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View Full Version : I must ask, Re: Fischer mfg


Bora
03-31-2006, 02:35 PM
Who here loves the fact that all Fischers come with that label on them indicating the actual weight of the racquet. And even more amazing is that, every Fischer I got was within 1 or 2 grams of the published spec for that racquet. I mean for a 320-330 gram racquet, that is amazing consistency in manufacturing.

Now, I have gotten Wilson Pro Staffs with as much as 10 grams in diffence between sticks.

vkartikv
03-31-2006, 02:57 PM
They seem to have very good QC. The one problem with them is they have their buttcap sticking out and they include that in their racquet length spec, so a 27" racquet is really only 26.8" of usable length..

Bora
04-01-2006, 07:20 AM
Well, that's not always a bad thing. I never had trouble serving with their standard length sticks, and it makes their extra long sticks just the right length, especially for 2 HBHs.

kenshireen
04-01-2006, 08:13 AM
I have used a 110 since the days of the infamous Prince aluminum 1976 innovation. I still remember being told it was illegal. It made a big improvement in my game.
I have continued using a 110 for 30 years. The last 20 I have used a PS 7.0 which has a flex rating of 55 and has considerable fiberglass content. I don't know about fatigue but it is horrible on volleys (as am I) and my serves are probably 10-15 miles slower than when I use a stiffer racquet of todays standards.
My question is this.. I am so used to the big sweet spot but I would like to change to a smaller head which will give me more snap and a crisper feeling. I am worried about losing the larger sweetspot that usually comes with a 110 head.
Can somebody tell me if it is possible to have a smaller head (98-100) and still have a sweetspot as large as on my PS 7.0. Any recommendations would be appreciated. I cannot stand the wide beam, superstiff 9-10 oz racquets.

Sorry for the long winded post

milo
04-01-2006, 09:26 AM
it is just a matter of qc. but i recall that you can buy wilson in twin condition.

samster
04-01-2006, 04:13 PM
Wilson quality control is terrible. I have two Prostaff 6.1 same gripsize that play so different from each other.

Keifers
04-01-2006, 05:12 PM
The spec card that came with my 4-5/8 M Speed 105 says:

320 grams (11.29 ozs.)
314 mm (9.1 pts HL)

Very nice hitting frame. Very maneuverable -- feels more like a 100 sq. in.

Captain Haddock
04-01-2006, 05:21 PM
Not only do Fischers come with a specs sticker, but have y'all noticed that it's been the same handwriting on the stickers for years? All the Fischers I've bought over the last 10 years at least had a sticker with the same handwriting, or so it seems. I just got a few Pro Tours and the stickers are similar to the ones that were on Vacuum Pros I bought years ago... Now that's quality control!

JeffG
04-02-2006, 05:37 AM
I just picked up three Pro Tours as well. All three measured at 296 grams and balanced at 325-327 mm. That's impressively close.

Fabrice, any stringing recommendations? Thanks.

milo
04-02-2006, 08:06 AM
where does fischer racket being made?

JeffG
04-02-2006, 09:11 AM
Fischers are designed in Austria, made it China. Older ones were made in Austria.

milo
04-02-2006, 10:12 AM
if fischer is made in china and have consistency in manufacturing then i must admit that they have a very good quality control

Captain Haddock
04-02-2006, 11:09 AM
Jeff, I strung my Pro Tours at 61 with a Kirschbaum Touch Turbo/ Prince Synthetic gut duraflex 16. It's a very flexible frame, but the head is large enough to justify stringing just above 60. I added a little weight (15 g. build up sleeve, head tape), which brings them up to 320 g. It's a really good all around frame, although it may be a tad too flexible on the slice backhand to really bite the ball. As always, I really love the Fischer grip and cosmetics.

JeffG
04-02-2006, 11:47 AM
Thanks, Fabrice. The 100" head is new for me and I was going to guess around 60. I admittedly hit with one only briefly before catching them on a great sale but it seems like a nice solid transition to a little larger, lighter frame-- very comfy and maneuverable without being too drastic a jump from something more traditional.

I'm a fan of the grip and cosmetics, too. The Fischers seem like a nice compromise between the Volkl thud and the more pingy crispness of some of the Yonexes I've hit. I'm thinking about trying a leather grip for a little added weight and slight balance change. I hope it doesn't make it too whippy.

Gaines Hillix
04-02-2006, 02:57 PM
I have used a 110 since the days of the infamous Prince aluminum 1976 innovation. I still remember being told it was illegal. It made a big improvement in my game.
I have continued using a 110 for 30 years. The last 20 I have used a PS 7.0 which has a flex rating of 55 and has considerable fiberglass content. I don't know about fatigue but it is horrible on volleys (as am I) and my serves are probably 10-15 miles slower than when I use a stiffer racquet of todays standards.
My question is this.. I am so used to the big sweet spot but I would like to change to a smaller head which will give me more snap and a crisper feeling. I am worried about losing the larger sweetspot that usually comes with a 110 head.
Can somebody tell me if it is possible to have a smaller head (98-100) and still have a sweetspot as large as on my PS 7.0. Any recommendations would be appreciated. I cannot stand the wide beam, superstiff 9-10 oz racquets.

Sorry for the long winded post

Ken, I am not sure anything smaller is going to have a sweetspot as large as your 7.0, but I've found a good compromise for a decent sized sweetspot and good maneuvarability on volleys is a 100" head. My hisotry is similar to yours and I now use a PK Laver Type S in a standard length.

Bottle Rocket
04-02-2006, 03:43 PM
kenshireen,

You should definitely check out the new Prince rackets with the O-port technology. Either that technology really works or there is something else under the skin doing the job. Either way, it definitely has an enlarged sweet spot (Yeah, I know a sweet spot really is only a "spot"). Especially the top of the hoop. It seems there are no dead spots.

Babolat rackets, especially the Pure Drive, are actually pretty soft and "sweet" feeling all around. They are extremely stiff rackets though, it's a feel that's very hard to describe.