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View Full Version : Racquets from small companies?


Caswell
04-11-2006, 04:48 AM
How (un)common are racquets from regional manufacturers?

I've got a racquet from the early nineties from a company called "Ellipse" - the only other mention of that company I've found on this forum is from someone else from the Orlando area. It's a professional looking job - nice paint job, came with a nice full length cover, etc.

My understanding was that they went out of business in pretty short order (I guess you could expect that of a company who's only mention to date is in the "Worst Racquets Ever" thread). I personally haven't seen a lot of racquets from small, regional manufacturers - is that truly an oddity?

Marius_Hancu
04-11-2006, 06:57 AM
take care of your health first:

FWIW
check my posting here:

Best arm friendly racquets?
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=77937

Ripper
04-11-2006, 07:44 AM
take care of your health first:

FWIW
check my posting here:

Best arm friendly racquets?
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=77937

Sometimes, I get the creepy feeling that there's a computer somewhere (permanently "on"), runned by a robot or a software, that's programed to, automatically, generate these replies, when it detects a post here, containing a specific wording or something, lol.

PS: I'm just joking, Marius...

ollinger
04-11-2006, 07:52 AM
Really, Marius, wipe the oatmeal off your chin....What exactly are you responding to in his post??
________
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d_frank
04-11-2006, 08:00 AM
Like 70% of his posts are that response :p

Mugatu
04-11-2006, 04:04 PM
try upwards of 90%..!!

ta11geese3
04-11-2006, 04:28 PM
I think he has a word document open next to his browser. When he sees a new topic, he finds a related response, and copies and pastes it.

Caswell
04-11-2006, 05:01 PM
LOL... well, given its weight and relatively narrow beam, it may just be arm-friendly. Who knows...

Anyway, got bored and thought it may be more interesting with a picture. It's the only oversize racquet I own, so I figure the wife may inherit it once she graduates from her Wal-Mart special.

http://img77.imageshack.us/img77/6181/dsc052389wr.jpg

tarkowski
04-11-2006, 05:36 PM
Sometimes, I get the creepy feeling that there's a computer somewhere (permanently "on"), runned by a robot or a software, that's programed to, automatically, generate these replies, when it detects a post here, containing a specific wording or something, lol.

PS: I'm just joking, Marius...

Good one Ripper, too funny. No ridicule intended Marius - just fun. The fact that we pick up on this probably means we're spending too much time on this board as well.

Some potential 'bot' activation words:

racquet
head-heavy
light
beginner
elbow
arm

slice bh compliment
04-11-2006, 05:45 PM
Ellipse frames were well designed and well made. I did not consider them to be total widebodies for their time...maybe you would call them mid-profile?

If I recall, they tried to use fewer drill holes at 10 and 2 o'clock for stability. Unfortunately, this meant a couple of shared holes. Some stringers did not like that too much. I guess the company came and went. Maybe Wilson or Prince bought them out. Who knows? I know buy-outs sometimes happen with bag and grip makers when they do a little too well in their first two years.

slice bh compliment
04-11-2006, 05:50 PM
... "Worst Racquets Ever" ...

I do not think Ellipse qualifies, but as for some lesser known racketmakers:

Zebra, Zebest, Cayman, Avery, Durbin, Yamaha, Stolle/Emerson Tennis [SET], Lacoste, Tecnifibre, Major, Tyger. There must be more.

Caswell
04-11-2006, 06:57 PM
Ellipse frames were well designed and well made. I did not consider them to be total widebodies for their time...maybe you would call them mid-profile?

If I recall, they tried to use fewer drill holes at 10 and 2 o'clock for stability. Unfortunately, this meant a couple of shared holes. Some stringers did not like that too much. I guess the company came and went. Maybe Wilson or Prince bought them out. Who knows? I know buy-outs sometimes happen with bag and grip makers when they do a little too well in their first two years.

Ah, cool, so someone does remember them. I wouldn't classify the one pictured above as a widebody - the frame isn't much wider than my M-Fil 300's. You're right about having a lot of shared holes.

I don't remember it being a bad racquet. It was good enough at the time to look for a spare once I started hitting with enough topspin to break strings quickly. By that time they weren't in production any more, and I became a steady Dunlop customer since my teaching pro was sponsored by them and he'd throw a deal or two my way.

string70
04-11-2006, 07:47 PM
LOL... well, given its weight and relatively narrow beam, it may just be arm-friendly. Who knows...

Anyway, got bored and thought it may be more interesting with a picture. It's the only oversize racquet I own, so I figure the wife may inherit it once she graduates from her Wal-Mart special.

http://img77.imageshack.us/img77/6181/dsc052389wr.jpg

You know if your not using those Select Pro's (and they are Mids) I have rackets to trade and cash!!:)

Court_Jester
04-11-2006, 07:57 PM
take care of your health first:

FWIW
check my posting here:

Best arm friendly racquets?
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=77937
As much as this thread has been very useful to me and partly responsible for my switch to Volkl, I don't see how this is related to the original post at all. I even searched within the thread for the word "Ellipse" and didn't find it. So I'm with the other posters here.