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View Full Version : Any Racquet Advise For Arm/shoulder Injury Prone Man


A-Train
03-29-2006, 03:06 PM
I am 40 years old and have been playing for 15 years. I'd say I'm at a 3.5 level though I have made it to 4.0 a couple of years ago.

the last couple of years i have become injury prone. Wrist problem, tennis elbow and now shoulder injury. Although those are only minor injuries, i want to use the best forgiving racquet for my type of game.

I want to replace my wilson 3.6 with rollers which is a head heavy power racquet (stiffness 74, weight 9.3). I am comfortable with this racquet.
I have a medium swing, all around game.

I really need an advice on which racquets should i consider buying.
Thanks.

Midlife crisis
03-29-2006, 04:12 PM
I am 40 years old and have been playing for 15 years. I'd say I'm at a 3.5 level though I have made it to 4.0 a couple of years ago.

the last couple of years i have become injury prone. Wrist problem, tennis elbow and now shoulder injury. Although those are only minor injuries, i want to use the best forgiving racquet for my type of game.

I want to replace my wilson 3.6 with rollers which is a head heavy power racquet (stiffness 74, weight 9.3). I am comfortable with this racquet.
I have a medium swing, all around game.

I really need an advice on which racquets should i consider buying.
Thanks.

Depends a lot on what the injuries are exactly. for instance, a shoulder injury can come from impact shock or some impingement that may not be tennis related but positionally related.

However, in general, the safest racquets for your arm will be heavy and flexible. Heavy to provide a lot of inertia when meeting the ball, and flexible to take the peaks off the impact shock. Soft strings, like natural gut or multifilaments strung at the lower end of the recommended tension range, are also good.

NoBadMojo
03-29-2006, 04:16 PM
It would be helpful if we knew the Swingweight of this frame and if it feels too light for you, too heavy, or about right. Perhaps then we can point you in the right direction.

DarkSlayerX
03-29-2006, 04:18 PM
Try the Babolat pure storm, Its light, manuveable, power and its arm-friendly

netman
03-29-2006, 05:39 PM
Any Pro Kennex Kinetic frame. I've had shoulder surgery and battle arthritis in both wrists (both broken in the past). Any time my joints start acting up I grab my trusty PK 5g and the pain disappears instantly. If you like a high power, HH frame look at the 15 series (PK 15g or KI 15).

Search the forums here and you will find this PK story repeated over and over.

-k-

Marius_Hancu
03-30-2006, 05:09 AM
FWIW
check my posting here:

Best arm friendly racquets?
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=77937

backcourt
03-30-2006, 05:10 AM
You also want to go more headlight, and with a weight somewhere around 11 0z., with a swingweight no greater than 315 or so. Of course this is what works for my shoulder impingement history, you could be different. I also think your shoulder will need some time to adjust to a new racquet. Racquets which I have found shoulder friendly: Yonex mp 3i, Yonex RDX 500 mp, Pro Kennex Ki 5 (although I had to adjust to the somewhat higher swingweight). I found the Prince Diablo MP not so shouder friendly, as there was alot of shock outside the sweetspot. Finally, I wouldn't go beyond a 27 1/4 length. Hope this helps.

Marius_Hancu
03-30-2006, 05:10 AM
check my signature here:

Great fitness sites
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=33800

esp the Elbow and Wrist Pain sections

read threads on shoulder, wrist and elbow in the Health forum, condition yourself with surgical tubing or light weights, or things will get worse

vin
03-30-2006, 05:42 AM
Here are the specs from USRSA.

WilsonHyper Hammer 3.6 115 with Rollers
Length: 27.75
Weight: 266
Balance: 38.5
Swingweight: 335
Headsize: 115
Stiffness: 74

The 335 swingweight gives you a lot of room to try more weight AND a lower swingweight. I think backcourt's recommendation of 11 oz and 315 SW would be a pretty good place to start. You also want to get the stiffness as low as you can while having enough power to play your game without having to swing beyond your comfort level.

basil J
03-30-2006, 05:54 AM
A-train, I am 45 yrs young and often fight off aches and pains that come along with a lifetime of athletics. Though I don't use it anymore, I found the 03 tour to be extremely arm friendly. It is very flexible and quite muted ( there are 2 options for Grommetts now). The MP version is an easy swinging spin friendly frame that is spin friendly and very customizable.The pro kennex line is also very arm friendly. Hope this helps.

