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View Full Version : First Impressions of the WILSON nCode Six-One Tour 90


Craig Clark
07-02-2004, 09:38 PM
After many restless days of anticipation, my first of two (matched pair) Wilson nCode Six-One Tours arrived via Fed Ex yesterday. Of course, I was immediately off to the courts for extended demos both last night and this afternoon! Here are my initial impressions after a total of approximately five and a half hours of drilling and competitive point play against a very capable 5.5 player. Owing to nasty weather w/ scattered showers and thunderstorms, the tests took place indoors, on medium speed hard courts.

The tester: 42yo male. 6'2", 181#. 5.0-5.5 aggressive all courter.

Frame of Reference: Wilson PS 6.0 95 Tour, Euro version, strung at 63# w/ the same Hybrid (VS Touch 17 guage natural gut/Lux BB ALU 16 Rough) listed below.

Aesthetics, and 'Subjective Feel': The nCode frame has a quality feel and is very nicely made, w/ consistent paint and a great 'pick up' weight. In comparison to the Tour 90 (also on hand for side by side assessment, and strung identically) the first thing one notices, even before a ball is struck, is the difference in weight distribution. The nCode frame feels equally substantial but is easier to swing. My guess would be that the SW will fall in the low 320's, maybe even slightly less. The head size looks VERY similiar to my Euro 6.0 95's. In fact they are nearly identical,even though the two frames are listed at 90si and 95si respectively. Go figure. And oh, yes I do love those Wilson leather grips, and the shape of the underlying handle!

Specifications of tested frame: 12.4 oz strung; 9 points HL w/ the Wilson Pro Overgrip installed. No dampener, thank you. Strung w/ a hybrid: VS Touch natural gut 17 guage on the mains at 60#, Luxilon BB ALU Rough 16 on the crosses at 58#.

Groundstrokes:

FH-I LOVE this frame on the forehand, just like I did the Tour 90 when I first played it, and just like I remember my love affair w/ the old PS 6.0 85. Since I began playing the Euro 6.0 95 Tour last summer my forehand has become my second best shot (after my serve). Take note: the nCode is truly a superior weapon on the forehand groundstroke. Why? Well, with the nCode I was able to generate more racquet head speed AND spin. This spells greater velocity and enhanced control. The result was the ability to rip forehands w/ tremendous 'weight' and 'bite', driving my opponent backward, deeper in the court and opening angles for easy winners. I found myself swinging away, without fear of the ball 'flying' or a loss of control. My opponent commented on more than one occasion about the 'heaviness' of my FH groundstroke when using the nCode SixOne Tour.

BH-For a long time my one handed topspin backhand had been my stronger, more reliable groundstroke. This changed last summer (see above) with my move to the Euro Tour 95. Enter the nCode SixOne and voila the BH is back baby, neck and neck w/ the forehand again! Indeed, all the same comments noted above concerning the FH apply to the backhand. Namely, more racquet head speed and RPM's on the ball translate to the ability to pick a target and let 'er rip! One shot I struggled with when using both the 6.0 85 and the T90 was the down the line topspin drive (to occasionally break open a rally or keep my opponent off guard). I found myself hitting it late with these frames. Not so w/ the nCode SixOne. Put simply, it was easier to get the racquet back early and then strike THROUGH the contact point. In my opinion, one of the hallmarks of all great 'players' frames is the 'plow through' factor. Think hot Ginsu meets Parkay here. And speaking of slice, I've never had the pleasure of playing any frame better for my OHBH slice approach shot. I never had to measure it-just lean in, strike it firmly, and get ready to volley!

Transition/Touch Shots: Slice approaches (see above) were produced as well as I am capable of hitting them. The racquet is heavy enough but still feels very nimble, allowing half volleys and 'pick ups' to flow naturally, and with excellent control. Low approach volleys felt crisp and were easily directed as I pleased. I threw in a few drop or intentionally short approach shots just for fun and was suprised by the amount of back/side-spin I was getting. However if I have a major fuss w/ this frame it is in the ephemeral area of touch-there is a 'muted' quality to the nCode SixOne-not in a 'Volkl-like' way-but definitely noticeable, especially in comparison to my reference Euro Tour 95 and the the PS 6.0 85. I didn't always get the 'feedback' from the frame some other player's sticks provide.

Volleys: The 6.0 85 and T90 were each highly regarded by s/v players, and for good reason. I liked, but did not love, serving and volleying with my Euro 6.0 95. Truth be known (at least MY truth) the Tour 90 could feel a little 'clunky' at net, esp in fast paced exchanges. The nCode SixOne on the other hand seems to preserve the best features of its predeccesors (heft and reasonable maneuverabiity) while adding a certain 'firmness' and stability not found in its forerunners (IMHO) when hitting volleys. It is also CLEARLY more agile. I found myself getting to more difficult volleys and controlling them. Again, Wilson seems to have found a balance between weight/stability and maneurverability that's hard to describe, but certainly in evidence when a guy fires a 90MPH groundie right at your privates. Set the racquet, firm your wrist, and let the frame do the rest! ACCURACY on the volley was another forte of the nCode. This frame can also offer plenty of 'pop' but you have to have good technique and use your feet to transfer body weight into the volley. This became evident toward the end of our nearly three hour hit today, when I began to tire a bit at net. (Read: my tongue was hanging out and I was a bit deyhdrated, but wanted to keep hitting)

Serves/Overheads: Here's the best part-I can really serve with this thing! I know, I know......the PS 6.0 85 is a great frame for serving. I didn't say it wasn't/isn't. Just not that great FOR ME. I can blast the flat first serve w/ the 6.0 85, and get DECENT kick on the second. Same with the T90 and Euro Tour 95. Honestly I've always felt my serve suffered a bit when I changed to the Euro 95 last year-this was one area where I found the PS 6.0 95 Original superior. With the n Code I was absolutely launching the first serve, and hitting the kick and slice serves to the outer limits of my ability. I was able to both pound and place overheads better as well-again I think this was related to the more maneuverable feel of the frame. It just felt a bit easier to get the racquet prepared early. Initially I was (pleasantly) suprised by the serving performance of the nCode SixOne. But maybe I shouldn't have been! After all, more racquet head speed and greater 'bite' on the ball to produce more vigorous spin would certainly only help the serve, yes? And these qualities were in fact the very first things I noticed when hitting groundies in 'drill' format with the nCode.

Conclusion: The nCode SixOne Tour 90 is one heck of a fine player's frame. I can't speak to the role of 'nano-technology' in determining the observed end results, but this stick DOES in fact feel more stable AND more maneuverable in play. I'd say it also possesses a most unique and (to me at least) truly fascinating quality-somehow both power AND control seem enhanced in comparison to it's 'lineage' frames, the 6.0 85 and T90. To get picky, it does NOT offer the last word in 'feel'-Volkl and Head probably still hold those trophies. But for a balance of virtues, and for serving peformance, the nCode will be tough to better. I'll be buying two more (sorry Fabrice).

P.S. In the interest of fairness, given my 'gushing' over this frame, I had a similiarly favorable initial impression of the Tour 90, but found it ultimately NOT my cup of tea over time, primarily owing to it's aforementioned percieved occasional 'clunkiness' at net. I will keep you posted!

Coda
07-02-2004, 11:10 PM
you said the frame size was almost identical to a 95 square inch frame, did you happen to compare the frame size to a tour 90? Was the sweetspot easier or harder to find than the tour 90? What general comparisons can you make with the ncode tour with the tour 90? Thanks...all answers appreciated!

BreakPoint
07-02-2004, 11:39 PM
Thanks for the great write-up, Craig!!

I was wondering if you have any further comparisons between the nSix-One Tour and the PS 6.0 95 Original (my current stick)? I've had a short demo of the nTour but did not find it as powerful on serves as the PS 6.0 85 nor 95. I agree about the "muted" feel of the nTour. I think, for me, it takes away too much feel for flat and spin serves. I also found the weight distribution of the nTour to be similar to that of the Tour 90, i.e, very different from that of either the PS 6.0 85 or 95, both of which have a more headlight feel. I felt both the nTour and the Tour 90 had more weight around the throat area.

If I had to describe the feel of the nTour in one word, it'll probably be "smooth", whereas, for the PS 6.0 85 and 95, the feel is more "crisp".

Jim Hendricks
07-03-2004, 04:10 AM
Thanks Craig, I wasn't going to try the n-code Tour 90, but it is going to be hard not to after reading your post.

Kevin T
07-03-2004, 05:25 AM
Excellent review, Craig. My interest is peaked. By the way, if you have noticed his "for sale" racquets in the classifieds, you know Dr. Clark has tried every players frame known to man, so his opinion is definitely valued.

WilsonPSSurgeX
07-03-2004, 12:39 PM
thanks for the review man, i cant wait to demo one.

finchy
07-03-2004, 01:02 PM
great review craig. how do u think this racquet would affect a player of 3.5-4.0 rating? i really need to step up my game and work on my strokes more, but would you consider this a racquet to help improve on form? how is the sweetspot? is it more forgiving than most racquets?

i currently use a surge 5.1 and i would really like something with less power and less vibrations, but certainly more control. I thought that the six-one 95 sounded perfect for me, but i might need a racquet that would help me improve on my game and would boost my performance and form.

Coda
07-03-2004, 02:31 PM
finchy- I haven't demoed this racket yet, but if you have the muscle to swing a 12.4 oz stick, go for it!

CliffH
07-03-2004, 04:57 PM
Played all day with the demo:
This racquet swings pretty light. Amazing control. Very comfortable.
Really rewards good technique, classic Wilson style. Fun to play with. Better racquet than my classic 6.1 and that is saying a lot :x :!:
The better you play, the better it feels. More pop than expected, at mid tension, so tighter with a soft string is probably necessary. Forehand great. Slice OHBH great. Volleys great.
Couldn't play with the 95 because it is going to be a dissapointment :(
For you ps 85 users: there probably will never be another racquet to touch it for all of it's virtues: This racquet doesn't, but it is a good compromise, as it plays like a 95" :) :)
We played about 6 hours and the racquet felt soft and not cumbersome. The tour90 felt heavy, others harsh.
Will try the 95 and make a decision.

Craig Clark
07-03-2004, 06:02 PM
Hello Fellas,

First and foremost, thanks for the kind words on the review.

I headed back out today for a 90 min hit in the blistering heat and soul sapping humidity. As I sit here rehydrating and typing, I find that the basic impression perists: the nCode SixOne 90 is a hefty, medium stiff, head-light players frame with a somewhat 'muted' feel and more power than you would expect. Most importantly, it possesses the kind of multi-shot versatility all courters dream about at night. While not the last word in 'feel', and maybe a bit over-powered if strung too loosely (what frame isn't?) it will be hard to find something that combines so many virtues in one package.

Now I'll try to address some of the issues raised in your replies:

1. Size of the head: I put the nCode SixOne directly beside the T90 and saw some very minor variations. It does appear the 'PWS' humps are ever so SLIGHTLY (and I do mean slightly-this could simply be an optical illusion) lower in the hoop on the nCode in comparison to the T90. This might explain the perceived differences in 'pick up weight' and weight distribution, as well as what I'm guessing is a substantially lower SW for the nCode. This idea is supported by the observation that others who have demo'd the frame apparently agree w/ my impression concerning a perceived lower SW and enhanced mobility at net. This would of course be consistent w/ a downward migration of the mass in the PWS system. Remember, moving the mass even fractionally closer to the hand (ie toward the butt end of the frame) can change the feel of a racquet dramatically, and would most likely lower the SW while increasing mobility.

2. Sweet spot: I always felt the T90 had 'hot spots', that is to say that the stringbed was not 100% consistent. Since poor string jobs can cause this problem I never really made a big deal of it in previous posts. However, the sweet spot of the nCode SixOne 90 is VERY consistent. I found it to be as large, if not larger, than my Euro 6.0 95 Tours. It also seems to be a bit lower in the stringbed, something I like. In direct comparison to a freshly strung PS 6.0 85 (70# w/ TNT2 18 guage) the nCode has a much bigger sweetspot.

3. Comparison to the Wilson PS 6.0 95: I don't have one on hand to hit side by side, so this will be based on memory alone. Take it for what it's worth! VERY SIMILIAR in character, but the nCode is more 'muted' or damped w/ less vibration to the arm. The 6.0 95 feels more 'crisp', esp on returns and serves, as does the PS 6.0 85. It's not that the nCode SixOne lacks 'pop' or 'power' on these shots-in fact I agree with another poster that it may have a bit too much of both! I didn't notice this at all on thurs or friday's hits, but by this morning I think the strings may have loosened up a bit and I was having some shots sail long. Next time around I'd string the nCode w/ BB Ace 18 at 65-70#. The gut hybrid may be a bit too much in this frame.

4. Using the nCode SixOne 90 at the 3.5-4.0 level: Choice of a frame probably has more to do with your biomechanics (themselves a function of body mass index (a meaure of mass relative to height), length of your arms, muscular strength, flexibilty, and of course ability to time the ball than w/ your level of play per se. I'm 6'2" and 180# w/ very long arms (I'm 6'4" in my arm span/reach-one reason I like to serve and volley so much! :D ). My pal Tim (who I'll hit with tomorrow morning) is about 5'8" and maybe 155#, but very flexible and muscular. He and I are pretty closely matched in terms of ability, but we couldn't possible prefer more dissimiliar frames. Tim can hit the felt off the ball with an old Wilson 4.3 HH that weighs like 8 or 9oz. I can't keep a ball on the court with that frame. So why can Tim play so well with that granny stick (no offense, Tim) and I blast it out of the park?. The answer is two-fold. He uses a semi-western grip to my eastern, and has a MUCH shorter arm span. So, since his 'lever' is not nearly so long as mine, he can generate CONTROLLABLE racquet head speed w/ that 27.5" 9oz frame. I on the other hand can knock the you know what out of a serve with it, but forget the rest! :wink: So, that's a long winded way of saying, 'why not try it'. But remember, NO frame is going to improve your footwork/technique.

