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View Full Version : Pro Staff 6.0 versus modern racquets


Fetus Gerulaitis
04-15-2006, 08:18 PM
I am a 4.5 - 5.0 player, who plays a lot of doubles, but have been trying to play more singles recently with mixed results. In any case, I would like to improve my singles game. Today, I played singles for a team that I am on and I lost 0 and 0 to some guy. It was a lot closer than that, acutally (ahem), but, whatever, I got crushed. Anyway, the guy tells me after the match that he had played, previously with a Pro Staff 6.0 and now uses one of the Babolats and it basically changed his life. He said that modern racquets are much better, etc. I did feel as though he had a lot of time to field my shots and I had very little. I am thinking at looking at modern racquets. Any advice?

Davai
04-15-2006, 08:26 PM
Tell us more about the game of your opponent. I had a similiar experience where I also got crushed but the guy just sliced and diced everything to the corners, he had that much practice at it. The guy was just super consistent and I wasn't playing any good that day. Anyhow I doubt its the racket's fault.

Fetus Gerulaitis
04-15-2006, 08:34 PM
My opponent was getting everything back and it seemed as though I could end the point and, admittedly, I was trying to end them maybe too soon. A lot of the games were very close. Basically, he was a baseliner that was getting everything in with pretty decent pace. In fact, I cant think of anything that he did that was spectacular besides good consistency and putting away the easy balls. I didnt play my best match and am recovering from the flu, but whatever, that was a bad showing on my part.

Fetus Gerulaitis
04-15-2006, 08:35 PM
"it seemed as though I could not end the point . . . "

Fetus Gerulaitis
04-15-2006, 08:36 PM
Also, the guy was convinced I needed a new racquet and showed me a bunch of his old Pro Staffs in his bag and swore up and down that a new racquet would make a big difference.

ta11geese3
04-15-2006, 09:03 PM
You gonna tell us what racquet you use yourself?

Pomeranian
04-15-2006, 10:29 PM
Depends on the player's preferences. Though the technology of old racquets and newer ones aren't so different, I agrue a downfall with some of hese stiffer racquets. Compare the "ncode" 90 to the pro staff 85. Of course they hit a little differently but which one would play better depends on the preferences of the player.

A change from the 85 to a babolat is very dramatic. Maybe he was just late on every shot and now with a lighter racquet he catches the ball early as he should.

Galactus
04-16-2006, 02:02 AM
I am a 4.5 - 5.0 player, who plays a lot of doubles, but have been trying to play more singles recently with mixed results. In any case, I would like to improve my singles game. Today, I played singles for a team that I am on and I lost 0 and 0 to some guy. It was a lot closer than that, acutally (ahem), but, whatever, I got crushed. Anyway, the guy tells me after the match that he had played, previously with a Pro Staff 6.0 and now uses one of the Babolats and it basically changed his life. He said that modern racquets are much better, etc. I did feel as though he had a lot of time to field my shots and I had very little. I am thinking at looking at modern racquets. Any advice?
Same here - I used a Prostaff Original 6.0 85 for the last 8 months and tested a Babolat PD+ 2 weeks ago - I liked it so much, I went and bought one myself.
I feel using the Prostaff with such a smaller-head in comparison makes me play better when I used the PD+.
Whether it's overall, a better racquet or not, I'm not advanced enough to make such a statement!

Fetus Gerulaitis
04-16-2006, 08:30 AM
"You gonna tell us what racquet you use yourself?"

I use a Pro Staff 6.0

Roforot
04-16-2006, 09:11 AM
It all depends on your style of play. I played and lost to a good player using an ntour? or something like that. His pace and heavy shots were tough to fight off; sort of like taking bodyblows in boxing. However, he was using it as a "break" to take it easy. When he used his regular frame he lost a little pace/spin but was placing his shots a lot closer and had fewer mishits... it felt like he was slicing/dissecting my game apart.
So basically he would beat me w/ either frame just in different ways.
I use Yonex srdtour 90; a tweener may have helped me gainst his spinny/heavy ntours, but wouldn't have done anything against his regular frame.

Marius_Hancu
04-16-2006, 12:37 PM
"You gonna tell us what racquet you use yourself?"

I use a Pro Staff 6.0

try ncode 6.1 90 and 95
or
Fisched M-Speed

FWIW
check my posting here:

Best arm friendly racquets?
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=77937

Saito
04-16-2006, 12:51 PM
My situation is backwards from that guy... I used the PD when I came back into tennis from a 4 year hiatus. In a few months, I was back to hitting with my PS 6.0 85. But everyone is different... I prefer control-oriented sticks.

sureshs
04-16-2006, 01:48 PM
Opponents with lighter racquets can surprise you by the depth of their shots. I use the NCode 95, and have seen some guys with the N5 oversize who just touch the ball and it lands deep. It is easy for an advanced player to put away those balls, but 3.5 or 4.0 guys struggle. But the light-racquet guys often have arm problems and also they hit many shots out - eventually you will win.

You might experiment with something in the 11 to 11.5 oz range, like O3 white, Hybrid Shark, Technifiber 315, NPro Open, etc. They are 98 or 100 inch heads, headlight, but still can be swung easily. Unlike lighter racquets of yesteryear, they (I know about the Princes only) are pretty comfortable and stable. If you are not hitting heavy balls with the players sticks anyways, why pay the penalty of weight and swingweight? I myself am demoing the O3 White now and liking it. But comfort is the key. The almost identical Hybrid Shark is also in my demo collection now, but it is harsher and I won't be considering it. That is what put me off lighter racquets couple of years ago.

Babs are a big shift. They are very stiff and I have demoed several models and given up. The players stick logic applies here too - if you can't hit heavy topspin with these Babs, why pay the penalty of stiffness?

highsierra
04-16-2006, 01:52 PM
Most of the balls are played from the baseline these days. head sizes of 85 and even 90 are not best suited for baseline games if everything else being equal. Particularly for top spin shots, the ball slides on the string bed during the contact, which requires a larger area/sweet spot to work with.

If you play a S/V style (since you've played double mostly), then it's less of an issue. The PS 85 may be the ideal weapon and you just need to play single more to get used to it.

Pancho
04-16-2006, 01:59 PM
I have seen Seniors play with 03 Sliver and Ncode1 and they play well with the sticks with little power and short backswings.

Saito
04-16-2006, 02:06 PM
I have seen Seniors play with 03 Sliver and Ncode1 and they play well with the sticks with little power and short backswings.

FTW?? err don't you mean lots of power, hence the necessity of a short backswing?? Or are you talking about something else?

Keifers
04-16-2006, 04:32 PM
I like Marius' suggestion of the nCode 6.1s and Fischer M Speed. Would be very interesting to hear your comments after demoing them. (TW has an excellent demo program; especially convenient given you live in SF.)

Another racquet I would recommend is the Pro Kennex Type R. This is a very fine lighter-weight racquet that still has a soft flex for excellent control. Stable hoop makes for solid volleys. Closer in weight to your 6.0 85, the Type C Redondo is a stable, flexy racquet. Well worth demoing.

Fetus Gerulaitis
04-16-2006, 07:23 PM
OK, so I checked the dude on USTA Northern California and he had entered a lot of tournaments between 1999 until 2006 and all of them were either Open, 5.5 or 5.0 tournaments, so I dont feel so bad. I am 4.5, 5.0 singles player and played pretty awful yesterday because I had the flu. I dont feel as bad now, but what is that jerkoff doing in the 4.5 is unclear to me. This is starting to make me somewhat mad because the last guy I had played in the same league had also played (and won a number of matches in) open tournaments. I will still take a look at the racquets mentioned.

The Ripper
04-16-2006, 08:33 PM
I played in a tournament a couple months ago and had the same experience. I was playing in the 3.5-4.0 group (B) but ended up playing a 5.0-5.5! He was a very nice guy, but I think I got about 2 points off of him. I didn't really mind, but asked the organizer about it later. He said they needed an extra player so just brought him in. Great!! Now if I could play guys like this on a regular basis I might really improve, but to get one once in a blue moon is quite a jolt to the system.