rocket
03-30-2006, 06:28 AM
I am 40 years old and have been playing for 15 years. I'd say I'm at a 3.5 level though I have made it to 4.0 a couple of years ago.

the last couple of years i have become injury prone. Wrist problem, tennis elbow and now shoulder injury. Although those are only minor injuries, i want to use the best forgiving racquet for my type of game.
Check out these sticks:

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCPRINCE-PO3HH.html

http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCVOLKL-VDNX3.html

Marius_Hancu
03-30-2006, 06:35 AM
might want to read
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=92368
wrt shoulder pain, etc

tennissavy
03-30-2006, 07:01 AM
I am 40 years old and have been playing for 15 years. I'd say I'm at a 3.5 level though I have made it to 4.0 a couple of years ago.

the last couple of years i have become injury prone. Wrist problem, tennis elbow and now shoulder injury. Although those are only minor injuries, i want to use the best forgiving racquet for my type of game.

I want to replace my wilson 3.6 with rollers which is a head heavy power racquet (stiffness 74, weight 9.3). I am comfortable with this racquet.
I have a medium swing, all around game.

I really need an advice on which racquets should i consider buying.
Thanks.
Hi A train, former New Yorker here to help you out! By adding an ounce or two in the handle of your racquet, through the instructions on this site's learning center, you will make the racquet head light and take a lot of stress off your arm. I could also recommend buying the Ncode n3 racquet and perhaps adding weight in the handle too. It's triad system really makes the racquet comfortable, less vibrations.:)

NoBadMojo
03-30-2006, 07:09 AM
Hi A train, former New Yorker here to help you out! By adding an ounce or two in the handle of your racquet, through the instructions on this site's learning center, you will make the racquet head light and take a lot of stress off your arm. I could also recommend buying the Ncode n3 racquet and perhaps adding weight in the handle too. It's triad system really makes the racquet comfortable, less vibrations.:)

I wouldnt suggest this. The guy's already got a 335swingweghted frame and a shoulder injury. adding more swingweight isnt going to help and is likely to worsen the situation.

Ronaldo
03-30-2006, 07:38 AM
A train, used the Wilson roller racquet before, it is quite comfortable. Demo the Volkl Catapults, PK, and Dunlop racquets, like the M-fils. Keep your tension low with soft strings. But to really ease your pain, must find out what is causing it, and re-hab that arm. From experience can only use the Head PC or iPrestige mid
and play totally pain-free. Tried the Cayman Pro Smash with success. But these are so dissimilar to that Hammer 3.6 it may be hard to switch.

bee
03-30-2006, 10:38 AM
Go with a Head Prestige of some sort and string it with natural gut at about 56#. That has worked for me. My favorite is the Head Prestige LM Mid with Klip Legend natural gut at 56# and with Babolat string savers for a little more bite. You should try it if you don't mind the weight. It's my all-time favorite setup.

slewisoh
03-30-2006, 05:07 PM
I was in your shoes about a month ago. I relied heavily on Marius' post on arm friendly racquets. I went from a light, stiff, HH Wilson Hyperhammer to a Volkl Tour 9 VEMP.

I'm a 40 year old female in average shape, and I was able to make the change to a heavier racquet. However, I did have some trouble finding a flexible, heavier racquet with moderate power. Many of the racquets that meet the specs I wanted were low powered racquets and were therefore too much work for me.

I really liked the Pro Kennex Ionic Ki 5 for it's comfort and found all of my shots to be dependable with this racquet. But it was a bit cumbersome to swing for me so I ultimately went with the Volkl. Still trying to figure out strings though!

Highly recommend the TW demo program. :)

tennissavy
03-30-2006, 08:16 PM
I wouldnt suggest this. The guy's already got a 335swingweghted frame and a shoulder injury. adding more swingweight isnt going to help and is likely to worsen the situation.
It should be just the thing to do as long as the balance is headlight. I had a nasty injury from weightlifting that prevented me from swinging my racquet without pain. I started adding weight to the handle to make the racquet headlight and I had no more pain. I was able to play while my body healed. It made all the difference in the world so I can talk from my own personal experience.

tennissavy
03-31-2006, 02:40 PM
I hope you make out ok with your arm injuries. Let us know what you decide to do. Please consider my advice. It worked for me.

