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View Full Version : Short cross court angle forehand - PLEASE HELP


Robbie_1988
05-19-2006, 09:25 PM
Hi folks, after sitting here for 30 minutes searching through the threads I couldn't find any to help me with this topic.

The Problem: I really want to be able to hit those short, acute angled forehands but I have no idea how to do it. When I try to hit these acute angled forehands, I tend to just hit deep to the forehand corner. If only I could hit these acute ones, I'll be able to run my opponents more to open up the court. And also, they look really nice for passing shots.

The instructions I've received are:
*Use an open stance to hit the acute cross court forehand
*Use a semi-western grip or western (I'm using a semi-western)
*Use less power
*Use more topspin (well I understand this point)
*Hit the ball on the outside of the ball? (When I do this, I tend to dump the ball into the net)

I've seen some players like Davenport, Sharapova, Nadal and sometimes Federer do the "Lasoo" like overhead finish. I'm wondering does this help? Because sometimes I see Federer be able to pull off the short cross court angled forehand without using this exaggerated finish.

Please help me,
Robbie.

ralphtifftennis
05-19-2006, 09:37 PM
Hi folks, after sitting here for 30 minutes searching through the threads I couldn't find any to help me with this topic.

The Problem: I really want to be able to hit those short, acute angled forehands but I have no idea how to do it. When I try to hit these acute angled forehands, I tend to just hit deep to the forehand corner. If only I could hit these acute ones, I'll be able to run my opponents more to open up the court. And also, they look really nice for passing shots.

The instructions I've received are:
*Use an open stance to hit the acute cross court forehand
*Use a semi-western grip or western (I'm using a semi-western)
*Use less power
*Use more topspin (well I understand this point)
*Hit the ball on the outside of the ball? (When I do this, I tend to dump the ball into the net)

I've seen some players like Davenport, Sharapova, Nadal and sometimes Federer do the "Lasoo" like overhead finish. I'm wondering does this help? Because sometimes I see Federer be able to pull off the short cross court angled forehand without using this exaggerated finish.

Please help me,
Robbie.

Look, to hit an acute angle you first need some angle to work with. You have to hit with more topspin and have the ball fall within service line. It is a risky shot though and I would not recommend using often. If your opponent gets to it he will then have even more angles to work with. Also your angle shot will not have the pace of typical ground stroke so he may plunder it! Use it wisely as it may not be for all opponents.

You should just try bouncing a ball and then practice hitting the acute angle. This will allow you to get a feel for the amount of topspin needed and at what angle. When the pro's finish over their head it is often due to adding extra spin.

:)

shindemac
05-19-2006, 10:45 PM
I agree. You can't do an angled shot from the middle of the court. You have to be near the alley. The more angled the shot you receive, the more angled a shot you can give back to him. Otherwise, everything else you said is also necessary.

Bungalo Bill
05-20-2006, 01:00 AM
Hi folks, after sitting here for 30 minutes searching through the threads I couldn't find any to help me with this topic.

The Problem: I really want to be able to hit those short, acute angled forehands but I have no idea how to do it. When I try to hit these acute angled forehands, I tend to just hit deep to the forehand corner. If only I could hit these acute ones, I'll be able to run my opponents more to open up the court. And also, they look really nice for passing shots.

The instructions I've received are:
*Use an open stance to hit the acute cross court forehand
*Use a semi-western grip or western (I'm using a semi-western)
*Use less power
*Use more topspin (well I understand this point)
*Hit the ball on the outside of the ball? (When I do this, I tend to dump the ball into the net)

I've seen some players like Davenport, Sharapova, Nadal and sometimes Federer do the "Lasoo" like overhead finish. I'm wondering does this help? Because sometimes I see Federer be able to pull off the short cross court angled forehand without using this exaggerated finish.

Please help me,
Robbie.

You need to learn to hit the reverse forehand. Or as Rickson would say "the ladies forehand". But just to keep it a secret? Rickson can't hit this shot.

Slazenger
05-20-2006, 01:38 AM
In concurrence with Bill here. It's all about the reverse forehand, most especially when you are a good ways in the duece court. (This shot never gets old for me. I hit a running forehand winner smack on the line today with the shot.
You can definitely hit short angles from the centre of the court. You can hit the reverse forehand or you basically windshield wipe the ball xcourt. The ball will bounce in the service box and out of the doubles alley.
You want to complete the windshield wiper motion, in otherwords, finish the semi circle as that will bring the ball down.
It's a good way to hit dipping passing shots.