Hope this helps! Keep the feedback coming. I'm off work tomorrow AND Monday, w/ lot's tennis to come!!

CC

Coda
07-03-2004, 06:17 PM
Craig, I thought the Tim story was hilarious, thanks for the feedback. I have the same build as you and I can't use anything far from pure player's sticks either...I S&V as well, noone can shoot clean winners past me when I'm at the net.

Kirko
07-03-2004, 09:07 PM
Craig that was great & dead on review ! I hit with breifly & had similar reactions . I thought it was practically vibration free.

Craig Clark
07-04-2004, 10:49 AM
Kirko correctly points out the remarkable absence of vibration with the nCode SixOne Tour 90.......I played for hours consecutively with the frame against hard hitting opposition and felt NO arm, wrist, elbow, or shoulder pain. Some will call this a 'lack of feedback', others will value it as 'excellent damping' or 'vibration control' b/c they are prone to vibration-induced injury......

More to come in the review-I am off to the courts to hit w/ Tim!!!!

CC

AznAntho
07-04-2004, 03:17 PM
can anybody also compare the ncode to prestige classic? thanks

Craig Clark
07-04-2004, 06:30 PM
It's interesting, because it seems so many of us gravitate to the same frames. Gives creedence to my 'biomechanics makes the choice' argument. I know personally that no matter what frame I might try, the ones that 'feel best' are always heavy (12oz+), moderately stiff, head light frames of standard length.

I've been alternating between the Wilson PS 6.0 European Tour 95 and the I Prestige Standard Mid over the last few months. It's been a while since I hit the Prestige Classic, but I have extensively demo'd the frame.

To compare the nCode SixOne 90 and the Prestige Classic: The nCode is MUCH more stable off the ground in 'stock' configuration. I added a substantial amount of weight at 3 and 9 o'clock to my Prestige Classics (just like I do with the I Prestige mid) to reduce twisting on off center hits. The nCode is also more powerful on groundstrokes.

For volleying, I found the nCode easier to maneuver at net, with more 'pop'. The Prestige offered more feel on touch and drop volleys.

I could serve more accurately with the PC, but there's no disputing the superior fire power of the nCode when it comes to sheer pace. I also think the nCode makes generating heavy topson and 'kick' serves easier.

In the return department, there's a clear winner-the nCode. Just more stable. This is also where the unique combination of power and control lets itself be known-with good technique you can just coil and explode into the return and KNOW it's going in, thanks to the remarkable spin the nCode allows you to generate you can 'bend' the ball back down and into the court.

Hope this helps-

CC

ian mercier
07-04-2004, 06:48 PM
Craig,

I (too) appreciate this post. I currently play with the HPS 6.0 Tour 95 and have really come to like it a lot. I switched to it after having been unsuccessful with the Tour 90. I thought the power levels were about the same, but I too found the Tour 90 was much harder to bring around. The HPS 6.0 Tour seems to be a very head-light racquet; I would say it swings easier than the 6.0 original. That said, would you say that the NCode 90 swings about the same as the HPS 6.0? Also, I felt that one of the Tour 90's strong suits was the slice backhand - of which I lost a little when going with the HPS 6.0. Do you have any thoughts on this?

thanks much,
Ian

Craig Clark
07-04-2004, 07:36 PM
Hi Ian,

Good to hear from you again.

I too initially fell hard for the Tour 90, but eventually shyed away (to the Euro HPS 6.0 Tour 95) because of problems w/ maneuverability. I found it difficult to 'get around' on my OHBH, especially when going down the line, and a bit 'clunky' at net.

I agree the HPS 6.0 Tour 95 plays VERY headlight and is similiar in power to the Tour 90. In stock configuration I think the HPS 6.0 is something like 10 pts HL. I use some lead tape at 3 and 9 on mine, upping the overall weight a bit and moving the balance point closer to the head. Mine measures 7-8 points HL. I find it easy to 'get around' off both wings, and it volleys very well w/ a nice crisp feeling and great stability. No 'clunkiness'!! :lol: The slice backhand doesn't 'bite' quite as well with the HPS 6.0, but I think I actually have better control than w/ the T90.

The nCode SixOne 90 is closer in 'feel' to the HPS 6.0 Tour 95 than to the 'Original' Tour 90. I'd say the nCode is equally maneuverable, but with a little better stability than the HPS 6.0. Power is very similiar. The main difference lies in the more 'muted' quality offered by the nCode SixOne in comparison to the HPS 6.0, and in the nCode's unique ability to allow one to generate tremendous racquet head speed w/ tons of spin, thereby enhancing BOTH power, 'bite' and control.

CC

AznAntho
07-04-2004, 09:23 PM
thanks for the reply craig

Craig Clark
07-05-2004, 04:47 PM
Hello again fellow tennis addicts,

Today marks the last day of the 'long weekend' before I return to work tomorrow. Of course I'll be hitting the court at 7am BEFORE work, but that's another story... :lol:

Psychologically steadying myself in preparation to do battle with stifling heat and humidity, I awakened eager to hit the courts, my affection for the nCode having only grown as the days and demos pass. Despite a tough practice set loss to Tim yesterday (5-7 after having lead 4-3 up a break...ouch...told you he was good, despite the feather-weight build and granny stick, he-he!!) I was gaining a growing comfort w/ how best to utilize the new wand.

Perhaps it was fate, or perhaps it was my new-found conficence with the nCode to truly hit out, but it was at most 10 mins into today's practice session that 'pop' went my nCode demo! Yes, one of the gut mains let go as I unloaded on an overhead in the warm up. Recall that I've received only one of the matched pair I purchased last week. Never daunted, I said to myself, 'self, what a great time to break out that freshly strung PS 6.0 85 for comparison.' And so I did!

The PS 6.0 85 in question is new, part of a pact w/ the devil I made (and still intend to honor) w/ our fellow message board poster, Fabrice Leroy. It is strung w/ VS gut at 70#, and otherwise stock.

Hitting w/ the PS 6.0 85 reminded me of why so many people, myself included, absolutely fell in love with it 20+ years ago. There is a buttery smoothness to the frame off the ground and a sense of ABSOLUTE control. Yes, a big, well timed cut is needed to generate pace, but I take one, and so do many of you. As good as it feels on the groundies (and it feels SO pure on well struck balls) it is at net and on serves/overheads that this frame comes to life. I've always felt heavy, smaller headed, thinner beamed frames w/ a HL balance serve better than just about any other racquet. The 6.0 85 is a great example. There is KILLER pop on flat first serves, and VERY good spin on kicks/slices. There's also remarkable precision on overheads, w/ plenty of power. Volleys just seem to happen w/ less effort, that is getting the racquet prepared early seems easier to accomplish, even in comparison to the nCode. There is feedback from the frame galore, w/ lots of 'feel'.

In comparing the two, I'd have to say I'll still take the nCode in most aspects. Off the ground the nCode is more forgiving, and provides WAY more power w/ the same swing effort. The 6.0 85 is just a tad easier to position at net, but doesn't offer as much 'pop' on volleys. Slight mis-hits on both volleys and overheads were better controlled w/ the nCode. When serving, the nCode clearly gives more pace and spin to all varieties of serves. As you might guess, the 6.0 85 is better for 'touch' shots.

I'm having the nCode restrung, this time w/ BB Ace 18 at 70#. More to follow.......

CC

Coda
07-05-2004, 05:00 PM
Thanks for that, I too fell in love with the 6.0 85, but had to switch because I found out I selected the racket for it's feel and control rather than the results I got from playing with it (a little to hard to play with for me). How does the control/touch of the n6-1 Tour compare with the Prostaff original, I know it will be less, but how much so??[/quote]

ian mercier
07-05-2004, 05:17 PM
Craig,

again, thanks for taking the time to post your responses. I wish all the best for you.

Ian

PrestigeClassic
07-05-2004, 05:34 PM
Craig, these reviews of yours are killer. After playing with the Tour 90 for the last 11 months or so, I went back to the Prestige Classic. I couldn't get used to the weight distribution. On the Tour 90 I even put a total of 6g lead tape at the sides to make the weight distribution more even. Of course, the racket was stable enough stock, so all that did was change the balance point and try to rip my shoulder out even faster. But the nCode 90 sounds great, more like a "6.0 90." I love the better stability of Wilson's stiffness and head shapes, where I can better hit back opponents' deep shots that all-too-often come screaming into my body.

Is the string pattern the same as on the Tour 90, where the center mains/crosses are more dense than on the 6.0 85?

Craig Clark
07-05-2004, 06:36 PM
Coda:

The difference in feel between the nCode SixOne and PS 6.0 85 is not subtle. Again, these issues are to some (large?) degree matters of preference.

Experience (and reading these boards) has taught me that what some might call a 'muted' quality or 'lack of feedback' from the nCode, while in turn praising the 6.0 85's 'liveliness' or 'responsivenes' will in others evoke a response to the effect that the nCode is 'wonderfully damped' or possesses 'excellent vibration control' while the 6.0 85 is 'prone to transmit shock'.

To some degree I am personally deciding this issue based on how I play. I play my best when I serve big, look to get in at the first opportunity, and end points w/ two volley combinations or overheads. I am not a 'touch' player.

But of course your health, and arm safety, is a MAJOR consideration for all players. I can say this-while I am not prone to tennis elbow to begin with, after 4 days of HEAVY tennis I've not felt even a TWINGE w/ the nCode.

Prestige Classic:

I love the Head frames. But the fact is they are more narrow across the width of the head in comparison to the Wilsons, and the more narrow the head, the greater the tendency to 'torque' or twist on impact. This reduces control and percieved stability, and logically can't be good for your arm. I too load up w/ lead tape, but find myself then having diminished mobility at the net. If you like the Head PC, i Prestige/LM Prestige lineage, but encounter similiar problems, you owe it to yourself to playtest the nCode SixOne 90.

Best regards,

CC

Craig Clark
07-11-2004, 02:05 PM
I just spent about an hour this morning practicing my serve w/ the new nCode SixOne 90. I had a freshly strung 6.0 85 alongside for comparison, b/c I've made a deal w/ Fabrice Leroy to play the 6.0 85 exclusively for one month and then compare notes. Now that my last tourney for a while is behind me I can honor that commitment! :D

Wilson nCode SixOne 90 (stock): 12.7 oz w/ white Wilson overgrip, 10 pts HL, strung w/ 17 guage VS natural gut at 70#

Wilson PS 6.0 85 (stock): 12.6 oz w/ white Wilson overgrip, 12 points HL, strung w/ VS natural gut at 70#.

I weighed the frames on my own scales, and checked balance on an Alpha "Viper" beam.

I practice the serve by setting out four targets in each service box: 1. down the 'T' 2. 'body serve' target, 3. wide or 'slice' target, 4. a target WAY up the side service line for the 'off-speed breaking slice' serve. Thus there are 8 target total, four in the deuce and four in the ad court. I hit ten to fifteen serves to each target, in 'first serve, second serve' sequence. That is if I make a first serve, I hit another first serve, but to the next target in the array. If I miss, I hit a second serve, also to the NEXT target. Really helps your serve variety in terms of placement, speed, spin, etc.

I used an inexpensive radar device to time my serves. It's fairly accurate, but b/c it has to be placed behind the net, it typically clocks 'em about 7-10 mph slower than a 'true gun'. I've compared it to the very accurate Bushnell sold on the net, which measures speed off the racquet face, just like the ones on the ATP tour are designed to do, and established this to be the case.

I've already commented on the 'muted'quality of the nCode in comparison to the PS original, and offered my opinion that both the nCode AND 6.0 85 are amongst the best serving frames ever made. I continue to feel this way after this mornings practice. Here are the details:

Flat first serves were better struck (by me) with the PS 6.0 85. I use 'better' here to mean in the sense of nearly equal pace but more accurate placement. While I could get just a smidge more pace w/ the nCode (top speed about 109 mph w/ the 6.0, 114 mph w/ the nCode), my accuracy suffered a bit.

Slice serves were more successful w/ the nCode. I didn't 'feel' them on the stringbed the way I can w/ the 6.0 85, but there is no doubt in my mind they were spinning and 'breaking' more after the bounce. I've found this to be generally true w/ 'softer' frames, and the nCode feels softer to me. Don't get me wrong, the 6.0 85 is also a champ here. The differences were small, but noticeable if you are looking for them.

Kick serves, when equally well struck, seemed to have more 'bite' and 'action' with the 6.0 85, but were more difficult to generate. I hit MORE successful kicks with the nCode, but when I REALLY caught one, the 'jump' factor was greater with the PS 6.0 85.

Finally, it is well known that good servers get in a 'rhythm'. It's hard to describe, but it's not cognitive at all....it's about 'feel' or 'timing'. You quit thinking about it and just start throwing the ball up and hitting it. This 'rhythm' was MUCH easier to establish and maintain w/ the 6.0 85. This MIGHT be familiarity. After all, I've had the nCodes in hand all of about 10 days, and have used the 85's off and on for twenty YEARS.

It may boil down to how you use your serve to help you set up and win points. If you rely on the bomb, it will be the 6.0 85. If spins and variety are your bag, baby....well than it's easier to CONSISTENTLY accomplish w/ the nCode.

As always, your thoughts are a welcome thing!!

