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View Full Version : Video of me hitting some groundstrokes


bribeiro
05-19-2006, 05:05 PM
Please keep in mind that I've only been playing for a year or so, so dont be so harsh :)

http://youtube.com/watch?v=9XA3enw_-oo

tennisfreak412
05-19-2006, 05:14 PM
Okay, well, keep in mind that I'm just a junior; the advice you get from BB and KK is probably going to be much better. The one thing that really stands out to me is that you aren't distributing your weight as efficiently as you could be. You seem to be leaning back when you're hitting, which is robbing your shots of pace and spin. You might try stepping into your shots more, if you are comfortable with a closed stance, or just load up onto your right leg before your forehands, and explode forward and into the shot. On your backhand, if you just step into the shot more, it will be a bit better. Also, make sure you move your feet more; adjustments steps are really the greatest thing since this cliched phrase. Use them to get in perfect position to the ball, and only plant and start your swing once you feel like you're in the best position.

Like I said, BB will probably have better advice. I'm just a junior :-P.

bribeiro
05-19-2006, 05:16 PM
Wow, thanks man! I'll definitely keep that in mind.

Bungalo Bill
05-19-2006, 05:17 PM
Please keep in mind that I've only been playing for a year or so, so dont be so harsh :)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XA3enw_-oo

A year or so? lol

:rolleyes: Anyway, try controlling the ball against the backboard. Nearly every ball that hit the ball most likely would have been long or out. The backboard is used to develop your technique not to have a slugfest with it.

Use the time you have with the wall to hone your form, your footwork, and your swing path. Try and hit the ball at a certain level. You shouldn't try to kill the ball on nearly every shot.

It is very difficult to really tell if the ball is going to be or not anyway, so just use the wall to practice consistency and grooving your stroke.

bribeiro
05-19-2006, 05:20 PM
I see, thanks for commenting, but like can you be more specific? I know my footwork isnt that great, and I'm just pounding on the ball, but how's my takeback, weight transfer, etc.

Edit: I said a year or so because Ive been playing for almost 13 months.(yes I keep track lol)

Bungalo Bill
05-19-2006, 05:33 PM
I see, thanks for commenting, but like can you be more specific? I know my footwork isnt that great, and I'm just pounding on the ball, but how's my takeback, weight transfer, etc.

Edit: I said a year or so because Ive been playing for almost 13 months.(yes I keep track lol)

Forehand is not bad but I would like to see you practice better against the wall. Your forehand takeback is good, nice a short. Keep working on the footwork and wieght transfer for a better rally with the backboard.

Backhand uses the C pattern. Switch to the U pattern that I talk about a lot here. Search for it if you need to. Not enough onehanders to comment further.

On the slice backhand, well that is a different story. Bring the racquet up and form a long L from the shoulder to the tip of your racquet with the hand acting as the elbow joint. Maintain a firm wrist and go through the ball using the shoulder. Do not lose your wrist position until contact is made. Slow your stroke down more and go out and through the ball, not across the ball.

metsjets
05-19-2006, 05:42 PM
a year??

you bring your eblow up really high on your forehand...but i don't have the same grip so i'm not going to say anything. and i agree what the other guys said. you're leaning back on all of your forehands. your backhands are fine bc of the closed stance, but you need to move foward more on your forehand.

bribeiro
05-19-2006, 06:00 PM
Forehand is not bad but I would like to see you practice better against the wall. Your forehand takeback is good, nice a short. Keep working on the footwork and wieght transfer for a better rally with the backboard.

Backhand uses the C pattern. Switch to the U pattern that I talk about a lot here. Search for it if you need to. Not enough onehanders to comment further.

On the slice backhand, well that is a different story. Bring the racquet up and form a long L from the shoulder to the tip of your racquet with the hand acting as the elbow joint. Maintain a firm wrist and go through the ball using the shoulder. Do not lose your wrist position until contact is made. Slow your stroke down more and go out and through the ball, not across the ball.


Wow, thanks a lot man, that is exactly the kinda answer I wanted, you saved me 60 bucks lol.

bribeiro
05-19-2006, 06:01 PM
a year??

Yeah, why?

armand
05-19-2006, 06:08 PM
If you've been playing for only a year, you don't need advice! You need to get on court and hit like that against real opponents!

Yeah, you mishit here+there, other minor flaws, but you're on the right track and ironing out those flaws will only take time, experience, practice and very importantly: Actual matches(not just hitting around with the local geezer).
And don't forget the serve!

bribeiro
05-19-2006, 06:11 PM
Yeah, I play a lot of matches in local tournaments, my record is like 14-12 or something like that, most players are like 3.5.

Btw, yeah I need to work on my serve, its not very good, I have a video of it here, i'll try to upload it later tonight.

