PDA

View Full Version : New Player with Pro racquet


Topherstein
04-10-2006, 06:40 PM
I was at the sporting good store and I found a Head Liquidmetal Prestige for $99. I bought because I knew this is a $200 racquet. I have played tennis some and I am compitent at hitting the ball over the net and in play. Is it realistic that I can learn using this racquet?

vinnier6
04-10-2006, 06:45 PM
i guess you could, but the problem with people wanting to learn how to play tennis with a players stick is that in the beginning you wont be using a full swing, instead you will be learning to develope your stroke over time and practice... and with a players stick, the ball wont be going anywhere without a big swing...you need to learn how to walk before you can run!! that being said you made a good purchase...

SFrazeur
04-10-2006, 06:48 PM
Q:25-30 years ago what would one call a new player with a pro racquet?
(a 12 ounce plus, small sized head racquet)

A: ...A guy with racquet!

Topherstein
04-10-2006, 06:50 PM
I'm 16, 6'1 and coordinated. Video games help you know.

Bora
04-10-2006, 06:57 PM
don't worry about it. just string it looser, as a big young buck you'll get all the power you need.

Topherstein
04-10-2006, 06:57 PM
it was stringed at 57 lbs. How is that?

Court_Jester
04-10-2006, 07:15 PM
The problem with a new player using a player's racquet is that these are racquets designed for people who have already mastered the fundamentals and techniques. Without them, the use of these low-powered racquets will make their game ineffective and definitely frustrating. Now, I'm not saying that you shouldn't use it but expect the learning curve to be quite steep for a racquet like the LM Prestige. On the upside, it'll force you to learn the proper techniques early on, which in the long run will be beneficial.

Topherstein
04-10-2006, 07:20 PM
Thanks for all the help, I am up for any advice I can get. A big thanks to everyone who has posted. Please, keep posting.

Court_Jester
04-10-2006, 07:25 PM
it was stringed at 57 lbs. How is that?
So it's strung at midrange. Next time you re-string it, try something like 53 or 54 lbs. Lowering the tension will raise the power.

Topherstein
04-10-2006, 09:03 PM
any other suggestions? Where would I get replacement parts? It is possible to replace the plastic strip that runs around the head?

TENNIS_IS_FUN
04-10-2006, 10:01 PM
i have a question...where did you buy your prestiege -_-

Bora
04-11-2006, 06:09 AM
any other suggestions? Where would I get replacement parts? It is possible to replace the plastic strip that runs around the head?

Those are called CAP grommets. Your stringer can order and replace them. If not, you can order them from TW or other online retailers.

Here is the thing, I see many new players with these big powerful racquets who just tap the ball to get it over the net. This doesn't do anything for those player's technique. If you enjoy tennis and want to get good at it, stick with your Prestige for a while. Like they mentioned before string it something like 53-54 pounds for a bit more forgiveness and power.

vinnier6
04-11-2006, 08:26 AM
the best way i can put your situation in terms you might understand, its kind of like learning to fly in an f16 vrs a cessna 152...or learning to drive in a ferrari vrs a honda civic...you gotta learn first then move up...

a kid at my club who is like 15 is trying to learn how to play tennis with a wilson n61 tour 90...its pretty funny watching him try to make good contact with the ball with a stick that he is not ready for yet...i see him taking a very long time to learn something that could take him far less time with a different stick...

thinkhard
04-11-2006, 08:37 AM
I actually think that it's great that you're learning on a prestige. You're at a good age where power really won't be an issue as much as developing a good stroke. The prestige will force you to use good strokes and will help you increase your consistancy. If you don't feel comfortable using it, you can buy a beginner's racquet from Wal-Mart or a different department store, but you won't need to use it for long. Just make sure to get the racquet fixed and you should be fine. Good luck!