CC

Coda
07-11-2004, 02:23 PM
thanks craig, I demoed the 95 version and hated it although I could possibly learn to love it in the future. I now have a 90 version in my hands and I was getting scared because people had said it wasn't a good serving racket...my faith is restored for the time being. Overall did you believe the consistancy, the extra power and the extra spin of the nCode is a better asset than the accuracy of the Original for a S&Ver?

Craig Clark
07-11-2004, 06:48 PM
I don't mean to avoid your question or 'ride the fence' w/ this answer, but I'd have to say it's a personal choice based on how you use your serve.

For me personally, given my advancing age and decreased stamina/mobility, I think it may be more important (and better serve my overall game plan) to win some easy points by using the serve to set up the volley, as opposed to going for outright aces or service winners too often. That's why I think I will favor the nCode overall. The slower paced spin serves give me more time to close to the net, and the kicker in particular tends to produce higher replies that can be aggressively volleyed.

For the next one month I'll be hitting exclusively w/the 6.0 85. More to follow as the experience unfolds.

Fabrice, are you ready?

CC

jings
07-11-2004, 07:16 PM
Craig, really useful post, thanks for the input. One question, would you say the n90 is a "forgiving" frame? For reference I have been loving my Tour 90s but increasingly, like you, find them a bit clunky when I need to get into position quickly on 1HBH or volley, but revel elsewhere in their power. Increasingly I'm also finding the sweet spot on the T90 too demanding on serve. Previously I have hit with the 0riginal 6.0 95s and would go back to them but miss the extra oomph I've come to enjoy from the T90s. Off specs, it would seem the n90 is a happy compromise in between T90 and 6.0 95 ... IF it's more forgiving than the T90s - in other words lets you hit off centre a little more and is more manoeuvrable. Any help would be great.

Coda
07-11-2004, 07:16 PM
thanks craig, I tend to go for easy replies rather than outright aces too...but I guess I can get aces with work. Thanks again craig!

Craig Clark
07-11-2004, 08:02 PM
Yes, I'd say the nCode Tour IS a bit more forgiving than the Tour 90, especially off the ground. It is certainly more maneuverable and 'nimble' at the net. On the other hand, the comparison between the serving peformance of the Tour 90 vs. the nCode SixOne 90 is not as fresh in my mind, but I THINK they felt pretty similiarly.

CC

jings
07-11-2004, 11:23 PM
Thanks Craig. Perhaps it might jog your memory but I find with the T90 if I catch the serve a little higher on the strings (towards top of the hoop) it is very dead, plus I tend to have a little trouble getting the same sort of snap into the serve as I can with the 6.0 95. Do you find the hitting area on the n90 big enough to get away with the odd serve and are you able to get the raquet head through and "around" the serve as you'd like?

ian mercier
07-12-2004, 05:26 AM
jings,

I'll throw in my two cents on this one (until you get Craig's opinion)...I too have played with the Tour 90 and felt that it was a good serving racquet. I did notice (as you have) that if the ball didn't find the sweetspot on the serve, you would get a very poor result (typically a serve into the net) - regardless of how fast or hard you swung. I did not have this experience with the NCode (which I've used for about 8 sets). The maneuverability of this racquet makes serving a snap. It swings so light but still has the plow-through component based on its sheer weight. I think you should give the Code a try. It's similar to the Tour in some ways, but plays more solid and consistent (in my opinion). No dead spots to speak of.

Ian

Craig Clark
07-12-2004, 08:19 AM
My recollection is that the Tour 90 and nCode serve similiarly. I do think the nCode is the more stable of the two, and perhaps it is stability that best correlates w/ the perception of 'forgiveness' on off center hits of all types. Keep in mind that my serve is still probably my best shot, whereas my groundstrokes are likely the weakest part of my game. So, I'm more likley to notice 'enhanced forgiveness' on the groundstrokes, rather than the serve, b/c I hit fewer balls off center to begin with when serving! :wink:

jings
07-12-2004, 05:28 PM
Ian & Craig, thanks for the feedback - this has been one of the more constructive posts on the boards for a bit.

Off spec n90 looks great and would appear to be an easier playing T90 based on what you're saying. That's just what I'm looking for .... Ian you must have been watching my matches, that's just what happens on the wrong serves!

Craig Clark
07-12-2004, 07:46 PM
If I were to sum up the nCode SixOne Tour, I would call it a 'user-friendly' players frame with many of the same virtues so valued in both the PS 6.0 85 and the Tour 90. It is far more similiar to these racquets than to the PS 6.0 95, HPS 6.0 95 (Euro), Tour 95, or HPS 6.1. Where it differs most from these two classics is in its more 'forgiving' nature (ie enhanced stability) and 'muted' or 'damped' feel. The latter may not suit everyone's taste-especially if you highly value 'touch' and feedback from a frame. CC

BreakPoint
07-12-2004, 08:35 PM
Craig,

Have you ever tried the Wilson ROK (probably a dumb question)? If so, how would you compare the ROK with the PS 6.0 85 and 95, the nSix-One Tour, Tour 90, and HPS 6.0 95?

Your experienced feedback is appreciated. Thanks.

Craig Clark
07-13-2004, 06:28 AM
I did BRIEFLY try the ROK, but never warmed up to it all. It felt too head heavy and flexy for my tastes. Additionally I found it very unstable off the ground, and lacking 'pop' on the serve. Overall, a way mushy frame, IMHO. Can you tell I didn't care for it?! :roll:

asf
07-13-2004, 07:59 AM
craig,

can i ask you to measure the length of your n90 (and tour 90 if you have on available)?

Craig Clark
07-13-2004, 10:10 AM
Posted: Tue Jul 13, 2004 7:59 am Post subject:

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

craig,

can i ask you to measure the length of your n90 (and tour 90 if you have on available)?


Will do!

BTW, I find the i Prestige mid to be just a smidge longer than the 'standard' 27" Wilson frames but not as wide across the head!

CC

CliffH
07-13-2004, 03:58 PM
Craig, thanks for the help. I sold all 6 of my classic6.1s and I pick up my ncode90s tomorrow. I decided that the added control and comfort of the ncode90 made up for any lack of pace and the confidence I gained to hit out should help my game. I think the pace wil come, maybe with good strings.

During my demo time with the ncode90, I lost some pace on my hard flat serves but I spin most of mine and was supprised to see my opponents having more trouble with them than usual : they feel the same but they have more spin with the ncode90. :)

I wonder how the tighter strings felt on your frame?

Don't get too used to that ps6.0 85: it is addictive! :)

Craig Clark
07-14-2004, 02:32 PM
My nCode SixOne 90 and Tour 90 measure identically with regard to length. CC

asf
07-14-2004, 04:01 PM
which is how long?

i measured another 4 ncode tours at a local store - 2 were 26 7/8", the others 26 15/16"
both my tour 90's are 27 1/8"
i'm wondering why this is

yes, it's been raining for days

ian mercier
07-14-2004, 04:29 PM
asf,

I measured my NCode at it was EXACTLY 27 in.

ian mercier
07-14-2004, 04:49 PM
Here's my take on string tensions with the NCode and also with the Tour 90. When I demo'ed the NCode, I tried two frames - one was strung at 62lbs and the other at 58. When I bought it, I went with the 58lbs. When I played with the Tour 90, I originally strung the frames with Babolat XCel Premium (16g) at 60 lbs. No power...period - on groundstrokes. Serving seemed fine as I believe the Tour 90 to be a pretty good serving stick. I also took the leather grips off and tried some with a little more cushion, which worked pretty well (I think, psychologically, not feeling the vibration made me feel that I wasn't missing the sweetspot as often). Ultimately, though, as much as I loved having these frames, I switched to the HPS 6.0 Tour.

When I switched to the Hyper Pro Staff 6.0 95, I started using Polys and kept the tension pretty high (62-63 lbs). The open string pattern had a lot to do with the string selection (as I hate straightening strings constantly), but I also liked the control (I was switching between Lux BB ALU and Pro Hurricane). This worked well for me up until testing the NCode. I think it was Craig's review that prompted me to try the Code, since he'd played with some of the same frames. The first demo was strung at 62lbs and felt really good. Of course I noticed the maneuverability of the frame right off (as it swung so well), but the softness left an impression. When playing with the 58lbs. tension, the frame felt even better. The slight increase in power helped me just enough.

This racquet is quite an enigma. It's heavy, swings light, has some power, but isn't too powerful. Like Craig said, it plays more like a 95 - and it's true (in my opinion). I've decided to keep the same string type that was found in the demos - Wilson Enduro Pro. It's fairly soft for a poly, and plays pretty well. I might try the Pro Hurricane in it (I don't think I'll be switching back to Lux...just too hard).

I apologize for jumping from subject to subject (after reading my post, I don't quite stay on the same thought for long)...hope this helps in some way.

Ian

CliffH
07-15-2004, 05:31 PM
hey you guys, got my n90s too. Wow.

I put 16g gut bow brand pro mains, 17g gosen crosses @58#. Next time a touch tighter as it seems a little springy.We'll see, It's pretty hot here now.

First thing I noticed is how much better it served than the demo
with stamina @55#. Stiff string, kinda dead, too loose.

Grip was bigger than expected. Both weighed and balanced really close.

Heavy groundies, lots of spin on serves, tons of touch. Cool.

This frame plays much bigger than a 90. Head to head even looks bigger than head93". Glad I didn't do the n95.

Thanks Craig & Ian & everybody.

Craig Clark
07-16-2004, 06:10 AM
I broke strings in both my PS 6.0 85's last night during a match so played the last set w/ the n90s. Mine are now strung w/ VS gut 17 guage at 60#. I was amazed at the spin and control on the serve, and never volleyed better! Craig

Cfidave
07-16-2004, 08:23 AM
Expect my Ncode tour any day now. Going to finally try something other then my (OLDER) Babolat PC's. I have been using a Lux Alu Power/Technifibre Ematrix hybrid in the PC's. Any comments on this type combination in the Ncode? It plays very well in the PC, tempted to continue with this hybrid in the Wilson.

touchytennis
07-16-2004, 08:35 AM
my impression for the ncodes are... they are awesome! first few strokes was kind of clumbsy, but once i got use to it, it felt great. no problems really...

Craig Clark
07-16-2004, 07:53 PM
I've now had three string jobs in my nCode 90 and I've clearly preferred the most recent: Luxilon BB Ace 18 at 70#. CC

CliffH
07-17-2004, 10:14 AM
Thanks, Craig.

Interesting how you take the tension up from 60# for a 16g to 70#
on the 18g. Is this due to stretch, or to tame the power?

Maybe I could play as well with the finer gauge stuff if I increased the tension. I am not a string breaker & I love the fine gauge gut for spin & feel but it can fly, especially with a heavy racquet

Will try bbace18 when my other two racquets arrive.

cliff

mattlikovich
07-17-2004, 04:31 PM
Craig,

Thanks for the awesome reviews. I use the Fischer Pro Extreme FT and I'm looking for something with a bit more power. I love the Pro Extremes open pattern, and from all the talk here it seems like the ncode 90 is more like a 95. What do you think the ncode90 would do, or should I try the ncode 95? I am willing to try both.

Thanks,

Matt

Craig Clark
07-17-2004, 06:15 PM
Hi Matt!

Just so you know: I've not played the Fischer Pro's, other than the VERY old Vacuum Pro Stich frame.

As for the nCode 90, it is clearly the most forgiving 90si frame I've ever played, and provides suprising power.

Haven't hit the nCode 95 so I can't comment, other than to say the HPS 6.1 was a nice frame for serving and volleying, but I had lots of trouble controlling its power off the ground.

Dear Cliff,

I generally prefer my frames strung very tightly w/ a thin string. I think it improves feel and spin. The 17 guage gut popped on me after about 4 sets.....and that get's pricey, which is why I went to the Luxilon BB Ace 18, my favorite 'cheap' string. Another good but cheap string is GAMMA TNT 2 18 guage.

Best regards,

Craig

Craig Clark
08-22-2004, 02:36 PM
Fellow Tennis Addicts,

Having now honored my commitment to play the Wilson Original PS 6.0 85 exclusively for a while and trade observations w/ Fabrice Leroy, and having broken strings in all three of the PS 6.0 85 frames I own, this morning I broke out a nCode SixOne 90 again for the first time in just over a month.

Just last night I had e mailed Fabrice to say I was settling on the PS Original 85 once and for all (at least for the near future 'all')! I'd again fallen for it's pinpoint control, awesome stability and 'plow-through' factor, maneuverability at net, nastiness on the serve, and frankly, 'old school' appeal. Then I had to go and break that last string..........

OK, I admit it, I'm neurotic. Tim has been having loads of fun over the last few weeks teasing and belittling me for playing the PS 6.0 85. Frequently heard: "Pete, it's time to come inside now!"; "the 80's are over Craig!"; and my personal favorite, "call your sponsor............NOW!!!!". :) Nonetheless the tide in our competitive play turned during the same time frame, w/ my taking a consistent lead :) Could it have been the 6.0 85????? Honestly, it may have been, 'cause not much else has changed.

Truth is I could give away all my other player's frames and never look back. But these two are just too good, and in different ways. What I noticed (again) with the nCodes was that ephemeral quality of effortless power AND control fused into one frame, as well as the INCREDIBLE spin I was generating on groundies and slice/kick serves. Tim even commented on the difference he perceived when receiving serve. Namely, that they just seemed 'heavier' and 'more difficult to attack'. He also suggested that if I go with the nCodes I'll be able to justify buying that really cool white Wilson nCode 12 pack bag, the one he secretly wants for himself. ;)

Right now my 6.0 85's are at the stringer, so between today and Wed it's all nCodes.......more to follow........

