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View Full Version : Love my new racquet, but I can't serve with it - Any suggestions?


travlerajm
04-15-2006, 07:12 PM
deleted by author.

J-man
04-15-2006, 07:51 PM
.

I've never been an accurate server (I used to double fault a lot unless I was playing at least 3 times a week). But with my Prostaff 4.7, hitting monster kick serves always seemed effortless. When I was playing 4+ times/week, I could hammer kick serves in at about 110 mph, and the ball would hit 6-8 feet high on the back fence. Because I could hit so much spin and pace, it felt like I was pounding overheads from the service line. And many opponents used to comment that they'd never played against someone who served with such "downward angle" (I like to make contact with my feet 8 inches off the ground). Basically, I had pro-caliber spin and pace, but not pro-caliber accuracy - a solid 5.5 power-server - same serve for 1st and 2nd.

i know this has nothing to do with your serving problem but i have to say. damn your good!!!!!!

Davai
04-15-2006, 08:34 PM
That's a big kick serve. Unfortunately I haven't found a way to make the NXG a super sweet serving frame but I think that some lead tape at the 12 o'clock position will make a big difference.

travlerajm
04-15-2006, 08:40 PM
Thanks. I haven't tried weight at 12 yet. I'll try it. I doubt that I can add more than a gram of 2 there without sacrificing the sweet feel on the groundies.

TENNIS_IS_FUN
04-15-2006, 08:50 PM
I had the same problem, and a temporary solution for me was serving with as much confidence as possible...i mean, i had to be COMPLETELY in my zone, not holding anything back to consistently serve with the nxg OS...works for me

vinky
04-15-2006, 11:15 PM
Why don't you mess around and customize it a little? Maybe try out different strings, find the perfect setup that gives you confidence in your serve.

tennisadict
04-15-2006, 11:17 PM
with that level you shouldnt have a problem with your serve

travlerajm
04-15-2006, 11:35 PM
I had the same problem, and a temporary solution for me was serving with as much confidence as possible...i mean, i had to be COMPLETELY in my zone, not holding anything back to consistently serve with the nxg OS...works for me

I'm glad to see I'm not alone. I also find that serving with confidence is the only way to go with this racquet. Babying it just seems to make the problem worse.

Did you stick with the NXG OS?

Galactus
04-16-2006, 01:57 AM
travlerajm, what happens when you revert back to your Wilson Prostaff from using the Prince NXG? Do your serves have the same kick/power as you always had?

netman
04-16-2006, 05:23 AM
You are making a number of changes in critical variables all at once. Much thinner frame, much heavier weight, differences in swing weight, balance, etc. Since you state your serve is based on precise timing, thats a lot to throw at your muscle memory all at once. And you haven't even mentioned strings yet. :)

I suspect that your service motion is tuned to using the lighter weight and swingweight of the PS to generate the big time racquet head speed and wrist snap you needed to hit your massive kick serves. The wider beam probably did some of the work for you as well. I can't comment on how good a serving racquet the NXG is, but assuming it is, its just going to take some time for you to adjust to all the changes. Might also be interesting to get something with a beam width in the 21-22mm range and try it out against the NXG. That would be less of a transition than the one you are trying to make right now.

-k-

Kevo
04-16-2006, 05:41 AM
A 5.0 with a solid 5.5 power serve who now can't serve with a different racquet??? I'm wondering if you just needed something to read today.

Grimjack
04-16-2006, 06:29 AM
Any suggestions?

...

...hitting monster kick serves always seemed effortless. When I was playing 4+ times/week, I could hammer kick serves in at about 110 mph, and the ball would hit 6-8 feet high on the back fence. Because I could hit so much spin and pace, it felt like I was pounding overheads from the service line. And many opponents used to comment that they'd never played against someone who served with such "downward angle" (I like to make contact with my feet 8 inches off the ground). Basically, I had pro-caliber spin and pace, but not pro-caliber accuracy - a solid 5.5 power-server - same serve for 1st and 2nd.


