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View Full Version : Workout plan PLEASE HELP! :)


PHSTennis
06-30-2004, 07:01 AM
I started working out at 24 Hour Fitness this morning... the machines and stuff are all weird... I didnt know what the heck to do at all good thing, this guy was nice enough to help me! That was cool... Well what should I be working out for tennis? What do you guys workout, and if you guys goto 24 Hour Fitness, what machines do you use! ah! Do you do any cardio? Thanks.[/b]

Rickson
06-30-2004, 07:14 AM
I used to be a personal trainer so I could help. I don't know what your goals are so that's important too. Get bigger? Get leaner? Stronger? When you feel out a machine or free weight exercise for the first time, do just 1 set of 15 repetitions. Make sure the weight is light so you can use good form and when you get used to the exercise, increase the sets, increase the weight, and lower the reps. Example-1st time on a leg press, 1 set, 15 reps, light weight. Following week, 2nd time- 2 sets, 12 reps, slightly heavier weight. Following week, 3rd time-3 sets, 10 reps, moderate weight. Stay with 3 sets for a while and increase intensity(weight) when the exercise gets too easy for you and don't ever sacrifice good form for heavier weights, If your form gets sloppy, lower the weight.

netman
06-30-2004, 08:55 AM
Get a copy of Donald Chu's book, "Power Tennis Training" . He has a number of weight routines specifically tailored for tennis. Its in paperback, so its not very expensive. Your local library may also have a copy.

PHSTennis
06-30-2004, 04:28 PM
Thanks Get leaner? Stronger? both upper and lower body thanks Well the guy had me do low weights 3 reps 8 each and said to get used to the forms first... thanks rickson, netman I have school right now im going to be late I ll check that out on Amazon when I get home... more adds would be appreciated thanks!

Mikael
07-01-2004, 10:19 AM
This is something of a simplification but generally, sub 6 reps will promote strength. Between 6 and 12 reps, you're targetting muscle hypertrophy (growth). Above 12 reps, I'm not too sure, muscle endurance I guess, and burning more calories (so if you eat right = getting leaner)... Someone correct me if I'm wrong. Of course this may vary from one person to another.

netman
07-01-2004, 11:33 AM
Mikael,

Its actually the other way around. 6 reps or less to failure (heavy weights) promotes hypertrophy. 12-20 reps with lighter weights targets endurance. 8-12 reps is sort of general strength and conditioning range.

Regardless of the program selected, the key is to select a weight to lift that causes you to reach failure on the last 1-2 reps. Muscle responds to being pushed past its limit by building more muscle fibers. If you aren't exhausting a muscle, you are not increasing strength over the long run.

Mikael
07-01-2004, 12:16 PM
Okay, here's the article I was thinking of when I replied to this thread.

http://www.wannabebig.com/article.php?articleid=31&pageid=3

Basically anything between 5 and 15 reps looks good for hypertrophy. Under 5 you're putting the stress on your neural system more than on your muscle cells. I made this mistake for a couple months this year: I'd get stronger with each session but would see no mass gains... I was doing 4-5 reps most of the time, wrongly assuming that "more weight and less reps" would always lead to more mass gains.

I agree about the importance of reaching failure, if you are careful with keeping your exercise volume low. Beginners very often end up overtraining...

Anyhow, PHStennis, your best bet is to read a lot of articles... The Wannabebig site is really great for that, you'll get all the knowledge you need for whatever it is you want to achieve. They also have wonderful forums full of knowledgeable people.

netman
07-01-2004, 12:25 PM
Great link Mikael. Thanks for posting it.

Agree whole-heartedly. Read, read and read some more. Another good site is www.exrx.net. The key is to know your body, watch how it responds to your workouts and tailor a routine that helps you reach your goals without causing injury.

Good luck.

atatu
07-01-2004, 12:56 PM
The Don Chu book is pretty good, but I also recommend the USTA's Complete Conditioning for Tennis Book which you can pick up pretty cheap on Amazon. Also, Mark Verstegan's "Core Performance" although it is a bit expensive because it came out recently.

