix-One 95, check out the PK 5g or Ki 5. Same beam width, same flex, very HL. Head is slightly bigger and it will have a touch more power, but the Kinetic technology is a real arm saver. And the PK 5 series are just good all around, all court frames. You might find them to be as good or better than your current stick.

-k-