Tof
04-01-2006, 11:54 AM
A-train, I am 45 yrs young and often fight off aches and pains that come along with a lifetime of athletics. Though I don't use it anymore, I found the 03 tour to be extremely arm friendly. It is very flexible and quite muted ( there are 2 options for Grommetts now). The MP version is an easy swinging spin friendly frame that is spin friendly and very customizable.The pro kennex line is also very arm friendly. Hope this helps.


Basil, I also experience shoulder problems for the first time. I consider switching froim the ncode ntour which I think did not help me to the ncode nsix one 18*20 that a friend of min e gave me.Can you tell me more about it: arm friendliness, performance,...? Tks.

sureshs
04-01-2006, 12:07 PM
I was in your shoes about a month ago. I relied heavily on Marius' post on arm friendly racquets. I went from a light, stiff, HH Wilson Hyperhammer to a Volkl Tour 9 VEMP.

I'm a 40 year old female in average shape, and I was able to make the change to a heavier racquet. However, I did have some trouble finding a flexible, heavier racquet with moderate power. Many of the racquets that meet the specs I wanted were low powered racquets and were therefore too much work for me.

I really liked the Pro Kennex Ionic Ki 5 for it's comfort and found all of my shots to be dependable with this racquet. But it was a bit cumbersome to swing for me so I ultimately went with the Volkl. Still trying to figure out strings though!

Highly recommend the TW demo program. :)

Really, there is nothing better than the Ki 5 for arm issues. Maybe you can try the Ki 15.

slewisoh
04-01-2006, 07:28 PM
Really, there is nothing better than the Ki 5 for arm issues. Maybe you can try the Ki 15.

Actually I considered both the Ki10 and the Ki15 but both were too stiff (>65)and light (<11 oz.). Been there, done that! I think my Tour 9 VEMP is around a 64, weighs over 11 oz and has a swingweight of 308. The Ki 5 was not much heavier, but it's swingweight was significantly more than the Volkl - just too much for me to enjoy playing with.

NoBadMojo
04-01-2006, 07:38 PM
It should be just the thing to do as long as the balance is headlight. I had a nasty injury from weightlifting that prevented me from swinging my racquet without pain. I started adding weight to the handle to make the racquet headlight and I had no more pain. I was able to play while my body healed. It made all the difference in the world so I can talk from my own personal experience.



i see..so you are saying because this happened to work for you that it will work for everyone. ..do you realize how much lead you would have to add to make this persons' frame headlight? the swingweight would likely be about 380 or something ridiclous like that since it is obviously quite head heavy and already has a 335 swingweight

Max8950
04-01-2006, 08:03 PM
ProKennex Redondo- Best frame on the market

tennissavy
04-01-2006, 08:58 PM
i see..so you are saying because this happened to work for you that it will work for everyone. ..do you realize how much lead you would have to add to make this persons' frame headlight? the swingweight would likely be about 380 or something ridiclous like that since it is obviously quite head heavy and already has a 335 swingweight
NO, I made it clear that I think that since it did work for me that it MIGHT work for the person who started this thread.

southpaw
04-02-2006, 11:56 AM
ProKennex Redondo- Best frame on the market

Looks like someone just got a new frame.

I don't know if I would recommend the redondo. It is flexible, but it is also VERY low powered, along with having a dense pattern in a small head. Plus, the huge drop in SW might be too drastic for the OP.

I would echo the O3 tour recommendations. They are headlight, medium/high power, nice flex, and good heft without being too heavy.

Stroke
04-04-2006, 08:58 AM
I read somewhere that the only racquets that should be considered arm friendly are ones that have a stiffness rating of 61 or less, have a mid headsize between 95 and 102, and be at least 11 oz. If you do a search using the TW racquet finder, there are not a whole lot that meet this criteria. The Prince 03 Tour does qualify.

basil J
04-04-2006, 11:59 AM
TOF, the ncode 6.1 18 x 20 is fairly stiff, however it is very headlight (12pts,), weighs in at 11.7 oz unstrung. It is very comfortable, absorbs shock very well and is quite spin friendly. The 03 tour was more muted and silkier feeling, however it's flexible throat made it less of a serving machine than the ncode. You can also hit out flat shots easier IMO with the ncode 6.1. I think if you have good mechanics and like a farily stiff frame, it is worth a look. I hit with an 03 tour MP yesterday for about 5 minutes after play a set with the ncode and the ncode is just a very solid frame.

jonolau
04-04-2006, 08:10 PM
A-train, before you go and spend money on a new racquet to solve this, I would suggest you stop and take stock first.