Edit:Thanks for the comments guys

beernutz
05-19-2006, 06:17 PM
Please keep in mind that I've only been playing for a year or so, so dont be so harsh :)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XA3enw_-oo

What's with the bagpipe background music? Do you go to Little Bighorn High?

bribeiro
05-19-2006, 06:20 PM
LOL, I was practicing at a community college and I guess their band was playing.

bribeiro
05-20-2006, 05:55 AM
more comments are welcome ;)

35ft6
05-20-2006, 08:05 AM
Please keep in mind that I've only been playing for a year or so, so dont be so harsh :)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9XA3enw_-oo Looks like you've been playing a lot longer than a year. But that's normal for tennis players to fudge. :mrgreen:


Like somebody already said, you just need to keep playing, that's the number 1 advice. Your strokes are more or less "on the right track."

But still... You lead back with your elbow for a bit longer than I like on your forehand. It doesn't seem to be messing with your timing too much, though.

Your left arm is just hanging straight at your side by the time you make contact with the ball. You need to keep that left arm up and in tight. The left arm is very important on all your shots, don't just make it hang there. It acts as a counterweight on your shots and depending on how you position it, you'll be able to generate more or less torque. Right now it's useless. Look up some pictures of pros hitting their forehands, most of them will have their non-racket arm positioned much like a waiter carrying a tray of drinks with one hand when making contact with the ball.

You need to extend through the slice right now. I only saw a couple of them, and maybe you were doing something funky because the ball was in a weird position, but you don't hit through it at all. On most slice shots, your racket should be going through a "U" shaped trajectory, finishing high and more or less out in front. Your slice ends up way at your side like you just threw a frisbee. This tells me you're not getting enough "drive through" on your slice, and if they land in they're total sitters.

Lastly, your similar in build to me. Losing weight will help you improve greatly. :p

35ft6
05-20-2006, 08:06 AM
double post

Sweden
05-20-2006, 08:43 AM
Did you find the ball that went over ;) ?

Nice technique for 13 month only. Keep working on your footwork, you should find some good drills on this forum by making a search...

bribeiro
05-20-2006, 09:34 AM
Thanks for the comments guys, keep them coming :)

Oh, and I've been working on that 35ft6, Ive already lost 20 pounds, need to lose 20 more.

bribeiro
05-20-2006, 09:37 AM
A year or so? lol

:rolleyes: Anyway, try controlling the ball against the backboard. Nearly every ball that hit the ball most likely would have been long or out. The backboard is used to develop your technique not to have a slugfest with it.



Oh, I forgot to add, I was hitting the ball that hard and that high because if I didn't, it wouldn't come back as hard as I wanted it to.

35ft6
05-20-2006, 09:40 AM
Thanks for the comments guys, keep them coming :)

Oh, and I've been working on that 35ft6, Ive already lost 20 pounds, need to lose 20 more. Right on. I've lost 20, too. Need to lose another 30. I don't look fat according to all the fat Americans around me. Many people get annoyed when I tell them I'm dieting. Whatever. I don't want to be "okay for an American weight," I want to be in good shape. Like what a Polish or Russian would consider fit, not a mid westerner. :mrgreen:

35ft6
05-20-2006, 09:41 AM
And get that left arm working. I think if you start using your left arm better, a lot of the minor things I see wrong with your forehand will be 'forced' to work itself out.

MoneyBall
05-20-2006, 10:09 AM
Wow, thanks a lot man, that is exactly the kinda answer I wanted, you saved me 60 bucks lol.

brubeiro, I was in your same boat. It didn't take me long to hit the ball very well either, if you said you only been playing for 13 or so months, so I guess we are both naturals at it. I would work really hard on all my shots. I would use the wall for hours to build consistency. But lessons are needed because unlike other sports, technique is more important than shear strength. It's much easier and efficient to develop good technique rather than fix a bad one. If you continue to play, and no one is around to teach you proper technique, you'll end up developing bad ones. We all see players that just don't play the game right and it's just plain ugly.

Lessons are not a waste of money..that 60 bucks will go further than you think. You may only need to take a few lessons. I have been playing for 20 months and for the first year and a half I was reluctant to take any lessons and I performed fine. I am undefeated so far in USTA 3.5 singles, 13-0, won two touneys and a couple of t-shirts without droping a set. That was around 5 months ago. However, I want to take my game to the next level.

Short term goal win a 4.5 tourney by the end of the summer and my long term goal is to win an open tourney. Open tourney sounds impossible but I really believe I can do it. So, I started playing guys that are 4.0-4.5 (some in their prime were ex-collegiate players) and won as many as I have lost. That's when I knew I needed some lessons. After 4 lessons, I have developed a slice approach and solid volleys. That's within one month, one lesson per week. I wouldn't have done this on my own and if I did, it would have taken at least 6 months and I consider myself a natural. So lessons are not a waste of money, particularly in tennis.

bribeiro
05-20-2006, 11:58 AM
Yeah, I definitely need to work on my footwork, it's really bad right now.

bribeiro
05-23-2006, 09:58 AM
jco, could you do my strokes? ;p

matchpoint
05-23-2006, 10:36 AM
1. No control at all, the ball goes everywhere.