Robbie_1988
05-20-2006, 02:38 AM
Sorry guys I'm not sure what a "Reverse Forehand" is. Can somebody clarify for me?

nickybol
05-20-2006, 03:00 AM
Read lansdorp.com. Finishing over the same shoulder instead of the other shoulder. It gives you the opportunity to hit on the run better, contact the ball lower, produce more topspin.

35ft6
05-20-2006, 08:47 AM
If I'm going for a sharp angle (defined as cross court shot that lands in the service box) on a low ball (below my knees), I use the reverse forehand (lady's forehand? 90% of Nadal's forehands are reverse forehands).

On a higher ball, above my knees, I CHOKE UP ON MY HANDLE BY ABOUT AN INCH, and hit with an extreme, very whippy windshield wiper motion. Choking up helps you not overhit it, to hit it short/at an extreme angle. But only try to hit this shot off weak replies, not when your opponent hits a firm shot deep into the court.

Like if my opponent hits a floaty slice, or just something without any real pace on it, that sort of sits up, I go for this shot. It's best when you've run him around a bit and he's been pushed back pretty far. Even if he gets to it it's going to tire him out.

One guy I play with never seems to get it even though he's pretty fast. He runs along the baseline instead of cutting off the angle.

35ft6
05-20-2006, 08:53 AM
Choking up on the racket is really useful for whenever you don't want too much length on the ball. If I'm inside the service line and I want to hit an extreme crosscourt or reverse crosscourt shot, I choke up on the racket.

You have to concentrate extra hard on this shot, even though you must whip the racket more, or you're way more likely to shank the ball than if you're holding the racket the usual way.

A good way to get a feel for this shot is to stand inside the service line, drop a ball at your side, and hit a few. The windshield follow through should be "tighter" than usual, as in the half circle that makes up the follow through should be smaller. You really need to carve over the ball.

Bungalo Bill
05-20-2006, 08:56 AM
If I'm going for a sharp angle (defined as cross court shot that lands in the service box) on a low ball (below my knees), I use the reverse forehand (lady's forehand?

lol, Rickson calls it the "girl's or woman's forehand". I think he might even say it is a "female" forehand. Rickson is classic. :)

35ft6
05-20-2006, 09:21 AM
^ Lindsay is deadly on this shot. The women seem to use it more to hit an effective shot when they're late, when the ball comes at them a bit faster than they expected. The men seem to do it on purpose more to generate extreme topspin. It's great for forehands on the run because the follow through doesn't force your body into any particular direction, making it MUCH easier to run, hit a forehand, and stop and run back in the other direction.

grizzly4life
05-20-2006, 09:58 AM
what is woman's forehand? is it when follow-thru goes up, not across the body??

i found sharp cross-court forehands much, much easier to hit after i switched to a heavy, head-light racquet (HPS)... of course, other shots (like basic deep rallying) are trickier with more advanced racquet.

Bungalo Bill
05-20-2006, 10:11 AM
^ Lindsay is deadly on this shot.

She is deadly with that shot and she would have Rickson for lunch on that shot. I don't even think Rickson would get his first step to the ball before hearing "Point Davenport"... lol

Several men on the pro tour use that forehand as you know, Nadal being one of them.

eLterrible
05-20-2006, 10:26 AM
i usually hit a short angle forehand on the run, so most of them come from me whipping the follow-through over my head, or at least ending very high so the motion creates enough topspin to dip it in the service box corner.

35ft6
05-20-2006, 10:44 AM
i usually hit a short angle forehand on the run, so most of them come from me whipping the follow-through over my head, or at least ending very high so the motion creates enough topspin to dip it in the service box corner. Like I posted earlier, it's not just that on the run following through on the same side as your racket arm creates more topspin, it's also that it's pretty much impossible to follow through in a conventional across the body way (finishing on your left side) while maintaining full speed.

If you tried, your whole body would turn to the left and you would fall or twist something.

armand
05-20-2006, 11:00 AM
Robbie_1988: The lasoo like overhead finish you see is called the reverse forehand. With the shot, you're basically brushing up against the ball much more and not hitting through it. It gives you more spin and less power so you can go for those extreme angles.

It doesn't take that long to learn. I'm not young at 27 and it only took me about 5 months to learn(though I'm still learning but I'm confident with it).

papa
05-20-2006, 11:19 AM
Where are we trying to hit this shot from?

metsjets
05-20-2006, 12:23 PM
open stance and hit the outside of the ball if you're late.

bee
05-20-2006, 12:37 PM
And take something off of it. I find I can't hit that should with a lot of pace

deluxe
05-20-2006, 03:33 PM
Try and do what the goat does here (http://clown.ithil.org/~ajss/sampraspoint.avi)

Robbie_1988
05-20-2006, 07:58 PM
Where are we trying to hit this shot from?
Oh hi papa. I'm trying to hit this shot from the forehand corner or when i'm dragged out wide to the forehand.