Bora
04-11-2006, 09:06 AM
the best way i can put your situation in terms you might understand, its kind of like learning to fly in an f16 vrs a cessna 152...or learning to drive in a ferrari vrs a honda civic...you gotta learn first then move up...

a kid at my club who is like 15 is trying to learn how to play tennis with a wilson n61 tour 90...its pretty funny watching him try to make good contact with the ball with a stick that he is not ready for yet...i see him taking a very long time to learn something that could take him far less time with a different stick...

Funny thing is, I learned to play tennis at age 10 with a racquet that had a smaller head than the Tour 90. I don't remember struggling that much then, infact I made it to the team in a short amount of time. Perhaps, your 15 year old is an uncoordinated clutz, in which case maybe you should suggest him a Gamma Big Bubba.

Oh, and the first time I flew a plane it was a fighter trainer, not a Cessna. As long as it flies, it makes no difference. Same with racquets, as long as you can hit the ball with it then go for it.

cabernetjunkie
04-11-2006, 09:23 AM
Have you hit with the prestige yet, if so, how did you like it?

Extremebb300
04-11-2006, 09:34 AM
I started off with a Wilson Photon Havoc Zone.....LOL is was only $10 at Walmart.

Topherstein
04-11-2006, 10:20 AM
I can't play with my racquet until Sunday. I bought it at Chick's. I think they are closing out liquidmetal. Would you all recommend I put tape over the grommet to prevent scuffs? I would use a good tape that wouldn't leave residue of course. Any other tecniques in using a prestige that would help me?

Galactus
04-11-2006, 10:35 AM
Same here - I learnt how to hit a tennis ball back in the 70s/80s with a Donnay Allwood Borg racquet and my Dad's Dunlop Maxply Fort: both 70" heads and both weighed about 14oz!

If you find your Head LM Prestige too tricky to use at first - keep it....but test-drive a less-demanding racquet.

bee
04-11-2006, 10:51 AM
Great racquet! I didn't notice if this is the mid or the midplus version. Either way it's okay. I think the midplus is a fine racquet for a beginner. I use the mid version and string it with natural gut plus string savers and it's the best I've found for my game.

Tennis is a good lifelong game. Enjoy! / Bee

Grimjack
04-11-2006, 10:51 AM
As a learning player, you are bound to have flaws in your game. This is unavoidable.

If the primary flaw in your game is that you tend to hit the ball back over the net, but you tend to hit it really short and really soft, then I can say without hesitation that the LMP is wrong for you. For this sort of physically deficient bunter, the bigger, stiffer "game improvement" racquet is a godsend. It gives you automatic adjustments toward depth and power -- with no additional effort required on your part to add these.

If your errors are of any other sort -- if you spray balls around too much, or hit too long, for example -- then the Prestige isn't going to be holding you back, because the flaws in your game aren't the ones that would be addressed by a beginner's racquet, anyway. In that case, use it with confidence, and enjoy!

Grimjack
04-11-2006, 10:53 AM
(All of which is to say: for most people the Prestige is fine. From 1.0 to 7.0. As long as you're not physically incapable of using it. Which you're clearly not.)

Topherstein
04-11-2006, 10:57 AM
Thank You. If I take lessons, will I be okay with the prestige or should I get a less expensive racquet to learn with? How much does a prestige lose string tension?

Ripper
04-11-2006, 11:05 AM
Would you all recommend I put tape over the grommet to prevent scuffs? I would use a good tape that wouldn't leave residue of course.

Head makes a head tape that's supposed to be good. Use that one and keep it all in the same family :)

Ripper
04-11-2006, 11:09 AM
Thank You. If I take lessons, will I be okay with the prestige or should I get a less expensive racquet to learn with?

I think what most people are saying here is that you can learn with the one you've got and that there might, even, be some advantages in doing so. Personally, I think it depends on you. I don't know you. So, I can't say. Anyway, the answer is yes, take your lessons with it.

How much does a prestige lose string tension?

It depends on what it was strung with. If it's a basic solid core string, it should last you quite a bit.