CC

Craig Clark
08-22-2004, 06:30 PM
Wow! I can't believe the poor review TW handed the nCode 90! I do have a theory-call it a 'String Theory' :) I'll bet it was tested w/ a stiff poly or synthetic. Just like the 6.0 85 before it, the frame is very string (and string tension) sensitive.

I hope this wasn't driven by a desire on the part of TW to prove that they are truly 'critical' in their assessments. For example, do you REALLY think the Estusa PBP Braided is EASIER to use successfully for the average player than the nCode???? Don't get me wrong-I enjoyed hitting the PBP Braided very much...BUT it is a MUCH more demanding frame than the nCode 90.

CC

Craig Clark
09-01-2004, 11:27 AM
I've decided to provide ongoing feedback as I play and further familiarize myself with the nCode SixOne 90, since there seems to be a good deal of interest in the subject and some degree of controversy as well.

After several weeks of playing and tweaking, I remain convinced the nCode 90 is one of the all time great player's frames. As I gain experience with this stick (now strung at 70# w/ Babolat VS 17 g natural gut) what keeps grabbing my attention is a simple truth: this is a 'user-friendly' true players' frame.

So what, you might ask, is 'user-friendly'? Good question! I'd call it the ability to provide both power and control while maintaining excellent stability in the absence of excessive vibration. I'd also refer you to the outstanding serving characteristics of this frame. The truth is that over time I've come to CLEARLY prefer it to the the PS 85 for serving. In short, it's many, if not all, the advantages of a players' frame without the major drawbacks (I don't consider wt/heft a negative).

So play-test my friends. Are the TW guys honest. Sure they are. But there are MANY factors at work in such an experiment. I am sure you will (at the very WORST) have fun and learn something new. That doesn't sound to scary, now does it?

CC

finchy
09-01-2004, 12:15 PM
im demo'ing the racquet right now. i started playing with it on sunday and it felt pretty good and stable. yesterday and today however, i've been sucking pretty bad. im happy i got my surge in today. it was supposed to be on friday. anyways, i cant wait to get back to it because i dislike the feel of the ncode tour now. its way too muted. i cannot get any feel on my shots. i think its strung with NXT. i need a better string for more control. most of the time when i hit out, it either goes into the net or flies long.

its manuverability isnt the best either. in fact, i think its one of the worst manuverability racquets out there. it feels head heavy. keep in mind that this is all IMO. anyways, i was just mad today and started hitting the crap outta balls and now my armpit and elbow are hurting. i have tennis armpit. :? anyways, ill try to stick to the older, classic frames with less bells and whistles. like the PS 6.0 95, if i ever get to demo it.

tennisboy87
09-01-2004, 04:21 PM
Craig,

I know this is kind of off-topic, but I wanted to ask you a couple of questions. Can you tell me more about your experiences with the HPS 6.1? What you liked and didn't like? Also, what tension and string would you recommend? I'm kind of on a budget, so I'll probably just use Wilson Extreme Synthetic Gut 16g or 17g, but I was wondering what you thought? How about stringing at 64 lbs? Thanks for your help. I really appreciate it.

Craig Clark
09-01-2004, 07:23 PM
Dear Tennisboy,

I grew up playing heavy, thin beamed, flexible, low powered frames. I have very long strokes and use an Eastern FH grip, w/ OHBH. I go Continental on all other strokes. Thus, 22 mm frames weighing just a tad over 12oz w/ lots of power are generally speaking not my bag. Nonetheless I really liked the HPS 6.1 for serving and at net. I got tons of pace on the flat serve and alot of 'action' on my spin and kick second serves. It is a dream at net-very nimble and stable, w/ plenty of 'pop'. The problems I encountered were off the ground, where I simply could not control the HPS 6.1's power. And believe me I liked this frame so much on the serve and volley that I REALLY wanted to learn to use it from the backcourt. I tried a number of different string jobs, but liked Luxilon BB Alu-Power 16 'Rough' at 70# best. Good luck! CC

Craig Clark
10-11-2004, 07:40 PM
Greetings Fellow Addicts,

Sorry for the delay in responding. Unfortunately, work has stood between my beloved nCode 6.1 Tour 90's and I of late! :(

Yes, I am still playing the frame. And LOVING it! I haven't modified it in any way except for builing up the grip just a smidge (Tournagrip Original over the stock Wilson leather). I've settled on hybrid stringing w/ Babolat VS 17 g natural gut on the mains and Luxilon BB ALU 16 Rough on the crosses, each at 63#.

I'll stick with my original description: "User friendly player's frame." I find this racquet suits my all court game better than just about any other I've tried. I still love the PS Original 85, and the Wilson 6.0 Tour 95 (Euro) would be a close second, but the nCode 90 is clearly more forgiving than the 85 and MUCH easier to control consistently than the Euro 95. Further, the peculiar ability to GAIN control (by virtue of spin) while swinging HARDER is still there, if a bit tough to conceptualize or describe.

Best regards, and thanks for the kind words,

Craig

ShooterMcMarco
10-11-2004, 10:24 PM
CC, from what i've read so far in this thread, is it safe to say that the ncode 90 requires gut for it to play well? have u tried stringing your ncode with a syn gut? i guess going all lux bb alu is a bad idea.

BLiND
10-12-2004, 01:40 AM
It's strange you say the nCode 90 is more stable than the Head PC... I tired the nCode 90 against my normal stick (i.Prestige) and found it to be nowhere near as stable... also very stiff.

intense2b
10-12-2004, 03:17 AM
Craig

I am going through somewhat of the same situation as you are. I am only a 5.0 serve and volleyer but my serve is my best shot. I hit them just about as fast as you or maybe dare I say a little faster (clocked at 118 with that crappy radar behind the net thingamabob). I have been fiddiling around with the ncode 95, ncode 90, and the ps 85.

I also found the 90 to be the greatest serving racquet of all time. I have never hit first serves like this in my life. however my problem is with second serves. I felt that the racquet's thin beam forced you to really "go fo it". I had to swing really hard,,,which caused errors. My second serve is probably not quite as good as yours and therein lies my problem...but lets face it...most players' second serves are probably not as good as yours. Anyway...what are your feelings regarding this racquet on second serves?

Incidentally I felt the Ncode 95 really shined on second serves. I hit the best second serves of my life with this stick. Although I lost some mileage on my first serve...the accuracy went way up. I was able to hit 8 targets in less than a bucket. In short I felt that the 90 was better for first serves and the 95 was better for second serves....maybe I should swith racquets for each serve...LOL.

Craig Clark
10-12-2004, 06:17 AM
Gents,

I've tried a couple of different strings/tensions, but found the hybrid plays best at 63-70#, depending on conditions. I like Luxilon alone in many frames but not this one. Ultimately an all gut string job was too powerful. I also seem to get better spin w/ the hybrid.

With regard to stability, I wonder if there is a difference in perceived stability owing to the different handle shapes and the way they 'fit' some hands but not others?? On the other hand (no pun intended) with lots of lead tape at 3/9 on the iPrestige and PC I did get excellent stability, but lost some of the great head-light mobility I crave. Different strokes, yes?! ;)

CC

Craig Clark
10-12-2004, 06:23 AM
Hey man, a 5.0 s/v is awesome! :)

I agree that you have to 'go for it' w/ the nCode 90 on second serves. I too lost confidence at first, but found that when I started doing so consistently I was rewarded w/ more bite, spin, and "kick" on the ball. The thin beam really 'cuts through the air', which I love. I get MORE rotation on the ball w/ thinner beams. Now I hit out on both serves, but simply use more spin on the second.

BTW, 118 mph is some serious heat! I think you definitely hit them faster than I. My best clocked times have been in the 110-115 range. But I do hit the second serve pretty well.

Don't you just love this game!!?

CC

intense2b
10-12-2004, 08:49 AM
Craig,

Thanks for the compliment. Unfortunately the problem with my game is everything else! My volleys are not crisp enough and my groundstrokes are mediocre. Thats why I have some problems with the 90. My serving stroke is sound and therefore I absolutely love this stick on first serves. Unfortunately for second serves and volleys and even groundies (which I dont use very much...chip & charge baby!) the 90 is a little too intense for me (no pun intended). The 95 on the other hand may not be as strong on the first serve but it truly is a great racquet in every other department for someone like me. I find that the 90 is an all or nothing racquet. I actually had one game with three double faults and three aces...my opponent was just walking from box to box.

tennisboy87
10-12-2004, 01:04 PM
Hey guys,

Sounds like we have some seriously good serve-volleyers here. This has nothing to do with racquets, but if you don't mind, I have a question for you guys. How long did it take you to get your serve/volley game to that level? I'm a 5.0 baseliner, but my coach says that my hands are pretty good at the net. Unfortunately, while I may have good hands, it doesn't translate into solid results at the net. I'm trying to incorporate more net play into my game, and I was just wondering if you guys had any tips, helps, or comments on what to practice, work on, do, etc. Thanks a lot guys.

Craig Clark
10-12-2004, 02:52 PM
I think it's safe to say that it takes longer to develope a true 'attacking' or s/v game than to be very competent from the baseline. I sometimes think I actually play better tennis now at age 42 than I did as a reasonably accomplished competitive player growing up. The key is to practice as you would play. Think strategically, and rehearse sequences that can win points in matches. Repetitive volleying w/o a purpose is dull and pointless. Try to practice coming in off a short ball (ie include the approach shot in the sequence), making a solid, deep first volley, and then closing out the point w/ a winning angled volley or overhead smash. CC

intense2b
10-12-2004, 07:42 PM
I think it's safe to say that it takes longer to develope a true 'attacking' or s/v game than to be very competent from the baseline. I sometimes think I actually play better tennis now at age 42 than I did as a reasonably accomplished competitive player growing up. The key is to practice as you would play. Think strategically, and rehearse sequences that can win points in matches. Repetitive volleying w/o a purpose is dull and pointless. Try to practice coming in off a short ball (ie include the approach shot in the sequence), making a solid, deep first volley, and then closing out the point w/ a winning angled volley or overhead smash. CC

craig,
I have finally come to my conclusion. Although the 95 is better than the 90 for second serves and ground strokes...it is inferior to the 90 as far as first serves and volleys. The 95 is not nearly as manueverable at the net as the 90 is. Therefore, since I am a serve and volleyer my main weapons are my first serves and volleys. Who cares about ground strokes...I chip and charge most of the time and just try and get to the net. The 90 is clearly the right racquet for me!! I only flirted with the 95....please forgive me...lol.

ferrari_827
10-13-2004, 11:29 AM
I've been curious about the ncode90 but never tried it, perhaps discouraged by the TW review and some comments. But reading the numerous reactions from people here, it might be too good a racket to not at least try.

Craig Clark
10-13-2004, 07:16 PM
Gang,

If you win points at net, you need a frame that excels at net! :) This touches on a major truth, a truth that is bigger than tennis (if that's possible!):

There are no perfect anythings!!!

Frames that feel great at baseline are often unwieldy at net. Frames that provide great maneuverability and 'touch' on volleys may often sacrifice stability, etc, etc, etc.

That's why I like the nCode 90 so much. As an all courter who CAN hit groundies reasonably well, but who PREFERS to get in as often as possible, and who will win most of his matches from the net, not the baseline, the nCode provides me a BALANCE of virtues.

Nonetheless, tolerance is our policy! So, those of you who have flirted with other frames are hereby forgiven!! 8)

CC

Craig Clark
10-13-2004, 07:24 PM
BTW Ferrari-I really think the TW review missed the mark on this frame. Overall, I've almost always agreed w/ Granville's assessments, but on this one we aren't even close. My guess is the string had something to do with it, b/c having strung my frames a number of times now I've seen tremendous variability in performance with different types, tensions, and guages of string. I've settled on a hybrid w/ VS 17 g natural gut mains and Luxilon BB ALU Rough 16 crosses, both at 63#. I urge you or anyone else interested in really seeing what this racquet can do to string your demo frame w/ a high quality string if you do elect to playtest. CC

intense2b
10-13-2004, 08:13 PM
BTW Ferrari-I really think the TW review missed the mark on this frame. Overall, I've almost always agreed w/ Granville's assessments, but on this one we aren't even close. My guess is the string had something to do with it, b/c having strung my frames a number of times now I've seen tremendous variability in performance with different types, tensions, and guages of string. I've settled on a hybrid w/ VS 17 g natural gut mains and Luxilon BB ALU Rough 16 crosses, both at 63#. I urge you or anyone else interested in really seeing what this racquet can do to string your demo frame w/ a high quality string if you do elect to playtest. CC

I partially agree with you. I feel the 90 does not play well with a synthetic string.This racquet more than any other racquet I have ever tried in my life seems to only play well with gut. Its really weird! Roman formerly of Jays also has the same viewpoint as I do (in fact he had it first and the I agreed with him after trying it out). If anyone tries this racquet they better use gut, anything else is just a waste of time. I played with vs gut 17 guage and it simply played like a different racquet than with a synthetic string. Please note that I usually play with luxilon...it is my favorite string...but not on this stick...that is my gut reaction...lol!

William Bedford
10-16-2004, 01:44 PM
Craig Clark - Regarding: 63lbs gut mains and 63 BB Alu crosses, how is the comfort? Are you using a dampener?

Also curios to what other string combinations and hybrids you have tried in your ncode90 before settling on this one.....

Redflea
10-16-2004, 11:20 PM
The nCodes don't require gut to play well - that doesn't fit my experience w/the nCode 90 at all...I played it/w multifilamant and didn't have any problems other than with the weight and stiffness, which didn't fit my game/arm as well as the Yonex RDX 500, so I ended up w/the Yonex. The nCode is probably the best serving racquet I have hit with.