2. Your balls are landing really high over the net.

3. You are not going on your side enough on your forehand and especially your backhand

3. Your attemp at volley was really bad, you have to be looking at the ball and bending your knees.

Do this.
1. Start by hitting a little softer, go nearer if you have to, until you learn how to control the ball, then slowly start hitting harder when you already have control of the ball.

2. Mark a spot in the wall and make that as your target to improve your consistency. You can't just keep on whacking the ball aimlessly.

3. Try hitting 10, 20, 30 or higher consecutively on your forehands do the same on your backhand, then do it alternately on forehand & backhand. To make this interesting penalize yourself whenever you make a mistake say you are aiming to make 20 consecutive forehands, for every mistake you make before reaching 20 you have to hit additional 5, so if you make 2 mistakes you now have to do additional 10 which makes the total forhands 30.

What is a mistake? 1. if the ball goes below the net, 2. if the ball bounces twice, 3. if the ball died, 4, if the ball is way out of the target, etc. etc.

4. The wall is actually a very good volley practice, a serve practice, a serve and volley pratice. I did this a while back when I was learning. People think that a wall is boring, you can actually make it very interesting by competing with yourself, just be creative. You can do the same thing I suggested in #3 for volley and others.

jackson vile
05-23-2006, 12:10 PM
brubeiro, I was in your same boat. It didn't take me long to hit the ball very well either, if you said you only been playing for 13 or so months, so I guess we are both naturals at it. I would work really hard on all my shots. I would use the wall for hours to build consistency. But lessons are needed because unlike other sports, technique is more important than shear strength. It's much easier and efficient to develop good technique rather than fix a bad one. If you continue to play, and no one is around to teach you proper technique, you'll end up developing bad ones. We all see players that just don't play the game right and it's just plain ugly.

Lessons are not a waste of money..that 60 bucks will go further than you think. You may only need to take a few lessons. I have been playing for 20 months and for the first year and a half I was reluctant to take any lessons and I performed fine. I am undefeated so far in USTA 3.5 singles, 13-0, won two touneys and a couple of t-shirts without droping a set. That was around 5 months ago. However, I want to take my game to the next level.

Short term goal win a 4.5 tourney by the end of the summer and my long term goal is to win an open tourney. Open tourney sounds impossible but I really believe I can do it. So, I started playing guys that are 4.0-4.5 (some in their prime were ex-collegiate players) and won as many as I have lost. That's when I knew I needed some lessons. After 4 lessons, I have developed a slice approach and solid volleys. That's within one month, one lesson per week. I wouldn't have done this on my own and if I did, it would have taken at least 6 months and I consider myself a natural. So lessons are not a waste of money, particularly in tennis.

I agree, tennis is not some mystery sport. If you want it enough you can get it fast.

If you can afored a pro then great otherwise just keep anaylizing, correcting, and applying. Find higher level players to practice with

As for the back board I recomend that you use some tape and paint to put a line on the top part, as stated you hitting too high is no good and is only acceptable with large topspin to keep you in a point.

dannyjjang
05-25-2006, 11:40 AM
the wall at my park is too small...!!!

brazen
05-25-2006, 01:41 PM
LOL, I was practicing at a community college and I guess their band was playing.

CCCC? that wall looks very familiar... but then again a lot of tennis courts look alike.

bribeiro
05-25-2006, 02:12 PM
Lol yes, cccc. MAybe i know you, whtas your name?

brazen
05-25-2006, 10:20 PM
I went to 4C's last year but transfered out this year. I played there a lot last summer with a friend. I'm heading back to the cape next week for the summer looking forward to some tennis, hopfully my friend is still around, haven't talked to him since last summer. Unless you are that friend (which I doubt you are, cause he didn't hit with a prince) but we should hit together anyways, cause that concrete wall is brittle and might fall on you.
-Kory

bribeiro
05-26-2006, 06:36 AM
Oh I see, we should hit sometime when you come back, email me at bribeiro@gmail.com

rasajadad
05-26-2006, 08:20 AM
You hit off your back foot too much which is one of the reasons a lot of your ball go high or over the wall. Your final step should be toward the target. Quit jumping into shots. Bend your knees on low shots rather than drop the racquet head. Here's the key to life on the court right here:
" A common trait of recreational players is that they try to do things with their hands to make up for their lack of quickness and positioning with their feet as they hit the ball.: - Arthur Ashe
"Your feet bring you to the party" - My teacher (less well known than Arthur)