Suggestion: stop deluding yourself.

It's *possible* you may be the first 5.0 in the history of the world to hammer 110 mph kick serves 8 feet up the back fence, but it's not ####ing likely. But if you were, you'd sure as hell be able to serve just fine with a fishing net, never mind the NXG.

equinox
04-16-2006, 08:47 AM
Lol, 110 kick serve nice...I can only suggest you dump the pog fake nxg and use the Head TiS6 oversize rackets.

Then you can serve 130 kick serve! 10ft into the back fencing.

travlerajm
04-17-2006, 06:48 PM
I solved my problem today! I suspected that my serving woes with the NXG might have to do with the racquet mass not being tuned right for a high angular momentum shot like a 100+ mph kick serve. By comparison, groundstrokes, which are relatively low angular momentum shots, seem to be nicely tuned in the NXG in stock form.

After reading a lot of the posts on this forum, I got intrigued in particular by the method of John Cauthen, where he uses a concentrated mass in the "hilt" to tune the racquet. The NXG felt a little light in the hilt area, so I thought the Cauthen weighting method might work with this racquet.

I did only slight tweaking. First I added 2g wrapped around the top of the hilt. And Voila - much better control on the serve, but still best results with 1/4 choke-up. I added another 2g - and WOW! I could get my kicker hitting 6+ feet up on the fence again! And it no longer seemed necessary to choke up. However, this extra 4g in the hilt seemed to flatten out my groundstrokes a little more than I liked. I subtracted a gram (to 3g), and the serve still felt like it had almost as much pop as with 4g, and I still seemed to retain enough targeting in the groundies (I was testing against a wall - still haven't hit against another player with it yet). This modification definitely adds some power to groundies, so I'll have to play a match with it to see if the extra power is better or worse for my game.

I think the dramatic effect on the serve of adding a few grams in the hilt is due not only to the weight distribution, but also to the fact that it changes the kinetics of the flex of the racquet. I was amazed that this small mount of tweaking so close to the axis of rotation could make such a huge difference. My serve went from being completely unreliable to giving me a predictable ball response with massive power and spin. In other words, all the energy I was putting into the racquet is now transferring to the ball (like it used to when I played with the Prostaff 4.7), when before my modification that was not the case with the NXG. I may not have added an arrowhead-shaped 44-g weight to my hilt, but I must say that I'm definitely a believer in the ways of John Cauthen now.

Ripper
04-18-2006, 05:20 AM
This month, I finally found a stick that generally gives me as much control as my Prostaff 4.7 - The Prince Graphite NXG OS. In fact, there are some things about it that are superior to my old racquet. For one, the NXG weighs about an ounce more than the Prostaff 4.7, which really helps give it added stability on my returns and volleys. And the thinner beam (19mm vs 24mm) makes it great for dippers and ripping heavy topspin drives (the Prostaff played between a tweener and a player's racquet, spinwise).

I love the NXG except for one big problem - My serve sucks with this racquet.

As I'm sure you already know, there's a Midsize NXG, a Midplus NXG and an Oversize NXG. Fyi, the Midsize has an 18mm beam, the Midplus has a 19mm beam and the Oversize has a 20mm beam.

Regarding your serving problem, I'm sure it's just a matter of getting the swing timing right with the new raquet. This is accomplished only(*) by tons of practice. It's easy to adjust groundstrokes swings between different raquets. However, serving is always going to require more time, imho.

Edit: (*) or simply by balancing and weighting the new raquet, if posible, to make it similar to the old one.

Ripper
04-18-2006, 05:28 AM
...but I must say that I'm definitely a believer in the ways of John Cauthen now.

Lol!

Anyway, in relation to customizing the balance and weight of a raquet, yes, you can take two different raquets and make them feel similar. In other words, when changing raquets, instead of getting used to the new one, you can try to make the new one similar to the old one. MAYBE, this is what you're doing (sorry, but I just don't feel like reading your long post in detail, at this moment). Hth.