Topherstein
04-11-2006, 02:16 PM
Any other modifications any of you would recommend with the prestige?

meh
04-11-2006, 02:21 PM
Don't worry about any modifications. Just get it strung with a 17g multi at mid tension, and go out and learn the game before you worry about the equipment. Also, I wouldn't recommend using head-guard tape...just replacing the CAPs when they're dead is eventually more cost-effective than spending money to tape up the grommets, since the grommets will eventually need replacing anyways, and the tape increases the SW, which would be detrimental to you at this stage.

ta11geese3
04-11-2006, 02:47 PM
As a learning player, you are bound to have flaws in your game. This is unavoidable.

If the primary flaw in your game is that you tend to hit the ball back over the net, but you tend to hit it really short and really soft, then I can say without hesitation that the LMP is wrong for you. For this sort of physically deficient bunter, the bigger, stiffer "game improvement" racquet is a godsend. It gives you automatic adjustments toward depth and power -- with no additional effort required on your part to add these.


How is that going to help your technique though =[

Skppr05
04-11-2006, 03:31 PM
get a more begginer racquet and when you get better try hitting with the prestige. Great buy by the way

Topherstein
04-11-2006, 05:41 PM
what would be a good beginner racquet?

tonysk83
04-11-2006, 07:11 PM
If you start with a more player geared racquet your strokes will develop slower but you will learn to use your body and not just your harm. I see so many kids start with Head Ti's that require them to just use their arm to get it back, but if more kids would use less powerful racquets, after a year or two their strokes will be so much better. Stick with the prestige, you'll be fine on it.

tennis4losers
04-11-2006, 09:34 PM
I'm 16, 6'1 and coordinated. Video games help you know.

Dude....You crack me up

Duzza
04-12-2006, 01:05 AM
Have you hit with the prestige yet, if so, how did you like it?
what difference would it make? everyone knows a beginner couldnt care how the racquet feels or whether it is good or not

Duzza
04-12-2006, 01:07 AM
Thank You. If I take lessons, will I be okay with the prestige or should I get a less expensive racquet to learn with? How much does a prestige lose string tension?
i think you got the less expensive racquet part right... 99 bucks is an absolute bargain. just play with it, shouldnt be to hard on you coz ur 16 nd 6'1''. if you do decide to get a beginner racquet make sure you keep it till your more experienced u will not regret it

Topherstein
04-12-2006, 05:04 AM
I will not get rid of my prestige. I actually should go buy another.

Ripper
04-12-2006, 07:11 AM
Also, I wouldn't recommend using head-guard tape...just replacing the CAPs when they're dead is eventually more cost-effective than spending money to tape up the grommets, since the grommets will eventually need replacing anyways, and the tape increases the SW, which would be detrimental to you at this stage.

Yes, head tape will increase your swingweight by .000001 points and 5 bucks is too much money. So, don't use it. Replacing grommets is a pain in the behind, but it's entertaining. So, anything you can do to speed up the need to replace them, go for it.

cabernetjunkie
04-12-2006, 07:25 AM
what difference would it make? everyone knows a beginner couldnt care how the racquet feels or whether it is good or not

---OK:confused:

ragnaROK
04-12-2006, 07:28 AM
People used to learn tennis in the olden days off wooden rackets so it's not impossible for a beginner to start with a Prestige. Just hit with it. It'll be harder at first but in the long run you'll have better stroke mechanics with the Prestige.

Topherstein
04-12-2006, 09:40 AM
what can I do to prevent damage to my racquet? What would be the best activity I could do to improve my skill?

Ripper
04-12-2006, 09:45 AM
what can I do to prevent damage to my racquet?

Have it always strung by a stringer who knows what he's doing. Keep it out of extreme heat. Don't throw it around... Common sense.

What would be the best activity I could do to improve my skill?

Tennis classes, as well as lots of matches and practice, in general!

