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MT120
05-16-2006, 07:36 PM
I KNOW DIFFERNT SHOTS CALL FOR DIFFERENT SHOTS, but in GENERAL when a player hits Federer a high ball will he jump up to hit it, or does he do something else like wait for it to drop in his strike zone?



(I had to stress it b/c I don't wanna hear "he does what he wants", or "he can do it all" b/c I know that already)

Tezuka Kunimitsu
05-16-2006, 08:07 PM
If I can recall Federer does not like to wait for the ball to drop back rather to take when after the bounce?

~Joe

Mahboob Khan
05-16-2006, 08:17 PM
If he is in a good hitting position, he takes it on the rise. If the ball is too high, bend at knees, and hit an overhead smash! High balls on the forehand side are not a problem, they are problem for a 1-handed backhand player no matter how accomplished he is.

Rickson
05-16-2006, 09:20 PM
I KNOW DIFFERNT SHOTS CALL FOR DIFFERENT SHOTS, but in GENERAL when a player hits Federer a high ball will he jump up to hit it, or does he do something else like wait for it to drop in his strike zone?

Federer takes many of his groundstrokes on the rise, but if I recall correctly, Federer likes hitting high forehands a lot and he won't let the ball sink as a high ball is comfortable for him on the fh side. On his bh, Federer usually slices high balls. To answer your questions, Federer does jump a bit on the fh side, but I wouldn't call it jumping up to the ball and Federer never waits for a ball to sink into his strike zone.

Bungalo Bill
05-16-2006, 09:21 PM
I KNOW DIFFERNT SHOTS CALL FOR DIFFERENT SHOTS, but in GENERAL when a player hits Federer a high ball will he jump up to hit it, or does he do something else like wait for it to drop in his strike zone?



(I had to stress it b/c I don't wanna hear "he does what he wants", or "he can do it all" b/c I know that already)

In general, on the forehand he usually rises to hit it. On the backhand, it is kind of mixed. Many times he will cut the ball down and slice it back.

Mahboob Khan
05-17-2006, 06:20 PM
The socalled "jumping" is because of his "natural propelling action of pushing against the ground". If you push against the ground, the ground pushes back, and you are propelled up and forward. "For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction".