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drake
05-22-2006, 01:08 PM
Interesting to note, in the ATP, that 6 of the top 10 players have a 1 handed backhand. Maybe we'll see more juniors in a few years playing 1bh.

lacoster
05-22-2006, 01:17 PM
Interesting to note, in the ATP, that 6 of the top 10 players have a 1 handed backhand. Maybe we'll see more juniors in a few years playing 1bh.

but then 35 out of the top 50 are two-handers.
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Max G.
05-22-2006, 02:11 PM
It's a lot more even than it used to be - wasn't there a time for a while when Fed was the only one in the top 10 with a one-hander?

...I can't seem to find a time like that, though there are a couple where there were just Fed and Philippoussis, or just Fed and Costa.

Either way, a lot more one-handers now, nice to see :)

ShcMad
05-22-2006, 02:19 PM
A couple weeks ago, me and my friend went to visit my former high school to see bits and pieces of some regionals tennis matches they were hosting. Out of about 14 players, none had a 1-handed backhand.

Later, when everything was over, me and my friend hit a couple balls with the players. They were constantly telling my friend to quit using the 1-hander...lol. And, I received a sort of a weird look for using a 1-hbh.

Defcon
05-22-2006, 02:25 PM
but then 35 out of the top 50 are two-handers

This proves beyond all shadow of a doubt that a 2h-bh can get you to the top 50, but to really be the best of the best, to crack the top 10, you're better off with the better stroke, i.e. the one-hander :D

MTChong
05-22-2006, 02:37 PM
This proves beyond all shadow of a doubt that a 2h-bh can get you to the top 50, but to really be the best of the best, to crack the top 10, you're better off with the better stroke, i.e. the one-hander :D

Not necessarily - ten isn't near large enough a number to say that just because 6 of those 10 use a one handed backhand, it is better.

theace21
05-22-2006, 02:56 PM
Kids start playing at such a young age, that they have more success with the 2 hander. It is hard to convince someone to change - you can give them the Sampras story...But their results will suffer for a while, and who wants to lose to someone that you always used to beat.

ta11geese3
05-22-2006, 03:30 PM
Not to mention that the rankings constantly change...

quest01
05-22-2006, 05:42 PM
Most players in the ATP use a two handed backhand. That also goes for the WTA and even recreational players. The two handed backhand is by far the most popular and maybe even the better backhand. The two hander is better for return of serves and high balls. Players with one handers generally have weaker backhands because they compensate by using slice more often and running around there backhand to use there forehand.(exclude Federer and Sampras)

VGP
05-22-2006, 07:20 PM
Most players in the ATP use a two handed backhand. That also goes for the WTA and even recreational players. The two handed backhand is by far the most popular and maybe even the better backhand. The two hander is better for return of serves and high balls. Players with one handers generally have weaker backhands because they compensate by using slice more often and running around there backhand to use there forehand.(exclude Federer and Sampras)


"The better backhand?"

Whatever. If you want limited reach and limited variety.

"Compensate by using slice more?"

You say this like it's a bad thing.

lucky leprechaun
05-22-2006, 07:29 PM
The best one-hander's game can take flight (sampras, federer). The best that can describe the best two-handers is methodical (hewitt, agassi).

Eviscerator
05-22-2006, 08:04 PM
The two best players in the world had a one hander, namely Laver and Sampras. Pete was even a two hander until he was converted so that he could become a Wimbledon Champion. So while there are great players with both types, I'd take a 1 hander over a 2 hander if given a choice for a future slam champion.

randomname
05-22-2006, 08:47 PM
what about borg, conners, and agassi?

35ft6
05-23-2006, 02:44 AM
It's interesting to consider which is the horse and which is the cart, a 1-handed backhand or greatness? Does having a 1-handed backhand increase the likelihood of you becoming an exceptional champion (Sampras' coach thought so), or are players born with above average natural ability the only ones who can hit a 1-hander as a kid?

Then again, Agassi and Rios are about as exceptional as they come. But their style, and Borg's too, aren't as impressive, really, as Sampras, Federer, and Becker's. Connors was a pretty creatively player. Figures he was left handed.

Ripper
05-23-2006, 05:46 AM
This proves beyond all shadow of a doubt that a 2h-bh can get you to the top 50, but to really be the best of the best, to crack the top 10, you're better off with the better stroke, i.e. the one-hander :D

Goooooooooood, lol!

However, THIS IS THE TRUTH: Both techniques have their cons and pros. And, having said that, when you put them both on a balance, I think a good 1hbh is a little bit superior to a good 2hbh. NEVERTHELESS, very few players (pros or, even, non pros) have the patience and skills (and plain willingness to want) to master a GOOD 1hbh. In other words, just because you got a 1hbh doesn't, automatically, mean it's superior to the next guy's 2hbh; in the majority of cases it isn't. A good 2hbh is much easier to master and, therefore, I find it logical that most players will go that route.

TENNIS_99
05-23-2006, 06:18 AM
I think this has to do with how tennis game evolves. The success of Fed brings in inspiration to players to look more into his 1BH game. For top pros I think it is more on the mental side that 1 BH players now have more confidence that they can go pound for pound with 2BH ers with more court coverage. For recreational players, Fed's 1 BH brings in some hopes that they(we) can leap out the level stuck in for long time.
As opposed to some responses, I see more players in the club level using 1 BH now and quite a few are young kids.

Eviscerator
05-23-2006, 07:07 AM
what about borg, conners, and agassi?


If your question was to me referencing my post, I did say "So while there are great players with both types" which obviously would include three of the best you named above.

Eviscerator
05-23-2006, 07:24 AM
I think this has to do with how tennis game evolves. The success of Fed brings in inspiration to players to look more into his 1BH game. For top pros I think it is more on the mental side that 1 BH players now have more confidence that they can go pound for pound with 2BH ers with more court coverage. For recreational players, Fed's 1 BH brings in some hopes that they(we) can leap out the level stuck in for long time.
As opposed to some responses, I see more players in the club level using 1 BH now and quite a few are young kids.

I think much of what you said is right on the money. For those of you old enough to remember, very few men and certainly no top male player used a 2HBH, and it was considered sissy like to do so. Then Jimmy Connors came along and started to pummel everyone, and sure enough you started to see other male players switching to it. Jimbo made it actually cool to have a 2 hander, so the stigma of playing like a girl disappeared. Before you knew it many kids started playing that way, and for those who started that way because they did not have the strength to use one hand, they were never converted as they normally would have been. For a while it seemed as if every top player was using a 2HBH, but that started to change again when Sampras came along. You started to see the reemergence of the 1HBH with players like Stich, Rafter, Korda, Henman, Krajicek, etc. Now with Federer being the top dog, along with the trail Sampras blazed you see parents, teaching pros, and kids going back to it. I would not doubt that if a player came along with a 2 handed forehand (Like Gambill only much better) and dominated the circuit, you would start to see many more people with one in short order.