Topherstein
04-12-2006, 09:50 AM
I talked to the guy who strung my racquet. He said he had done it for 2 years. It took him around 40 minutes to string it. I'm sure he knew what he was doing. I treat my racquets well, but are their areas prone to damage?

stevewcosta
04-12-2006, 12:43 PM
Don't stress so much about damage etc. Like others have commented, just don't throw it, hit anything intentionally other than a tennis ball and don't store it in your car trunk in summer or winter. Now, go play 4 or 5 times a week for an hr. or 2 and you'll see rapid improvement.

vinnier6
04-12-2006, 08:17 PM
Funny thing is, I learned to play tennis at age 10 with a racquet that had a smaller head than the Tour 90. I don't remember struggling that much then, infact I made it to the team in a short amount of time. Perhaps, your 15 year old is an uncoordinated clutz, in which case maybe you should suggest him a Gamma Big Bubba.

Oh, and the first time I flew a plane it was a fighter trainer, not a Cessna. As long as it flies, it makes no difference. Same with racquets, as long as you can hit the ball with it then go for it.
ahh, you must be like top gun...but being around the aviation world for many many years i am going to call bull s h i t on you...even the military starts their pilots out in props...

Topherstein
04-13-2006, 03:38 PM
Thanks for everything guys, only 3 more days until I can use my prestige!

Bora
04-13-2006, 06:17 PM
ahh, you must be like top gun...but being around the aviation world for many many years i am going to call bull s h i t on you...even the military starts their pilots out in props...

I said fighter trainer, never did I say a jet. In fact the same day I flew one of those, I flew a Cessna later on, guess which one was a bigger pain in the ass? The Cessna flew like it was gonna fall out of the sky, the trainer flew like you could do anything. Even as a beginner, I preferred the joystick controls to the damn wheel thing.

The point is you are trying to tell someone its too much a stick for them, and I call BS on that.

bluegrasser
04-14-2006, 07:56 AM
The racquet will be fine, shoot you're young enough to handle a players stick and it will be better in the long run.

astra
04-14-2006, 08:32 AM
Topherstein, I like your determination. Once I bought a racquet (Wilson PSC 6.1), which did not suite to my (far from today´s level) game. I hated it the first month and realized to ged rid of it. I did not do that and eventually, I adjusted my game to the racquet and now I use to say that the racquet taught me to play tennis.
I think 57 lbs is more than enough, if harsh, you can try 56or even less. This tension is my first attempt in LM Prestige+ (PolyPlasma 1.28/16g), it seems ok. No more is needed now.
Good luck.

astra
04-14-2006, 08:40 AM
Your buy is great. Have it for approx. 150 USD and still happy. It seems racquets in the US can be (esp. if sold-out) much cheaper than in Europe.
I envy:D

chess9
04-14-2006, 09:04 AM
If you start with a more player geared racquet your strokes will develop slower but you will learn to use your body and not just your harm. I see so many kids start with Head Ti's that require them to just use their arm to get it back, but if more kids would use less powerful racquets, after a year or two their strokes will be so much better. Stick with the prestige, you'll be fine on it.

This guy's a genius! :) I fully agree with him. My 4'10" grandmother learned to play with a 14 oz racquet. Just get some lessons from a good pro and you will be fine. That's a great racquet and would be my stick but for the grip shape.

-Robert
________
UGGS (http://uggstoreshop.com/)

Topherstein
04-14-2006, 11:49 AM
Thanks, now I'm sure to stick with my Prestige and since its the MP I'm in even better shape!

eLterrible
04-14-2006, 12:00 PM
go and buy a $20 wallmart racquet and play with that for about 2 months while improving your strokes, then when you hit the point where you feel that you have full consistent swings, start using the prestige and smash the wallmart racquet during a match.

Fumoffu
04-14-2006, 12:46 PM
^^^ lol, do people honestly do that?

Topherstein
04-14-2006, 03:25 PM
I should go find a used 'tweener and use it for a while.