Robbie_1988
05-20-2006, 07:59 PM
Try and do what the goat does here (http://clown.ithil.org/~ajss/sampraspoint.avi)
Thanks for that clip Deluxe:D

papa
05-21-2006, 05:05 AM
Oh hi papa. I'm trying to hit this shot from the forehand corner or when i'm dragged out wide to the forehand.

OK, so you don't have much of an angle to work with - at least when your deep. Much easier to hit the shot if your given a short or wide angle. Most try to hit these shots using their normal grip and you'll find going to the old hammer grip (contineneal) will help you - I assume you netting quite a few of these shots. Anyway, just change your grip and I think it might help.

Duzza
05-21-2006, 05:20 AM
Hi folks, after sitting here for 30 minutes searching through the threads I couldn't find any to help me with this topic.

The Problem: I really want to be able to hit those short, acute angled forehands but I have no idea how to do it. When I try to hit these acute angled forehands, I tend to just hit deep to the forehand corner. If only I could hit these acute ones, I'll be able to run my opponents more to open up the court. And also, they look really nice for passing shots.

The instructions I've received are:
*Use an open stance to hit the acute cross court forehand
*Use a semi-western grip or western (I'm using a semi-western)
*Use less power
*Use more topspin (well I understand this point)
*Hit the ball on the outside of the ball? (When I do this, I tend to dump the ball into the net)

I've seen some players like Davenport, Sharapova, Nadal and sometimes Federer do the "Lasoo" like overhead finish. I'm wondering does this help? Because sometimes I see Federer be able to pull off the short cross court angled forehand without using this exaggerated finish.

Please help me,
Robbie.
Easy, just hope you'll get it!

Tennismastery
05-21-2006, 03:14 PM
Hi folks, after sitting here for 30 minutes searching through the threads I couldn't find any to help me with this topic.

The Problem: I really want to be able to hit those short, acute angled forehands but I have no idea how to do it. When I try to hit these acute angled forehands, I tend to just hit deep to the forehand corner. If only I could hit these acute ones, I'll be able to run my opponents more to open up the court. And also, they look really nice for passing shots.

The instructions I've received are:
*Use an open stance to hit the acute cross court forehand
*Use a semi-western grip or western (I'm using a semi-western)
*Use less power
*Use more topspin (well I understand this point)
*Hit the ball on the outside of the ball? (When I do this, I tend to dump the ball into the net)

I've seen some players like Davenport, Sharapova, Nadal and sometimes Federer do the "Lasoo" like overhead finish. I'm wondering does this help? Because sometimes I see Federer be able to pull off the short cross court angled forehand without using this exaggerated finish.

Please help me,
Robbie.

If you are on the run, hitting open stance will make hitting the sharp angled crosscourt topspin a bit more difficult. Most pros will take this shot with what we call an 'open to closed' stance; that is, they start with an open stance and close the stance as they make contact.

Hitting open stance can prevent the player from hitting more up around the outside of the ball since their body is over-rotated and they have to lay the racquet head back to prevent from pulling the ball way wide.

Adjusting the grip to a loose eastern grip can help a player hit more around the outside of the ball without breaking the wrist. In fact, the continental grip, believe it or not, can increase the amplitude of this outside spin in what used to be called a 'buggy whip'. Because so few players are familiar with the continental grip in a topspin shot, it is not seen as much as a few years back.

But, even using a full western grip, a player can hit a significant 'dipper' crosscourt by making contact well out in front where the head of the racquet can release ahead of the hitting hand. Try staying sideways longer than normal and see if this allows you to create more angle on your crosscourt.

ta11geese3
05-21-2006, 04:26 PM
Open to close stance? As in they start open, but turn their legs in the opposite direction of their stroke? Or is it something else?

Tennismastery
05-21-2006, 04:55 PM
Open to close stance? As in they start open, but turn their legs in the opposite direction of their stroke? Or is it something else?

Yes, this is very common in stroke where the player is on the run and/or can't set up for the 'load' and 'explode' of a balanced open stance forehand.

ta11geese3
05-21-2006, 09:32 PM
Oh... thanks man you are a very knowledgeble guy =D I was asking because sometimes my body just does it, but I was wondering if it was bad technique or anything (cause I've never seen it mentioned anywhere and I couldn't recall pros doing it...)