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View Full Version : How can 11.2 oz be heavy?


johndagolfer
04-04-2006, 10:22 AM
People say that Fed's racquet is heavy at 12 ounces, yet a racquet like the flexpoint Instinct from head is too light. Are they talking about swing weight?
What causes the swing weight of one racquet to be heavier than another? Balance?

Thanks,

John

calabi12
04-04-2006, 10:33 AM
If the Flexpoint Instinct is too light, check the specs of the Flexpoint Radicals. They weigh the same as the Instinct, all at 11.1 or 11.2 oz strung, except the FXP Rad Tour, which is 12 oz strung.

As to your question about swingweight, it has to be weight distribuition either towards the handls or the head of the racquet.

Do a search on swingweight and you will find numerous threads on the subject.

Grimjack
04-04-2006, 12:05 PM
It's all marketing.

The appreciable difference between a swingweight of 300 and a swingweight of 400, or between 11 oz. static weight and 14 oz static weight, is practically zero.

The physiology of the average ten year old is well-enough developed to handle even the bulkiest tennis racquet with ease.

SteveI
04-04-2006, 12:31 PM
It's all marketing.

The appreciable difference between a swingweight of 300 and a swingweight of 400, or between 11 oz. static weight and 14 oz static weight, is practically zero.

The physiology of the average ten year old is well-enough developed to handle even the bulkiest tennis racquet with ease.


Really???

Bora
04-04-2006, 12:45 PM
It's all marketing.

The appreciable difference between a swingweight of 300 and a swingweight of 400, or between 11 oz. static weight and 14 oz static weight, is practically zero.

The physiology of the average ten year old is well-enough developed to handle even the bulkiest tennis racquet with ease.

Forget the 10 year old, can you actually play and win a 4.0 level match with a 14 ounce 400 swingweight racquet?

Yeah, thought so.

Pomeranian
04-04-2006, 03:49 PM
I would agree with the measure of two swingweights having the same static weight, the difference is small. However the difference in static weight to be larger. A lot of people see the opposite. But I wouldn't reccomend a racquet by swingweight for a child. I would reccomend by static weight before swingweight. Wouldn't you agree? I mean they swing pretty slow, a light (static) bulky racquet with weight concentrated on the head compared to a a heavy (static) with a lower swingweight. Which one would you choose?

MTChong
04-04-2006, 04:23 PM
Forget the 10 year old, can you actually play and win a 4.0 level match with a 14 ounce 400 swingweight racquet?

Yeah, thought so.

He never said play well; I believe he is just stating that the human body can handle such racquets.

LowProfile
04-04-2006, 04:48 PM
There isn't much noticeable difference between a few ounces of weight at first, but someone who is used to a 10-11 oz racquet and tries playing a few sets with a 12+ oz racquet will quickly find themselves tiring much faster than before. It's not to say that they can't use the racquet, but a heavier racquet will require additional physical ability to effectively use for longer periods of time.

That being said, I still don't believe anyone should be using a racquet under 10 oz for safety reasons. Those things are just too dangerous on the arm.

Tezuka Kunimitsu
04-04-2006, 06:12 PM
example. I used a racket with 9.2 oz (could play nice two hours of tennis) then started using flxp prestige and I found myself tired in 30 mins. Which showed that my weak part of my game is my foot work. I just could not get in place to take my full swings. Weight does matter pretty much.