Go spend one session with an objective teaching pro first to find out whether there is a fundamental problem with your swing. Just like anything, you won't notice subtle changes that occur from game to game, but after a couple of years, your swing could have morphed.

Sometimes fitness levels also play a part. As we go past the 25 year marker in our lives, our bodies are degenerating, and by the time we hit 40, we would have lost almost 50% of our muscle mass (on the basis that you do no weight/strength exercises in the gym). Therefore, in order to compensate for this lowered fitness/strength level, you could have forced your shots even harder to achieve the same power, and inured yourself in the process.

This is the unfortunate part of our mortal existence, nothing lasts forever, unless we take better care of our bodies. You will need a holistic approach to your tennis game. Work on stamina, work on strength building, work on style.

A-Train
04-06-2006, 12:33 PM
Folks,
Thank you all for your reply. Ok, here's my dilemna.

- I demoed at least 3 heavier, head light racquets. Just can get comfortable with any of them. My game these days need power to compete and i just can't feel comfortable with not enough mojo in my shots using HL sticks.

Maybe, i can get comfortable with a HL in time but, what i'm afraid of is, i need to exert more effort to get the shots that i want and it may burn me out in in a longer match.

So, power racquet with risk of pain (my injuries were never serious) or my game suffers with a HL?

I am almost tempted now with tennissavvy's recommendation to add weight on the handle of my wilson 3.6. Just try it out see if it works.

If i have to choose among the racquets that i have demoed, ill get the Volkl Catapult V1. It still has a swingweight of 330 but the stiffness is 64 and weight is 10.8 compared to my wilson which has 74 and 9.3.

I guess my problem is i'm so much stuck to my racquet. I haven't had a HL racquet for at least 10 years. I guess i have to ask a question to those people who switched from HH power racquets to HL: WOULD I BE ABLE TO GET MY GAME TO THE SAME LEVEL WITH MY HH STICK IF I SWITCH TO A HL IN DUE TIME? I'm a forty year old man and i feel that i need the power but, is it really that big of an adjustment? or is it more psychological that if i don't have my power stick i would lose my edge?

A-Train
04-06-2006, 01:28 PM
Folks,
Thank you all for your reply. Ok, here's my dilemna.

- I demoed at least 3 heavier, head light racquets. Just can get comfortable with any of them. My game these days need power to compete and i just can't feel comfortable with not enough mojo in my shots using HL sticks.

Maybe, i can get comfortable with a HL in time but, what i'm afraid of is, i need to exert more effort to get the shots that i want and it may burn me out in in a longer match.

So, power racquet with risk of pain (my injuries were never serious) or my game suffers with a HL?

I am almost tempted now with tennissavvy's recommendation to add weight on the handle of my wilson 3.6. Just try it out see if it works.

If i have to choose among the racquets that i have demoed, ill get the Volkl Catapult V1. It still has a swingweight of 330 but the stiffness is 64 and weight is 10.8 compared to my wilson which has 74 and 9.3.

I guess my problem is i'm so much stuck to my racquet. I haven't had a HL racquet for at least 10 years. I guess i have to ask a question to those people who switched from HH power racquets to HL: WOULD I BE ABLE TO GET MY GAME TO THE SAME LEVEL WITH MY HH STICK IF I SWITCH TO A HL IN DUE TIME? I'm a forty year old man and i feel that i need the power but, is it really that big of an adjustment? or is it more psychological that if i don't have my power stick

slewisoh
04-06-2006, 03:59 PM
A Train I am a 40 year old female in the process of switching to a HL from a Wilson Hyper Hammer and yes it is difficult. In my opinion, moving to a HL racquet exposes faulty technique. I used to think I had a pretty good lob until I switched racquets. I now see I was relying on my HH racquet to do the work for me. The same is true for my volleys, in that my previous racquet compensated for my lousy footwork.

I'm not so hung up on losing power with my racquet as I need to bring more control to my doubles game anyway. I swing through my groundstrokes, so have not lost any power there. Perhaps your concerns relate more to your singles game - sorry if I missed the boat on that one.