Folks will have varying results w/a given combination of racquet/tension/string...one person's poison is another's nirvana (seen that over and over again here). :-)

Craig Clark
10-18-2004, 06:24 PM
Hummm, string jobs for my nCode 6.1 90's......well:

Babolat VS Touch Gut 17 g mains/Luxilon BB 16 crosses at 63#
(this is my current rig and I LOVE it).....plays very well, no problems w/ comfort. Probably a little stiffer than some will prefer, but is perfect for my tastes.

VS Touch Gut 17g @70#: second favorite set up! The most comfortable of them all, but too much power off the ground. GREAT for serving. Lots of 'kick' on second serves.

Luxilon BB Ace 18 g @65#: great power, but a bit stiff, even by my standards. Outstanding spin. HEAT on first serves. Diminished 'touch' on volleys.

GAMMA TNT 18 g @60#: WAY too powerful, but very comfy. Lots of spin and kick on serves-I could 'break off' serves out wide in the deuce court at will. Caused some opponents to run into the netting. PROBLEM: break strings every set or two.

CAC

Craig Clark
10-18-2004, 06:28 PM
Oh, forgot to mention-no dampener. I gave them up about a year ago. I think I benefit from 'hearing' the ball more at impact, especially outdoors.

Anonymous
10-19-2004, 03:19 AM
Craig, I'm a 15yr old Jr. player, and I recently switched to the n90; it sounds like I have the same strokes as you except I don't serve and volley. I switched to a 1H backhand about a month and a half ago (which I love), use an Eastern, Flat forehand n have a big serve. I love this racket, but I've had great success stringing it at 58lbs w/ Wilson Sensation Synthetic, a relatively cheap string. It's kinda funny because I usually am really sensetive to strings, and usually play with either natural or a high quality Poly in the 15$ range, but this seemed to play amazingly well with Sensation. What'd you string it at and with what string? This racket is great for the Eastern forehand, eh?

Craig Clark
10-19-2004, 05:41 AM
Good morning-

See my last post for various string/tension combos.

I like Wilson Sensation, but I think it loses tension VERY quickly. This creates 'hidden costs' b/c you need to restring more often, say in comparison to an all natural gut job.

And yes, I've never hit my forehand better. :)

CC

Craig Clark
08-04-2005, 06:35 PM
OK, believe it or not, more than one year has passed and I've been faithful (more or less) to the nCode 90 the entire time.

What caused me to change my racquet philandering ways? In a word, balance. The nCode 90 provides a balance of virtues unmatched in my experience. Great cosmetics (yes they matter), a fine pick up weight and heft, excellent touch/feel, plenty of power, access to spin, and of course fine maneuverability. Most of all, I generally play well with this frame, and do so in all areas, ie groundies, volleys, serves, overheads, transition/specialty shots, etc.

So goodbye Babolat, Head, Prince, Volkl, Dunlop, Estusa, PK, and all the others. At least for now.................. ;)

CC

William Bedford
08-11-2005, 07:14 AM
Craig,

I bought an RDX mid after reading all the hype about it on these boards - only to go back to the ncode90. Just love the plough through factor an pace off the forehand and backhand.

You should try some of the new uncoated Klip Legend Gut in your ncode when you next restring. After using Babolat Touch\Tonic in 16G for almost 2 years, I have now switched to the Klip uncoated. I have found durability to be the same. Feel and control are greatly increased. I will be trying the 17G uncoated as soon as our indoor season starts again.

Happy hitting!

hyperwarrior
08-16-2005, 08:18 AM
After many restless days of anticipation, my first of two (matched pair) Wilson nCode Six-One Tours arrived via Fed Ex yesterday. Of course, I was immediately off to the courts for extended demos both last night and this afternoon! Here are my initial impressions after a total of approximately five and a half hours of drilling and competitive point play against a very capable 5.5 player. Owing to nasty weather w/ scattered showers and thunderstorms, the tests took place indoors, on medium speed hard courts.

The tester: 42yo male. 6'2", 181#. 5.0-5.5 aggressive all courter.

Frame of Reference: Wilson PS 6.0 95 Tour, Euro version, strung at 63# w/ the same Hybrid (VS Touch 17 guage natural gut/Lux BB ALU 16 Rough) listed below.

Aesthetics, and 'Subjective Feel': The nCode frame has a quality feel and is very nicely made, w/ consistent paint and a great 'pick up' weight. In comparison to the Tour 90 (also on hand for side by side assessment, and strung identically) the first thing one notices, even before a ball is struck, is the difference in weight distribution. The nCode frame feels equally substantial but is easier to swing. My guess would be that the SW will fall in the low 320's, maybe even slightly less. The head size looks VERY similiar to my Euro 6.0 95's. In fact they are nearly identical,even though the two frames are listed at 90si and 95si respectively. Go figure. And oh, yes I do love those Wilson leather grips, and the shape of the underlying handle!

Specifications of tested frame: 12.4 oz strung; 9 points HL w/ the Wilson Pro Overgrip installed. No dampener, thank you. Strung w/ a hybrid: VS Touch natural gut 17 guage on the mains at 60#, Luxilon BB ALU Rough 16 on the crosses at 58#.

Groundstrokes:

FH-I LOVE this frame on the forehand, just like I did the Tour 90 when I first played it, and just like I remember my love affair w/ the old PS 6.0 85. Since I began playing the Euro 6.0 95 Tour last summer my forehand has become my second best shot (after my serve). Take note: the nCode is truly a superior weapon on the forehand groundstroke. Why? Well, with the nCode I was able to generate more racquet head speed AND spin. This spells greater velocity and enhanced control. The result was the ability to rip forehands w/ tremendous 'weight' and 'bite', driving my opponent backward, deeper in the court and opening angles for easy winners. I found myself swinging away, without fear of the ball 'flying' or a loss of control. My opponent commented on more than one occasion about the 'heaviness' of my FH groundstroke when using the nCode SixOne Tour.

BH-For a long time my one handed topspin backhand had been my stronger, more reliable groundstroke. This changed last summer (see above) with my move to the Euro Tour 95. Enter the nCode SixOne and voila the BH is back baby, neck and neck w/ the forehand again! Indeed, all the same comments noted above concerning the FH apply to the backhand. Namely, more racquet head speed and RPM's on the ball translate to the ability to pick a target and let 'er rip! One shot I struggled with when using both the 6.0 85 and the T90 was the down the line topspin drive (to occasionally break open a rally or keep my opponent off guard). I found myself hitting it late with these frames. Not so w/ the nCode SixOne. Put simply, it was easier to get the racquet back early and then strike THROUGH the contact point. In my opinion, one of the hallmarks of all great 'players' frames is the 'plow through' factor. Think hot Ginsu meets Parkay here. And speaking of slice, I've never had the pleasure of playing any frame better for my OHBH slice approach shot. I never had to measure it-just lean in, strike it firmly, and get ready to volley!

Transition/Touch Shots: Slice approaches (see above) were produced as well as I am capable of hitting them. The racquet is heavy enough but still feels very nimble, allowing half volleys and 'pick ups' to flow naturally, and with excellent control. Low approach volleys felt crisp and were easily directed as I pleased. I threw in a few drop or intentionally short approach shots just for fun and was suprised by the amount of back/side-spin I was getting. However if I have a major fuss w/ this frame it is in the ephemeral area of touch-there is a 'muted' quality to the nCode SixOne-not in a 'Volkl-like' way-but definitely noticeable, especially in comparison to my reference Euro Tour 95 and the the PS 6.0 85. I didn't always get the 'feedback' from the frame some other player's sticks provide.

Volleys: The 6.0 85 and T90 were each highly regarded by s/v players, and for good reason. I liked, but did not love, serving and volleying with my Euro 6.0 95. Truth be known (at least MY truth) the Tour 90 could feel a little 'clunky' at net, esp in fast paced exchanges. The nCode SixOne on the other hand seems to preserve the best features of its predeccesors (heft and reasonable maneuverabiity) while adding a certain 'firmness' and stability not found in its forerunners (IMHO) when hitting volleys. It is also CLEARLY more agile. I found myself getting to more difficult volleys and controlling them. Again, Wilson seems to have found a balance between weight/stability and maneurverability that's hard to describe, but certainly in evidence when a guy fires a 90MPH groundie right at your privates. Set the racquet, firm your wrist, and let the frame do the rest! ACCURACY on the volley was another forte of the nCode. This frame can also offer plenty of 'pop' but you have to have good technique and use your feet to transfer body weight into the volley. This became evident toward the end of our nearly three hour hit today, when I began to tire a bit at net. (Read: my tongue was hanging out and I was a bit deyhdrated, but wanted to keep hitting)

Serves/Overheads: Here's the best part-I can really serve with this thing! I know, I know......the PS 6.0 85 is a great frame for serving. I didn't say it wasn't/isn't. Just not that great FOR ME. I can blast the flat first serve w/ the 6.0 85, and get DECENT kick on the second. Same with the T90 and Euro Tour 95. Honestly I've always felt my serve suffered a bit when I changed to the Euro 95 last year-this was one area where I found the PS 6.0 95 Original superior. With the n Code I was absolutely launching the first serve, and hitting the kick and slice serves to the outer limits of my ability. I was able to both pound and place overheads better as well-again I think this was related to the more maneuverable feel of the frame. It just felt a bit easier to get the racquet prepared early. Initially I was (pleasantly) suprised by the serving performance of the nCode SixOne. But maybe I shouldn't have been! After all, more racquet head speed and greater 'bite' on the ball to produce more vigorous spin would certainly only help the serve, yes? And these qualities were in fact the very first things I noticed when hitting groundies in 'drill' format with the nCode.

Conclusion: The nCode SixOne Tour 90 is one heck of a fine player's frame. I can't speak to the role of 'nano-technology' in determining the observed end results, but this stick DOES in fact feel more stable AND more maneuverable in play. I'd say it also possesses a most unique and (to me at least) truly fascinating quality-somehow both power AND control seem enhanced in comparison to it's 'lineage' frames, the 6.0 85 and T90. To get picky, it does NOT offer the last word in 'feel'-Volkl and Head probably still hold those trophies. But for a balance of virtues, and for serving peformance, the nCode will be tough to better. I'll be buying two more (sorry Fabrice).

P.S. In the interest of fairness, given my 'gushing' over this frame, I had a similiarly favorable initial impression of the Tour 90, but found it ultimately NOT my cup of tea over time, primarily owing to it's aforementioned percieved occasional 'clunkiness' at net. I will keep you posted!

Did you find the racquet too demanding when you try it the first time?
The 1st time I play with it, I got tired easily after hitting 4-5 balls. I was questioning if I made a mistake buying the nCode 90. I switched from a Wilson Hyper Hammer 4.0 , 8.8oz, to the nCode 90.
I decide to keep it and after I play more and more, I got used to the weight and I can play around 2 hours with ease. The racquet is stable and I agree the feel is muted. Overall, I love it and and it's surprising I don't mis-hit a lot like the playtesters of TW says.

ART ART
08-16-2005, 09:42 AM
Very impressive racket, even at first time. Very stable, one of the most stable rackets ever made. It looks like the old school rackets, can't compare to the new generations of rackets, this is good stuff.

FireSon
08-16-2005, 02:28 PM
OK, believe it or not, more than one year has passed and I've been faithful (more or less) to the nCode 90 the entire time.
CC

Well same here more or less. I have tried several other racquets (playtests) but have always come back to the n90 mainly because of the groundstrokes, it feels like "coming home" when returning to this racquet. Nothing beats the feeling of ripping a backhand return crosscourt with this racquet! And you are absolutely right that the good thing (for me as well) is the balance.

The only reason for looking for something else was my volley, but I invested a great deal of time in it and the results are rewarding!


Dropped the tention to 55 lbs (25kg) over the year, which provides me the best combination of power and control.

Nice to hear the feedback of other users as well after a year of play!

hyperwarrior
08-20-2005, 04:30 PM
Well same here more or less. I have tried several other racquets (playtests) but have always come back to the n90 mainly because of the groundstrokes, it feels like "coming home" when returning to this racquet. Nothing beats the feeling of ripping a backhand return crosscourt with this racquet! And you are absolutely right that the good thing (for me as well) is the balance.

The only reason for looking for something else was my volley, but I invested a great deal of time in it and the results are rewarding!


Dropped the tention to 55 lbs (25kg) over the year, which provides me the best combination of power and control.

Nice to hear the feedback of other users as well after a year of play!

Was it hard to use the first time you played with it? I mean was it demanding?

Flatspin
08-20-2005, 06:02 PM
I agree with Blind. I demoed a n code tour 90 with a buddy of mine. I found it to be a decent frame but found it not nearly as stable as my regular stick ... the i Prestige mid. I thought the ncode 90, however, was generally a very capable frame and could be a good platform to base one's game. Good review Graig!!

textbook strokes
08-25-2005, 06:51 AM
I bought the ncode six-one tour after reading the passionate review that started this thread. I think I'm only a 4.0 intermediate player, but I have the better looking strokes in my club ;) , I'm just a little lazy with my footwork.
The thing is, everybody here thinks I'm crazy for using this heavy stick with this small head.
All I can say is that this racquet makes me happy, and when you feel happy with your stick, you'll do whatever you have to do to compensate any disadvantage you might experience. Hell, I even run on court!!
After playing with all the models available in my country, I have found power, control, plow through factor, spin, touch and joy with this baby.
Thanks a lot Craig!.

BounceHitBounceHit
11-25-2005, 07:25 PM
Fellow Tennis Addicts,

I summarized my first couple of weeks of experience with the nCode 90 just as they happened............so no, it wasn't a big adjustment. But remember I was using a 12.4 oz, 10 pt HL frame w/ a 65 flex in the Euro HPS 6.0 Tour 95 before moving to the nCode 90. That's nothing like the change you are describing in coming from a 8.8oz HH 4.0.


I will try the uncoated Klip gut. Sounds great!!

Best,

Craig

BreakPoint
11-25-2005, 09:29 PM
But Craig, aren't you back to using the PS Tour 90 now instead of the nCode 90? As you've mentioned in another thread tonight, you've sold off most of your nCode 90's and are using the Tour 90 now, right? So I guess the honeymoon with the nCode 90 really is over then? If so, why?

LordRaceR
11-26-2005, 06:38 AM
Hmm, it is interesting to see that a lot of people like nCode90. Man, obviously Federer and marketing are everything.

legolas
11-26-2005, 07:46 AM
the first time i held it in my hand, i bought it immediately, it pretty much works for me perfectly

BounceHitBounceHit
11-26-2005, 06:51 PM
Hello Breakpoint and Other Tennis Nuts,

Yes, I am in fact back to the Tour 90. I think it was the 'muted' quality to the nCode 90 that finally broke the magic for me. There is definitely less feel (and more power) when hitting with the nCode 90 when compared to either of my other faves, the Tour 90, Euro HPS 6.0 95, or i Prestie mid. This is true even when strung w/ gut at high tension (I like 'em around 70#).

Best,

Craig

pham4313
11-28-2005, 10:52 AM
Craig,
On racquetsports industry magazine, (http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com March issue and racket selection map of 04 and 05) they said the Tour 90 is a tad more powerful than the ncode with rating level of 1960 vs 1930 or something. And it seems to me the ncode 90 is flexier with a stiffness of 66 compared to 68 in the Tour 90. Everything on the ncode 90 looks like the PS original 85 except larger headsize. Thus, powerwise, the ncode 90 should be less powerful than the Tour 90 at least on groundies. Whats your take?

legolas
11-28-2005, 02:48 PM
i love my ncode 90 tour

omigod
11-28-2005, 06:44 PM
One thing I have noticed about Ncode 90 Tour that the framed shots tend to go in play. I guess the PS6.0 85 and Ncode 90 both have flat & wide frames which make good contact with the ball!

Marius_Hancu
11-28-2005, 06:50 PM
One thing I have noticed about T90, the frame shots tend to go in play.

I would not be so sure about that. Even Fed loses many of these. OK, he has a PJ, but still close.

IMO, ProStaff Tour 90 isn't that nice as 6.0 85 when not hit in the sweetspot, both from the baseline and at the net. Not sure about n-code Tour 90.

But it generates easier top and has more power.

omigod
11-28-2005, 06:54 PM
Hello Breakpoint and Other Tennis Nuts,

Yes, I am in fact back to the Tour 90. I think it was the 'muted' quality to the nCode 90 that finally broke the magic for me. There is definitely less feel (and more power) when hitting with the nCode 90 when compared to either of my other faves, the Tour 90, Euro HPS 6.0 95, or i Prestie mid. This is true even when strung w/ gut at high tension (I like 'em around 70#).

Best,

Craig

Did you need to reinforce the frame to string at 70#? I string mine at 65# with VS Team 17 and the string usually breaks after 6 hours of play.

I don't mind it so much since I play tennis about 1 hour a week :|

JPlay_1723
11-28-2005, 08:12 PM
do any of you guys use the ncode90 with a 2 hand backhand?....That was the stroke that gave me problems with this racquet.

BounceHitBounceHit
11-29-2005, 09:46 AM
Craig,
On racquetsports industry magazine, (http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com March issue and racket selection map of 04 and 05) they said the Tour 90 is a tad more powerful than the ncode with rating level of 1960 vs 1930 or something. And it seems to me the ncode 90 is flexier with a stiffness of 66 compared to 68 in the Tour 90. Everything on the ncode 90 looks like the PS original 85 except larger headsize. Thus, powerwise, the ncode 90 should be less powerful than the Tour 90 at least on groundies. Whats your take?

I can't say that's been my experience. The nCode 90 seems substantially more powerful to me from all areas of the court. It's interesting how sometimes the 'subjective experience' or 'feel' of the frame can so differ from the published specs.

Speaking of which, there has been some substantial differneces in published and measured specs on the nCode 90. My original matched pair weighed 12.4oz strung. A second pair tipped the scale at a whopping 12.8 strung!!!

CC

BreakPoint
11-29-2005, 11:45 AM
Speaking of which, there has been some substantial differneces in published and measured specs on the nCode 90. My original matched pair weighed 12.4oz strung. A second pair tipped the scale at a whopping 12.8 strung!!!


That's Wilson's great quality control for ya! :rolleyes: Not unusual at all for Wilson racquets. :(

BounceHitBounceHit
11-29-2005, 01:14 PM
It's truly one of the most frustrating things in this hobby, because there can be enormous variation in playability between frames with such widely disparate specs.

I wonder what company(ies) tend to make the most consistent frames? I know my Euro HPS 6.0 95's are all EXACTLY the same in terms of static weight and balance points. So maybe Wilson CAN do it........they just don't ALWAYS do it! :cool:

CC

NoBadMojo
11-29-2005, 01:30 PM
Fischer and Volkl make the tightest tolerance frames and nobody else seems to come close i dont think. Industry standard tolerance is .03, Volkl is .015 and Fischer I still believe labels all their frames w. weight, and i think balance and they all feel as they should swingweight wise. Also all companies can change specs from time to time. It's always a good idea to buy multiple frames at the same time and get them to send you closest matches, otherwise you can get frames with wildly varying specs.

BounceHitBounceHit
11-29-2005, 05:03 PM
Gents,

A couple of quick comments:

Ed-I agree that the Volkl frames are incredibly consistent. I love the T10 VE MP but don't serve very well with it for some reason. I think your pal down the street at the Ritz will tell you I have a pretty good serve when it's cookin' ;)

Omigod- I did not reinforce the frame to string at 70#. Never had a problem with that tension, which I've used in a number of mid plus

And Ed-how about that Klip gut? Should I try it out?

Best,

Craig

omigod
11-29-2005, 06:36 PM
That's Wilson's great quality control for ya! :rolleyes: Not unusual at all for Wilson racquets. :(

My 2 nCode 90s are 355g and 365g (strung). 10g difference between the 2.
The specified unstrung weight is 340g. I can accept 350g-355g strung but 365g is too heavy to haul around.

My old Head iPrestige racquets are within 3 g of each other.

As a result of poor Wilson quality, I had to get my ncodes "customized" to the same weight and balance.

NoBadMojo
11-29-2005, 07:19 PM
Craig I would recommend the Klip Legend gut highly. it's crisp but yet still plays really deep in the pocket. If you arent a string breaker and are worried about too much power, try the 18ga coated. It pockets like nothing i've ever played and plays with less power than the 17 gauge. it's not meant to be strung tightly however..perhaps 60 pounds max....seems like the power is converted into pocketing and spin...too much for me as i get as much spin as i want with the 17ga and benefit from the power on the har tru. The Klip uncoated is pretty special but doesnt work so well down here on the dirt. regards, Ed

BreakPoint
11-29-2005, 08:57 PM
I also had a nCode 90 that was 0.5 oz. heavier than spec.

bluegrasser
11-30-2005, 04:16 AM
I liked the 90' better than the 95" off the ground, but found the 90" wanting on the serve and the volley, if you hit the ball just above the middle of the strings it's deadsville.

BounceHitBounceHit
12-01-2005, 04:42 AM
I am always fascinated by the widely disparate impressions folks have concerning the playability of tennis frames. For example, BlueGrass and I are absolutely opposite in our experience of the nCode 90/95. I play MUCH better at net w/ the 90 and am far more consistent off the ground w/the 95, though in fairness I like them both in each application very much. More and more I think my 'body morphology/biomechanics' theorem has some true validity.

For example, I read in this forum a post suggesting that a change to a Vantage frame took a particular player from the 4.0 to 4.5 level. Now folks that's NOT a small step up IMO. What I'd suggest instead is that THE RIGHT FRAME (and it could have been any frame) with the 'biomechanically correct' specs with regard to static wt, swing wt, length, balance point, flex, string pattern, etc WILL INDEED improve your game. But this is NOT peculiar to any brand/type/shape. It is idiosyncratically determined by YOU and your body type/shape/weight, etc. To support this idea: I am blessed to be able to play tennis with a former touring pro, and she agrees that the right frame makes a very big difference indeed, having worked in the arena of racquet customization for some period of time herself.

So......search for the best fit in frames, customize to your heart's delight, but also listen to NoBadMojo! Too much fiddling will deter your progress, not enhance it!! I speak from experience.

Comically, I've probably hit every player's frame out there in the last couple of years, but have found my way back to essentially where I started. Namely, I used the Wilson PS 6.0 85 for 20+ years, and now play the Tour 90!!! What a journey!!!!

Obsessively yours,

CC

Flatspin
12-03-2005, 02:45 AM
I love this racquet. Certainly, imo, you need to be a capable player. What best describes my impression is a PS 6.0 (85) with 10% bigger sweet-spot, 10% more power, 10% firmer and just as difficult to play. However, if you got the game ..... an excellent performance frame. A great platform for a 4.0+ player who is serious about taking his/her player to the next level. For me, it was a blast to play with the Tour 90. Brings back fond memories....... I picked this racquet up and played well the first time!
I enjoyed how this frame demands early racquet preparation and focus on the ball. When I hit the ball well .... this frame really rewards! I truly understand why some players love this racquet!

MTXR
12-03-2005, 05:33 PM
Alright, i have demoed it, and i think i might just make the switch from my PS 6.0 85 i been trying to hold off, but the availability of the 6.0 is just so annoying.

I am down to 1 ps 6.0 85.

BounceHitBounceHit
12-03-2005, 06:12 PM
Alright, i have demoed it, and i think i might just make the switch from my PS 6.0 85 i been trying to hold off, but the availability of the 6.0 is just so annoying.

If you are making the migration from the PS 6.0 85 to the nCode 90 the change will be a BIT more difficult than from the 85 to the Tour 90, IMHO. The Tour 90 is VERY similiar to the 6.0 85, but a bit more forgiving.

Just curious, how many people following this thread actually made the change to the nCode 90 at some point along the way? Of this number, how many still play it? I have, as you know, gone back to the Tour 90.

Best,

Craig

I am down to 1 ps 6.0 85.

MTXR
12-05-2005, 05:52 PM
Didn't know that you went back to the tour 90 from the ncode. I can't hit at all with the tour 90 for some reason. It just feels too light and unstable. I don't really care if its a bit muted, I play with a dampner anyway.

doriancito
12-05-2005, 05:53 PM
i jsut loved the popping sound of it!

BreakPoint
12-05-2005, 09:15 PM
Didn't know that you went back to the tour 90 from the ncode. I can't hit at all with the tour 90 for some reason. It just feels too light and unstable. I don't really care if its a bit muted, I play with a dampner anyway.

Hmmm...that doesn't sound right. You find the Tour 90 too light and unstable but not the nCode 90? Are you sure you weren't using the Asian version of the Tour 90 or the Tour 95 instead? I think most people will agree that the Tour 90 plays heavier than the nCode 90 does.

joe1987
12-06-2005, 02:41 AM
Yes, I second that. The Tour 90 plays heavier.

MTXR
12-06-2005, 10:20 AM
I dunno, i am pretty sure... I don't have a scale or anything...

The ncode 90 felt heavier than my 6.0 85 and my tour 90.

I am pretty sure i got the US version... I heard the asian version says "st vincent process" on it, and well mine doesnt have that.

It could of been the crap quality control wilson has....

but yes my tour 90 feels light. I don't like how it hits anyway... It could be the crap strings i have on it. Some hybrid... I guess to figure out which i like best i have to string all my racquets with the same string and tension...

Ncode is on the way. So i have 3 players racquets to play with.

BounceHitBounceHit
12-06-2005, 07:25 PM
It's been my impression the Tour 90 plays w/ a significantly greater perceived 'heft' than the nCode 90 and is at the same time a bit less maneuverable, particularly at net. I think this is reflected in their respective swing weights. Again, in all fairness, I find them both very stable. The Tour 90 is certainly closer in 'feel' to the PS 6.0 85. The nCode seems much more 'muted' in my experience. CC

LafayetteHitter
12-06-2005, 08:32 PM
I have two Ncode 90's and they weigh in right at 12.7 and 12.8 ounces strung with overgrips and feel very similar so I would say Wilson did a good job keeping the specs close on them, although others may have different results in quality control issues with Wilson. I was curious if some of you could share the strung with overgrip weights on your Ncode 90's to see how close we all are (note: if you post a weight for a leaded or customized one please note this.)

BounceHitBounceHit
12-07-2005, 06:03 PM
I think our old friend Fabrice Leroy has 4 of my 6 nCode 90's, so he'll have to weigh them and do the post............Fabrice? Craig

BreakPoint
12-07-2005, 06:25 PM
The three US spec nCode 90's I demoed all weighed in at 12.9 oz. with only a small, light grommet dampener and overgrip. That's still about 0.5 oz. over spec (12.4 oz. w/o overgrip nor dampener).

LafayetteHitter
12-08-2005, 12:00 AM
My two Ncode 90's strung with overgrips and no dampener came in with one at 12.7 and one at 12.8 ounces. I'll have to compare my frames with Fabrice's racquets when i see him as his are most likely 5/8 grip just like my frames.

BounceHitBounceHit
12-08-2005, 04:38 PM
I weighed my two remaining frames. They are both factory 5/8 grips, stock, strung w/ Babolat VS gut at 67#. No dampener. Classic/orignal Tournagrip overwraps. 12.9 oz, and 12.7 oz. I wonder if Wilson would replace them? They are supposedly a 'matched pair'. CC

vantagepoint
12-08-2005, 04:45 PM
Craig Clark, you have one more step on the road back. I resumed hitting the Taiwan Ps 6.0 85, all 13 ounces of head-light glory, and I am in heaven.

You are close to illumination, Clark...

Captain Haddock
12-08-2005, 05:50 PM
I've now stocked up on 7 nCode 90's, all in 5/8 except for one in 1/2. I tried something that most purists would find strange (although Sampras himself apparently did the same thing late in his career): I changed the leather grips with synthetic ones (Wilson Cushion Aire). It removed about 10 grams from the handle. I intially did it because some of the original racquet owners (most frames came from TW posters, thanks TW!!!) had removed the original grips, and I did not have leather replacements at home, so I just went with what was readily available. I also thought it would cushion the impact and lighten the swingweight somewhat, which it did. Their weight now ranges from 12.2 to 12.5 oz strung. I still find them lighter and much more headlight than the Tour 90s. I hit every Friday with a good friend, who has been playing with his Pro Staff 85 since the 1980's. He strings his at 70 pounds with synthetic gut (I can only imagine how many restringing jobs one frame has gone though, but it's gotta be over 50! - these braided frames are absolute tanks). Although he is now down to 2 PS 85s (one Taiwanese and one Chinese), he swears that any other racquet trampolines on him. Whatever I am playing with that day, I always end up picking one of his PS 85s for a few minutes and each time, it's like magic. I tell myself it's too small for me, too demanding for match play, too ancient by today's standards, too good for me, yet it feels sooooo good. He also has a Tour 90, but does not like it as much. I personally find, like most posters here, the Tour 90 to be more head-heavy, and softer in flex than the nCode version. The Tour 90 plows through the ball better, like an RD-7, for instance, but flex-wise and maneuvrability-wise, the nCode 90 feels closer to the PS 85 than the Tour 90 in relation to the 85, IMO. These are heavy racquets by today's standards, no doubt. Yet when I think that I was using a 14-ounce wood racquet when I was 12 years old, and a 13-ounce graphite in my late teens, it seems that it's all a matter of relative standards. 10-ounce racquets feel like toys to me, hollow, unnaturally stiff. I don't play that badly with, say, a Pure Drive, or a 300G, and there are a few tweeners out there that I like (even the dreaded Prince Bandit MP, for some reason) but I don't enjoy their feel quite as much. Like Craig, and many here, I periodically get down on myself, and think it is time to upgrade to something bigger, lighter, easier to play with, but I always go back to 12 oz players frames. That's the Yo-Yo diet of the thirty-something player, isn't it?

omigod
12-08-2005, 06:23 PM
I weighed my two remaining frames. They are both factory 5/8 grips, stock, strung w/ Babolat VS gut at 67#. No dampener. Classic/orignal Tournagrip overwraps. 12.9 oz, and 12.7 oz. I wonder if Wilson would replace them? They are supposedly a 'matched pair'. CC

My 2 racquest are also 12.7 and 12.9oz. strung w/ Babolat VS Gut 17 (3/8 grips) at 65#, No dampener, Wilson White Overgrips.

Both were a little bit out of my preferred spec anyway (12.6 even balance). I ended up getting them "customized" so now I have a matched pair. Well, at least as matched as possible.

BounceHitBounceHit
12-14-2005, 10:27 AM
It is indeed a 'yo-yo' experience! I've tried a number of tweeners as well, and God knows I can serve like a demon with some of them, the Babolat PD+ in particular. Nonetheless, I end up sacrificing control off the ground and watching sitter volleys stray long or wide. Soon I am yearning for the 'feel'-and that is EXACTLY the right word, FEEL, of the classic players' frames.

As a child psychiatrist with an interest in neural development, I'd tell you that it probably has a whole lot to do with what you 'trained your brain' to use when you first began playing. In essence, we've grooved sub/unconscious aspects of our neurological apparatus to produce w/in millieseconds a whole series of highly specialized biomechanical responses predicated on a VERY rapid and detailed analysis of a data set concerning an incoming tennis ball as perceived by our sensory organs. This data is in fact so complex that it would take super-computers hours to analyze. Thus ANY change in the tool(s) (ie frames, strings, etc) used can have MAJOR impact on performance.

The moral? Well I am blessed to be best friends with a guy who is one of the most successful Divison I college tennis coaches in country, as well as being just a fantastic person. As Geoff says, 'better pick one and stay with it!'.

I am trying to follow his advice........... :cool:

Craig

I've now stocked up on 7 nCode 90's, all in 5/8 except for one in 1/2. I tried something that most purists would find strange (although Sampras himself apparently did the same thing late in his career): I changed the leather grips with synthetic ones (Wilson Cushion Aire). It removed about 10 grams from the handle. I intially did it because some of the original racquet owners (most frames came from TW posters, thanks TW!!!) had removed the original grips, and I did not have leather replacements at home, so I just went with what was readily available. I also thought it would cushion the impact and lighten the swingweight somewhat, which it did. Their weight now ranges from 12.2 to 12.5 oz strung. I still find them lighter and much more headlight than the Tour 90s. I hit every Friday with a good friend, who has been playing with his Pro Staff 85 since the 1980's. He strings his at 70 pounds with synthetic gut (I can only imagine how many restringing jobs one frame has gone though, but it's gotta be over 50! - these braided frames are absolute tanks). Although he is now down to 2 PS 85s (one Taiwanese and one Chinese), he swears that any other racquet trampolines on him. Whatever I am playing with that day, I always end up picking one of his PS 85s for a few minutes and each time, it's like magic. I tell myself it's too small for me, too demanding for match play, too ancient by today's standards, too good for me, yet it feels sooooo good. He also has a Tour 90, but does not like it as much. I personally find, like most posters here, the Tour 90 to be more head-heavy, and softer in flex than the nCode version. The Tour 90 plows through the ball better, like an RD-7, for instance, but flex-wise and maneuvrability-wise, the nCode 90 feels closer to the PS 85 than the Tour 90 in relation to the 85, IMO. These are heavy racquets by today's standards, no doubt. Yet when I think that I was using a 14-ounce wood racquet when I was 12 years old, and a 13-ounce graphite in my late teens, it seems that it's all a matter of relative standards. 10-ounce racquets feel like toys to me, hollow, unnaturally stiff. I don't play that badly with, say, a Pure Drive, or a 300G, and there are a few tweeners out there that I like (even the dreaded Prince Bandit MP, for some reason) but I don't enjoy their feel quite as much. Like Craig, and many here, I periodically get down on myself, and think it is time to upgrade to something bigger, lighter, easier to play with, but I always go back to 12 oz players frames. That's the Yo-Yo diet of the thirty-something player, isn't it?

BounceHitBounceHit
12-29-2005, 08:37 AM
I am curious if on this thread we have any players who have used BOTH the nCode 90 and i Prestige mid? I seem to keep gravitating back to three frames: nCode 90, Tour 90, or i Prestige mid.

Comments?

Best,

Craig

omigod
12-30-2005, 03:25 AM
I am curious if on this thread we have any players who have used BOTH the nCode 90 and i Prestige mid? I seem to keep gravitating back to three frames: nCode 90, Tour 90, or i Prestige mid.

Comments?

Best,

Craig

I used iPrestige Mid Plus. The iPrestige feels stiffer. The feel os also razor sharp. Because of the nCode 90's softer feel and more flexible frame, I feel I could "play" more with my shots. i.e. delicate shots.

Bought the nCode because I didn't stock up on the iPrestige! I altered the balance of nCode 90 to HL 32cm as I am used to the balance of my old iPrestige racquets.

It has taken about 10 - 15 hours of game time to get used the new racquet tho. No way I am using anything else for a while.

BounceHitBounceHit
02-25-2006, 08:03 PM
Greetings Fellow Tennis Addicts,

Believe it or not it's been almost two years (20 months, I think) since I originally posted this review of the nCode 6.1 90. During that time MOST (not all, come on!) of my playing time has been with this stick in hand. Yes, Ive had a fling with the iPrestige mid. True, I took a Babolat PC mid with me to the Land of NBMJ (Amelia Island). I even teased you with some degree of affection (albeit short-lived) for the Babolat Aero Drive. But when it came right down to it, when I wanted to REALLY play (and win) I picked up my n 6.1 90's. Well lads, that day has now past.

Why, you might ask? The full answer is complex, but truth is I think NBMJ is right. At the 5.0 level where I'm now back playing, you just cant cough up too many short balls. Further, when you are put under pressure you need to respond w/ something a little better than just a firm shot back. So............

After trying to learn to love the n Code 6.1 95, I picked up first a Fischer Extreme Pro FT, and then a M Speed 105. Well boys and girls, it just could be time for a new romance!

The M Speed 105 is NOT a frame I would have selected based on specs. I generally don't like head sizes over 100si and have found other frames at less than 12oz just plain flimsy feeling. But not this puppy. Plus it looks cool and the two frames I picked up (from our TW boards pal Fabrice Leroy) are almost identical (read that as quality control). I've only hit once, but stay tuned. I spent two hours today on court w/ my old pal (and tennis nemesis) Tim (yes, he of the HH 4.3 granny stick and 5.5-6.0 playing level). We were working out two of his best juniors and man was I impressed with this frame!

In brief:

Groundstrokes: stable; powerful, lots of spin. Good accuracy. Didn't see many shots fly.

Transition shots: will take some getting used to be I carved the slice approach pretty well. Missed a couple long, but that is to be expected.

Volleys: VERY stable at net. Set the frame, firm your wrist, and step. Voila!

Serve/Overhead: this thing is crazy on the serve-I was hitting probably 10-15% more pace and getting LOADS of spin on second serves.

Comfort: felt fine-I would probably string tighter so I'll let you know if it's different when the string tension is higher.

And it's basically black!!!!!!!!!!! :)

CC

Keifers
02-25-2006, 08:16 PM
Wow, that's a surprise, Craig. I'm excited for you though.

Can you give some details about string/tension -- now and what you'd like to use next? And have you made any mods to the frame(s) at all? Overgrips?

Also, I'm curious about the specs of your two 105s, as measured by the factory. Thanks.

BreakPoint
02-25-2006, 11:20 PM
Wow, Craig, that's quite a change from the nCode 90, isn't it? Just out of curiosity, are you going to try the M-Speed 98 also? I would think that the smaller headsize would be closer to what you're used to, no?

I'm thinking of trying the 98 version myself. So are you saying that if I like the feel of the PS 6.0 and nCode 90 that I should like the M-Speeds, too? What about the unconventional grip shape of the Fischers that some complain about compared to the Wilson grip shape?

Thanks

joe1987
02-26-2006, 12:11 AM
woah..Big change craig.
What about the pog os? trying that too?

BounceHitBounceHit
02-28-2006, 06:15 AM
Good Morning Breakpoint, Keifers, Joe, Fabrice, and All!

OK, I admit it. I am a tennis neurotic. There, I said it! :)

After my initial gush over the Fischer M Speed 105, I am about to temper my response. NOT retract, just temper.

I played it again on Sunday and Monday. Four hours of hitting (two 2 hour sessions, one at 7:30am the other at 3pm) on Sunday and one and a half on Monday. My hitting partner on Sunday is easily a 5.5. Monday I hit w/ a former top 50 WTA player. So these guys can play.

I STILL like the Fischer, but don't imagine it will be my ultimate frame. The basic responses I had to it (and posted here) remain the same. It is a stable, comfortable, sweet feeling frame with which I can serve VERY well. I think some of you who like the characteristic Wilson PS 'feel' might indeed be well served to try this one. They share many qualities.

HOWEVER (OK, here comes the qualification/disclaimer) once I started to hit out more, to try and be more aggressive, I again found that I missed too many balls long or that some 'flew' on me. Now maybe this is string/tension related. Maybe it is the humidity. Maybe my moon is in Venus and not Jupiter. I truly don't know. What I DO know is the when I picked up first my n6.1 95, and then ultimately the n6.1 90 things changed for the better.

As a psychiatrist I have to tell you that to some degree we are all well served to recognize these experiences tie in with issues of personality. I don't like to lose points on my errors! (yet I love to serve and volley-what a paradox, yes?!) Maybe I'd win more by hitting more big, unreturnable serves. I don't know, b/c I can't bring myself to stay with the Babolat PD+ (the frame I clearly serve best when using) long enough to find out!! Meanwhile though, it has been great fun hitting lots of different frames and sharing my responses here.

Breakpoint, NBMJ, Fabrice, and many others.........you guys have made this part of the mighty game of tennis more fun. For this I thank you!! :cool:

CC

NoBadMojo
02-28-2006, 07:29 AM
Greetings Fellow Tennis Addicts,

Believe it or not it's been almost two years (20 months, I think) since I originally posted this review of the nCode 6.1 90. During that time MOST (not all, come on!) of my playing time has been with this stick in hand. Yes, Ive had a fling with the iPrestige mid. True, I took a Babolat PC mid with me to the Land of NBMJ (Amelia Island). I even teased you with some degree of affection (albeit short-lived) for the Babolat Aero Drive. But when it came right down to it, when I wanted to REALLY play (and win) I picked up my n 6.1 90's. Well lads, that day has now past.