As far as rackets, I have also tried the lighter, bigger tweener rackets but realized, win or lose, I just have more fun playing with a slightly heavier "player's" racket with a midsize head. I keep the overall static weight around 12 oz. and swingweight in the 320's. In matches I think the tradeoff is using that added heaviness and control on the ball to keep them from dominating with the quicker "easier to play" racket. Can be frustrating, though. :rolleyes:

I'll bet you'll do better next time!!

goober
04-16-2006, 09:46 PM
OK, so I checked the dude on USTA Northern California and he had entered a lot of tournaments between 1999 until 2006 and all of them were either Open, 5.5 or 5.0 tournaments, so I dont feel so bad. I am 4.5, 5.0 singles player and played pretty awful yesterday because I had the flu. I dont feel as bad now, but what is that jerkoff doing in the 4.5 is unclear to me. This is starting to make me somewhat mad because the last guy I had played in the same league had also played (and won a number of matches in) open tournaments. I will still take a look at the racquets mentioned.

Welcome to USTA league sandbagging. Do a search on it there have been plenty of threads already about it.

rocket
04-17-2006, 04:08 AM
Also, the guy was convinced I needed a new racquet and showed me a bunch of his old Pro Staffs in his bag and swore up and down that a new racquet would make a big difference.

Funny how the guy was selling you on the merits of a new racquet, yet he was lugging those old PS's around with him... why the xtra weight?

rocket
04-17-2006, 04:27 AM
Anyway, the guy tells me after the match that he had played, previously with a Pro Staff 6.0 and now uses one of the Babolats and it basically changed his life. He said that modern racquets are much better, etc. Any advice?

Once you've played with a PS 85, you can practically play with any other stick with a fair amount of success. The PS 85 is so inherently low-powered that other racquets would immediately seem to add some zip to your shots.

Dunno what he means by "much better" when he talks about modern racquets. They're certainly nowhere near the PS 85 class when it comes to feel, control & precision. Power, yes, but then again, it's not that difficult to achieve power with a stiff, 100 sq.in stick. If power is what's lacking in your game, then a turbo-charged stick would definitely make sense.

rooski
04-17-2006, 05:08 AM
Welcome to USTA league sandbagging. Do a search on it there have been plenty of threads already about it.
True...however, some of this NTRP massaging is actually being done BY the USTA. In my area we had a 5.5 mens team that WON the nationals last year. This year, in all it's wisdom the USTA people moved ALL those guys down to 5.0. Go figure.

I've given up on the leagues and just play real USTA sanctioned sectional and state age division events. May the best man (or woman) win :)

Galactus
04-17-2006, 05:26 AM
Once you've played with a PS 85, you can practically play with any other stick with a fair amount of success. The PS 85 is so inherently low-powered that other racquets would immediately seem to add some zip to your shots.

Dunno what he means by "much better" when he talks about modern racquets. They're certainly nowhere near the PS 85 class when it comes to feel, control & precision. Power, yes, but then again, it's not that difficult to achieve power with a stiff, 100 sq.in stick. If power is what's lacking in your game, then a turbo-charged stick would definitely make sense.
I can personally vouch for this!

stevewcosta
04-17-2006, 06:15 PM
If I were as good as you @ 5.0, I would never consider anything other than the 6.0 85 unless Wilson decided to made a 6.0 90, 95 etc. Until then, stock up on the 6.0!!!

stevewcosta
04-17-2006, 06:17 PM
When I said 6.0 95, I meant just like the 85 but larger. I hate the current 6.0 95.

armand
04-17-2006, 06:54 PM
I wish the 6.0 85 was better at topspin from the baseline. I can live with the low power, but I wish it would grind better. I string at 56.5lbs BDE Performance(natural gut). It's a bit stiff for gut and I can't wait to see how KLiP Legend will respond. Perhaps I should've even gone to 17g.

Radical Shot
04-17-2006, 07:50 PM
I usually string my Pro Staff 6.0.85 at 56-58 pounds using either ALU, TiMo or Ace. Yesterday I strung it at 50 pounds with 18g TiMo. That's the lowest tension range of the racquet (although with the 10% drop in tension with the Luxilon, you could argue that it could go to about 45) The difference was amazing. More topspin, more control and more power.

I have predominantly base-line playing style, and I use a full western grip on the forehand. I often shank the ball, and sometimes it does feel as if the ball "skids" off the face, like a poster commented. With the lowest tension in the poly, it transformed the racquet yet again. Much better for my style.

I do agree that going to a larger racquet gives you that "This is the easiest racquet in the world and just look at my shots!" experience, however I am hesitant to switch, because the effect might wear off.

Galactus, what is your current opinions on making the switch? Are you still happy?