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scsusda
06-18-2004, 10:38 AM
I picked up a T-145II stringing machine at a yard sale. It only had one sheet of instructions starting with "Instructions for main stringing continued". Does anyone know where I could get a copy of the previous sheet which should contain the first six steps for Main Stringing? I am too old to play trial and error with this machine in my attempt to get started. Once started the process looks rather logical and should be a fun hobby for a retiree that doesn't have much to do.

Steve Huff
06-18-2004, 04:53 PM
With the Tremont, you'll be playing trial and error anyway. They haven't been around for a while, and the springs on those things go bad (get soft) after a while, so the tension is rarely what its set at. You'll need to get a tension calibrator (or fish scale) and do some testing to see how close your tension matches the tension at which its set. A good calibrator will probably cost you more than you paid for the machine.

scsusda
06-19-2004, 06:53 AM
Steve. thanks for the tip on spring precision variation over time. I will calibrate using weights and pulleys. Thus assuming an accurate crank type machine with 3 good Magic Clamps (Tremont term), one to put in tension assembly; the other two to move around the string bed; assuming stringing a racquet with the starting loop at center of throat; how do I get started so that I can get three strings in place so that I can effectively use my clamps?

joe sch
06-19-2004, 07:53 AM
Those tremont stringers were probably the most difficult stringers to ever use :x
I strung up 1 racket on one of those models just so I could say I did and punish myself :)

Steve Huff
06-19-2004, 08:42 AM
To start, using floating clamps I assume, clamp both middle strings at the throat. Next, pull the 1st and 2nd main together, use your 2nd clamp and clamp at the throat. Now you have 2 tensioned strings to start clamping. Go from there. When you start, give it some time when you're pulling because the 1st main will be looser than the 2nd. I always used my fingers to kind of pull the 2nd string back and forth a little to increase the tension on the first (while the machine is pulling).

scsusda
06-19-2004, 08:51 AM
Thanks Steve. I was going to clamp middle strings at throat and than tension 1st main and attempt to hold it's tension with awl jammed in 1 H, and than tension 2nd main. I suspect that I would have had a dickens of a time holding the tension in that first string. I will try your method once my string arrives from ****.

Gaines Hillix
06-23-2004, 12:39 PM
There's another one of these machines up on e-bay now that looks like it's complete, including instructions.

scsusda
06-23-2004, 01:31 PM
My 16 gage Gosen Multi oil biogut arrived today so I gave it a go. Three hours later with a smile on my face I took my revitalized weapon to the court. It passed the test.
Some thoughts for next time:
...With the stringer that I have don't waste time with the physics of strings. I had computed the tension different I would need for the typical cross versus the typical main so that the cross sectional area of the crosses would be the same as that of the main at 60 pounds. In reality the pull angle of most of the strings creates such rakish angles with the holes that one would have to assume a frictionless pivot point to even try varying the tension. I pulled them all 60-lbs.
...Next time I will place some short pieces of strings in the throat holes on both sides where the first crosses need to happen after the holes are already covered by the main strings. In my racquet holes 7 and 9 T. I used an awl inlieu of above and after many minutes and a few reclippings of the blunted end of the string I made it. Hopefully I didn't scratch the inner side of the string at the hole entry.
...Next time I will readjust my clamps more precisely for the 16-gage string. When I got to around 55-lbs one of them would start slipping. I didn't want to over squeeze the string and create excessive internal stresses so I will attempt to adjust all three clamps to start slipping at about 5-lbs over the desired string tension.
All in all I loved the new addition to 'things to do in retirement'. I will now cut the strings in my better racquet (strings will never break on their own) and opponents beware.

scsusda
06-25-2004, 06:00 AM
Gaines, thanks for tip on **** having my machine with instructions. I followed up and as often with **** the seller told half truths. He had sheet 2 but no sheet 1. Perhaps the first sheet of instructions was part of the box that machine came in...and thus long since tossed. I have found three folks with only sheet 2.

Steve Huff
07-01-2004, 09:25 AM
I wouldn't use an awl if you can keep from it. Instead of placing strings int he holes, loop a scrap piece of string around the string that blocks the hole. Using a string you just cut out is ideal, since it is already "U" shaped, so it doesn't need bent or anything. Then, you can physically pull the string out of the way of the hole when you have to get a string through it.

scsusda
07-01-2004, 09:34 AM
Thanks Steve, I learned the hard way that the string through the hole doesn't work. I will use your procedure the next time.

DERLOUIS
09-19-2006, 02:02 PM
I just bought one of these but it came withjout instructions.I cannot give my racquet any tension or what so ever. i would like to know how to use it.please help mE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!

I picked up a T-145II stringing machine at a yard sale. It only had one sheet of instructions starting with "Instructions for main stringing continued". Does anyone know where I could get a copy of the previous sheet which should contain the first six steps for Main Stringing? I am too old to play trial and error with this machine in my attempt to get started. Once started the process looks rather logical and should be a fun hobby for a retiree that doesn't have much to do.

DERLOUIS
09-19-2006, 02:05 PM
Can you help me with that stringing machine? I can't do anything! my email adress is derlouis@yahoo.fr
With the Tremont, you'll be playing trial and error anyway. They haven't been around for a while, and the springs on those things go bad (get soft) after a while, so the tension is rarely what its set at. You'll need to get a tension calibrator (or fish scale) and do some testing to see how close your tension matches the tension at which its set. A good calibrator will probably cost you more than you paid for the machine.

max
09-19-2006, 02:36 PM
This is truly old school tennis. . .

LttlElvis
09-19-2006, 02:58 PM
Go to the silent partner tennis website. It has some basic instructions on how to string. I have mine still in the original box from 1982. If I still have the instructions, I will try to post them.