Rickson
07-01-2004, 02:06 PM
Mikael,

Muscle responds to being pushed past its limit by building more muscle fibers. If you aren't exhausting a muscle, you are not increasing strength over the long run.
Who told you that? I was an ACE certified personal trainer and powerlifter for 6 years. Reaching muscular failure doesn't make you stronger, it never did. I was able to bench press 345 lbs. at a body weight of 190 lbs. and I never trained to failure to reach that goal. Any experienced powerlifter will tell you, muscular failure doesn't increase strength. I didn't read the link that was posted, but it is true that strength training targets the nervous system more than the muscles. Think about it this way, can a 260 lb. bodybuilder jump as high as Michael Jordan did in his prime? No way! But the bodybuilder's muscles are much bigger. Michael trained his muscles to jump high, not to just get huge. Same thing with strength training, you can push a tremendous amount of weight and not necessarily have huge muscles.

Chuck
07-02-2004, 04:23 AM
Rickson:
So is it correct that, regardless of the number of reps you do in a set, you don't need to have the last one or two approach failure?

Rickson
07-02-2004, 05:46 AM
Rickson:
So is it correct that, regardless of the number of reps you do in a set, you don't need to have the last one or two approach failure?

I didn't say that. I said training to failure doesn't make you stronger. Let's talk about ATP and no that's not a tennis league. Adenosinetriphosphate is what we call the muscle's energy source. When you reach muscular failure, you exhaust your ATP for that particular set. What would give you more ATP? Simple, rest and oxygen, that's why you wait in between sets, but how much ATP would you use up by going to failure every set? Too much to move on to a significantly heavier weight. I stated in my previous post that training the muscles for a specific task, not necessarily growth will make you stronger. You can not exhaust your muscles for this task. Let's say my max bench is 225 for 5 reps. Why would I want to bench 225 for 5 reps if that exhausts me? I might try 225 for say 2 reps and still have sufficient ATP. Then, I'd try 235 for 1 rep, a weight I could not do previously(hypothetically of course). I agree that reaching muscular failure could lead to muscle hypertrophy, but for gaining strength, it just won't work.

netman
07-02-2004, 07:19 AM
Now I'm confused. Muscle fiber provides the mechanical force required to move an object. Granted there are both fast twitch and slow twitch fibers and each of us has a different mix, but doesn't more muscle fiber give you more mechanical force? I'v read over and over that when you activate a muscle its all or nothing, i.e. every fiber is involved. If this is true, then as long as the muscle can perform a task, it won't grow. Why waste body resources building something it doesn't need? So, to add fibers, you have to push the muscle past its point of failure, forcing the body to build more fiber.

ATP cycling seems to be an endurance issue, not a strength issue. In that regard, I can see why this would be critical to tennis, where almost all actions require low to medium force, but lots of endurance and quick recovery cycles.

Rickson
07-02-2004, 07:34 AM
Why did Michael Jordan jump so high? His muscles were trained for a specific task, jumping high. Why does a bodybuilder with significantly more muscle not jump as high as Jordan did? He targeted his muscles for growth and not performance. Muscle growth and performance are 2 very different things. I was not a particularly muscular person when I benched 345 lbs., but I knew how to build up to that weight. I trained my triceps for strength, not so much for growth, and I surpassed my goal of 3 plates on each side(315 lbs.). I've seen many gym members do forced reps every workout and while I see some improvement occasionally in their physiques, I see very little progress in the strength department. Remember, save your ATP and move on to the next weight for strength gains. Use up your ATP and you'll be doing the same weight for months.

Mikael
07-02-2004, 04:06 PM
Netman, I believe when you get stronger without getting bigger, what happens is that you simply optimize your neural system for that particular exercise. It responds faster and more efficiently.

Rickson
07-02-2004, 06:10 PM
Netman, I believe when you get stronger without getting bigger, what happens is that you simply optimize your neural system for that particular exercise. It responds faster and more efficiently.
Thank you, Mikael. I have often been told from novice weightlifters that they gained a lot of strength, but have seen very little change in their physiques. They are working the nervous system more than overloading the muscles. Think about it this way, when you first attempted a forehand, you probably hit a dink with no follow through. As you got better, the forehand became more powerful and the form got a lot better. That's because you trained your muscles for a specific task, hitting a good forehand. Strength training works on the same principle, you lift heavier by getting your nervous system involved more than your muscles. How does a sprinter run faster? By making his muscles bigger? No, by making his muscles move faster. Training for hypertrophy and training for strength are 2 different things.