Why, you might ask? The full answer is complex, but truth is I think NBMJ is right. At the 5.0 level where I'm now back playing, you just cant cough up too many short balls. Further, when you are put under pressure you need to respond w/ something a little better than just a firm shot back.

CC

aha Craig..another midsize user sees the light and becomes a former midsized user. welcome to the world of the enlightened, and feel free to back me up whenever i get attacked for not recommendng midsized frames to people.

not knowing your game, i can offer this unsolicited advice. assuming you like to experiment and work on your game as much as you like to play around with the gear, now could be the time to add more to your stroke production inventory and ramp up your game. impt to realize that the stringbed of your frame isnt inconsistent..you are inconsistent with your new gear. thinking you must be a flatter ball hitter, it's good your balls are sometimes sailing long now with your new gear....i dont suggest strnging tighter, rather i suggest learning to hit with more spin..what you may need to do now is to incorporate a bit more spin into your ground game and you will soon find that those balls will be landing inside the court, you will be ralleying with more safety margin along with more power and your game will have more variety as you would still be able to flatten the ball out at times since that is already in your memory bank. your racquet really supports that now. i've worked with old schoolers like you before, and this approach really works and makes peoples' games more reliable, more powerful and imposing and also more varied. the key is to use essentially the same racquethead speed for all those types of shots. you can make the change via a small change in your stroke, a small change in your grips, etc. if interested, when next you get to the island, we can work on this a bit. bye the way, doug quit over there..i was also teaching there and i quit as well and now the place is being run by a TP who wouldnt know a volley from a saw palmettto.. we both quit there under a very dysfunctional situation and I dont recommend the Ritz Carlton Amelia Island to anyone for tennis. Doug was there for 13 years and didnt get a thank-you or anything (and as you know he is very qualifed and engaging, and a really good guy)
I also agree with you about the Fischer frames..they are very tightly spec'd and the quality is so good. later, Ed

Marius_Hancu
02-28-2006, 09:02 AM
Craig,

Fischer's, 90, 95 are all good frames, but you must improve your stroke production. Don't insist too much on tweaking the frames.

NBMJ is right on the money here.

Learn to play with a bat and get topspin out of it:-)

Captain Haddock
02-28-2006, 09:31 AM
Funny post, Craig! I did not expect you to like the M-Speed 105 that much, but it is truly a nice frame, which feels more like a midplus than an OS. I personally love the square Fischer grip shape. And it is true that the Fischer specs are always very tight. Many frames I have received from them had a handwritten sticker with the actual frames specs, and they varied by 1 or 2 grams at most. Excellent quality control. With better/tighter strings, you may even address the control problem with the M-Speed 105. The string pattern on that frame is so wide open that it can lauch balls at times, even though the high flex tends to pocket the ball in the racquet and offers nice control.
Like you, I tried to settle with a midsize racquet (POG mid), but I must admit that I am not good enough for it. I went back to a couple of 95 sq. in racquets and feel like I can get more punch, spin, and depth on most shots.

BounceHitBounceHit
02-28-2006, 11:33 AM
Greetings Fellas,

Thanks again for the psychological support! ;)

Ed/NBMJ: I will definitely take you up on that offer to work out this summer. I will be in touch and plan a few days in town. I can tell you are an exprienced pro b/c you go right to the heart of the matter! I have worked over the last 2-3 years to abandon my 'somewhere between a strong continental and true Eastern' FH grip and currently use a semi-western. Under pressure, I tend to 'slip back' to that more 'open faced' grip, and needless to say this must contribute to the errors, no doubt about it.

Where do you recommend I stay? I was only at the Ritz last time b/c I was there to speak to the GA State Psychiatric Association.

BTW, I think it absolutely stinks about Doug! Please tell him I said so. He was a very nice guy and excellent player. I travel quite a bit to lecture and you would be (unpleasantly) suprised at the overall poor quality of players who show up to 'teach' me at various clubs/resorts around the country. I've won more than a few free lessons over the years! ;) Doug stood out amongst those 'faux pros'!!! I am sure he will find success elsewhere.

Fabrice: My friend, the hunt continues! I can't wait to try those Pyramid Tours.

Marius: I am currently capable of sustaining a 100 shot plus cross court rally of both sides when drilling. I am pretty consistent. Nonetheless I do appreciate your insights.

In summary: look out midplus frames, here I come!

Please keep the good advice flowing......it makes the game more fun!! :D

Best,

CC

BreakPoint
02-28-2006, 12:39 PM
Breakpoint, NBMJ, Fabrice, and many others.........you guys have made this part of the mighty game of tennis more fun. For this I thank you!!

CC

You're quite welcome, Craig!

I particularly enjoy reading your experiences (or is that struggles? ;) ) with different racquets because I'm also mostly a serve-and-volleyer and I also do enjoy the Wilson ProStaff series of racquets. Thus, I find your experiences very applicable to my own situation. :D

BTW, you mentioned that when you returned to the nCode 90 that things got "better", so does that mean you haven't fully given up on the midsize just yet? Could the M-Speed 98 be a good compromise between the two? As I said before, your experience is really making me want to try out the M-Speed 98. Not too many racquets out there with that "PS feel".

Anyway, please keep us updated on your progress with the M-Speed.

Thanks and good luck!

NoBadMojo
02-28-2006, 01:01 PM
Ed/NBMJ: I will definitely take you up on that offer to work out this summer. I will be in touch and plan a few days in town. I can tell you are an exprienced pro b/c you go right to the heart of the matter! I have worked over the last 2-3 years to abandon my 'somewhere between a strong continental and true Eastern' FH grip and currently use a semi-western. Under pressure, I tend to 'slip back' to that more 'open faced' grip, and needless to say this must contribute to the errors, no doubt about it.

Thanks Craig. I am told I am best at working with the better players as I seem to notice those small things which may be small but are often very important

Where do you recommend I stay? I was only at the Ritz last time b/c I was there to speak to the GA State Psychiatric Association.

If you're not pinned to the Ritz compound, I recommend the Elizabeth Pointe Lodge

BTW, I think it absolutely stinks about Doug! Please tell him I said so. He was a very nice guy and excellent player. I travel quite a bit to lecture and you would be (unpleasantly) suprised at the overall poor quality of players who show up to 'teach' me at various clubs/resorts around the country. I've won more than a few free lessons over the years! ;) Doug stood out amongst those 'faux pros'!!! I am sure he will find success elsewhere.

I will tell Doug this, and I see him quite often even though we no longer teach together. He's my best friend on the island. I'm not surprised at all by the quality of TP's you see...TP's are a dime a dozen..just plunk down some money and be a TP in a weekend...there are some good ones still tho. Doug was tired of the grind and the corporate atmosphere there was pathetic, plus he got tired of dealing with some of the people who seem quite similar to some of the people here on the board :O , and his body is starting to break down from the rigours of teaching. I still have vigour for this becase I've most always been a part timer having had a whole other career.

Just email me in advance and I'll hook you up w. hits, and you can take a lesson or two from me if you like..by the way, they are tearing down some of those har-tru courts...man i hate seeing tennis courts being taken out......best, Ed

CC

BounceHitBounceHit
02-28-2006, 07:02 PM
I am looking forward to the trip Ed. I like to try and set up hits in advance when I travel, so this will be perfect. Is there a 'best time' to come weather wise-I know it can get pretty hot/humid there in the mid-summer.

As for you other racquet lovers, I will keep the updates coming. For now I am back to the nCode 90's. BUT I did still hold on to my four Tour 90's (just in case) :) And of course I have four Head Pyramid Tours on their way from Fabrice.................

CC

NoBadMojo
02-28-2006, 08:07 PM
I am looking forward to the trip Ed. I like to try and set up hits in advance when I travel, so this will be perfect. Is there a 'best time' to come weather wise-I know it can get pretty hot/humid there in the mid-summer.



Depends on your version of hot Craig..usually there's an ocean breeze and I think summers are milder here than places like Atlanta, Richmond, DC, etc..well at least not nearly as humid and uncomfortable.
If you like to watch the WTAers, Bausch and Lomb week is a nice week here....perfect weather usually..maybe high of 75-80....it's in April

BounceHitBounceHit
03-01-2006, 06:32 AM
What week is the B&L? Would you mind to e mail me your private e mail again so we can take this offline? Mine is drclark@usa.net. CC

skraggle
03-03-2006, 12:07 PM
Craig-

One midplus-oversize frame you might want to try is the PK Heritage R. I've been playing this to get over arm troubles (worked like a charm), but have now gotten to where I'm playing my best tennis with this stick. It might be a little light for a player of your ability (I'm a lowly 4.0), but with a bit of lead it might be very effective...

Roy
05-03-2006, 08:51 PM
To Craig,

Great reviews indeed.

Just wondering if you've tried the Asian version of the ncode 90 ?

If positive, what are you thoughts ? That's what I play with along with my ncode 95 both strung with Timo mains and PSGD crosses at 57 pounds. They are both great rackets for me.

BounceHitBounceHit
05-07-2006, 05:57 PM
Gentlemen,

Always a pleasure trading experiences!

I have NOT tried the Asian nCode 90. How does it differ from the one I've played so long?

Recently I've stayed true (more or less, ;) ) to the nCode 90, but find myself thinking about the nCode 95 (I've played it a bit and love it, but it gives me shoulder pain I've NEVER had before), Babolat Pure Control Standard (love it but just hate the thought of joining the Dark Side, although Ed would be pleased to see me pick up a 98si frame........it's actually what I brought to Amelia Island when Doug and I hit last summer Ed), and of course my closet affair with the iPrestige mid.

Ahhh...........choices!

CC

To Craig,

Great reviews indeed.

Just wondering if you've tried the Asian version of the ncode 90 ?

If positive, what are you thoughts ? That's what I play with along with my ncode 95 both strung with Timo mains and PSGD crosses at 57 pounds. They are both great rackets for me.

Roy
05-07-2006, 09:57 PM
Craig,

Yep, so many choices indeed. I am tempted to be unfaithful to my ncodes and have a fling with the Fischer mspeed. I haven't played with one but have picked one up and really liked the balance. We'll see if I can remain faithful...

artworks
05-08-2006, 05:01 AM
Wow! I thought I'm alone searching daily for that freak racquet.

But now I'm settled with the nCode Tour 90s strung with Klip Legend Natural Gut @ 58lbs. I've had exact experience as was posted by Craig.

Roy
05-12-2006, 12:32 PM
For the lovers of the ncode 90,

Do try out the Yonex RDS 001 mid. It's a pleasant surprise.

BounceHitBounceHit
12-01-2008, 06:56 PM
It's STILL a great frame........ ;) CC

T1000
12-01-2008, 07:00 PM
For the lovers of the ncode 90,

Do try out the Yonex RDS 001 mid. It's a pleasant surprise.

I have them both and I think they're amazing. I love the n90s control and the rds 001's ability to hit flat balls without going long

J011yroger
12-01-2008, 07:06 PM
It's STILL a great frame........ ;) CC

That is just a shameless bump my friend :)

J

autumn_leaf
12-01-2008, 07:09 PM
It's STILL a great frame........ ;) CC

omg. you actually got one person to seriously respond x_X

drakulie
12-01-2008, 08:52 PM
This frame sucked royally.

(sorry, CC>>> but I simply hated this frame)

aimr75
12-01-2008, 08:59 PM
This frame sucked royally.

(sorry, CC>>> but I simply hated this frame)

what aspects did you hate about it?

Only ever tried it for a couple of hits.. so couldnt judge by that
________
Honda Cb250 Jade Specifications (http://www.honda-wiki.org/wiki/Honda_CB250_Jade)

drakulie
12-01-2008, 09:17 PM
^^^^ The feel at impact (felt tinny), the weight distribution (felt heavy to swing).

Not very good maneuvarability. Didn't have very good control (compared to other mids). etc,

(please note; this is compared to the other pro staffs)

toeknee
12-02-2008, 12:55 AM
Unlike a lot of ppl on here, I like my an90 a lot more than my ak90.

zapvor
12-02-2008, 04:24 AM
the n is lighter weightwise compared with the k

BounceHitBounceHit
12-05-2008, 03:00 PM
This frame sucked royally.

(sorry, CC>>> but I simply hated this frame)

No worries. I respect your opinion Drak. AND, we usually agree!! :) CC

ncode tour90
12-05-2008, 04:22 PM
this is a great racket end of story

maured01
12-06-2008, 09:32 AM
Craig, I enjoyed your 2004 review of the nCode Tour 90. My experience parallels what you described almost exactly, particularly on serve. I have been weaning over to the nCode 90 from Babolat Pure Control Original (swirl) and have come to the conclusion that while the weight is very similar, the balance of the PCO is slightly more to the head. I just can't get it around on serve like the nCode 90. I was wondering if you did a similar analysis of the K90 when it came out a couple years ago (more open string pattern etc.)? thanks.

In D Zone
12-06-2008, 08:34 PM
N90 Tour - love playing with this racquet! Much easier to swing than the K90 Tour.

I have both of these puppies in my bag - N90 is just better suited for my game

BounceHitBounceHit
12-07-2008, 12:17 PM
Craig, I enjoyed your 2004 review of the nCode Tour 90. My experience parallels what you described almost exactly, particularly on serve. I have been weaning over to the nCode 90 from Babolat Pure Control Original (swirl) and have come to the conclusion that while the weight is very similar, the balance of the PCO is slightly more to the head. I just can't get it around on serve like the nCode 90. I was wondering if you did a similar analysis of the K90 when it came out a couple years ago (more open string pattern etc.)? thanks.

Yes, I did. If you do a search you will find my review of the K90, written sometime around Jan 2006. Best, CC