Many of the arm friendly racquets (>11 oz, flex < 64) have higher swing weights and are low powered to boot. Not much fun for me. If you do some careful searching you will see that there are heavier, flexible racquets with lower swingweights and more power. The Volkl Tour 9 VEMP has a strung weight of 11.5 but a swingweight of around 308. I would have never believed I could play with such a heavy racquet, the the swing weight makes it a pleasure to use. In comparison, my hyperhammer was less than 10 oz but had a swing weight in the 330's. Plenty of power in the Prince 03 White too.

At this point it would seem more important to protect your body long term so that you can play as long as you wish to. Are you really going to be blasting the ball for winners when you are 75? Maybe you will...



.

slewisoh
04-06-2006, 04:33 PM
Folks,
-
If i have to choose among the racquets that i have demoed, ill get the Volkl Catapult V1. It still has a swingweight of 330 but the stiffness is 64 and weight is 10.8 compared to my wilson which has 74 and 9.3.



330 is a pretty high swing weight. Use the racquet finder and specifiy 10.8 oz to 11.8 oz, stiffness< 64, and swingweight<320. I was surprised at the # of medium powered racquets that came up, especially in the Dunlop and Volkl lines. I'm telling you, if you get the SWINGWEIGHT DOWN you can manage a heavier (safer) racquet.

I have completely eliminated my wrist pain in the last month simply by switching from the hyper hammer to my Volkl. Maybe you just need to try some more racquets?

JakeJr
04-08-2006, 11:13 AM
I'm a senior (just turned 61) and have always loved playing tennis, but I'd been away from the sport for a while. When I decided to begin playing again I figured I needed a really light racquet, so I bought one with a strung weight of 9.1 oz, a swing weight of 293 and 5 points head heavy.

After playing with the new racquet several times I began to have shoulder pain in my racquet arm. As it turned out, my son is a cadet at West Point and had developed a similar pain in his right arm from doing all the pull-ups he's required to do in his physical fitness training.

The doctor at the Point prescribed Naproxen Sodium tablets and rest. I did a GOOGLE search on Naproxen and learned that Naproxen is the active ingredient in ALEVE, so I bought a bottle. The first day after taking the ALEVE the pain was 90% gone and after day three only a very slight trace remained.

After doing a lot of research on the internet and to address what I thought was the cause of my shoulder pain, I added lead tape to the racquet hoop at 6 o'clock and counter-weighted the handle (fishing lead sinkers) to change the head-heavy racquet to head-light and to increase it's weight.

I'm no longer having any problem with arm pain and, as a side benefit, the racquet feels much more stable, my shots feel more solid and I even like the extra weight.

Just my experience.

Jake

tennissavy
04-08-2006, 06:53 PM
I'm a senior (just turned 61) and have always loved playing tennis, but I'd been away from the sport for a while. When I decided to begin playing again I figured I needed a really light racquet, so I bought one with a strung weight of 9.1 oz, a swing weight of 293 and 5 points head heavy.

After playing with the new racquet several times I began to have shoulder pain in my racquet arm. As it turned out, my son is a cadet at West Point and had developed a similar pain in his right arm from doing all the pull-ups he's required to do in his physical fitness training.

The doctor at the Point prescribed Naproxen Sodium tablets and rest. I did a GOOGLE search on Naproxen and learned that Naproxen is the active ingredient in ALEVE, so I bought a bottle. The first day after taking the ALEVE the pain was 90% gone and after day three only a very slight trace remained.

After doing a lot of research on the internet and to address what I thought was the cause of my shoulder pain, I added lead tape to the racquet hoop at 6 o'clock and counter-weighted the handle (fishing lead sinkers) to change the head-heavy racquet to head-light and to increase it's weight.

I'm no longer having any problem with arm pain and, as a side benefit, the racquet feels much more stable, my shots feel more solid and I even like the extra weight.

Just my experience.

Jake
See, this guy found the same thing as myself. Listen to Jake and me. We know what we are talking about.:)

Final_Match_Point
04-08-2006, 07:07 PM
Weighting and lead works wonders. I just added 30 grams(24 grams of wilson lead bars + new grip and overgrip) And I must say its alt better for my arm and for actual play. Look what they did at racquet fidner to a wilson , they added like a 100 grams handle end, and its amazing

heycal
04-15-2006, 10:33 PM
You want arm friendly AND powerful? A racket that does the work for ya? The Ki 15 PSE is the answer. Head light, magic kinetic technology, and packs a mean wallop with minimal effort.