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limitup
05-25-2006, 09:22 PM
On a forehand, should I purposely lay my wrist back and hold it there through contact - or is it just the forward motion of the elbow and then arm that lays it back and keeps it there? I mean, at least in the beginning, should I be consciously laying it back and holding it there?

Bungalo Bill
05-25-2006, 09:31 PM
On a forehand, should I purposely lay my wrist back and hold it there through contact - or is it just the forward motion of the elbow and then arm that lays it back and keeps it there? I mean, at least in the beginning, should I be consciously laying it back and holding it there?

You can do it several ways.

1. You can purposely lay it back on the backswing and leave it there through contact - this is perfectly fine.

2. You can lay it back using your forward motion and momentum in your swing. Once it lays back you can hit through the ball leaving it laid back - that is perfectly fine.

3. You can have some elasticity in the wrist on either way (laying it back through motion or by your own will), and allowing the natural sprining mechanism in the tendons of the wrist allow the hand to move forward. This is called a wrist release. At a biomechanics presentation the Mahboob went to it was referred to as an "educated wrist".

The wrist release is prevalent in professional players strokes. A lot of people who really don't know about it refer to it as someone FORCING their wrist forward. In this case, when you torque the wrist forward you can eventually incur tendonitis in the wrist. The wrist release is none of that. It is simply the natural response of your hand moving forward when the wrist or "rubber band-like" motion relaxes or releases.

Some players as they advance will provide a slight "pushing feel" in the hand to add pop and control. But this move is a delicate move.

limitup
05-25-2006, 09:55 PM
A wrist release before, at, or after contact?

I normally hit that way, "releasing" my wrist some at contact. Combined with pronating the wrist, I got it stuck in my head that this helps me create my topspin with my SW grip and low to high swing.

Thing is, I'm just too inconsistent - there's just such a small margin of error. Perhaps I do it wrong, but I've attributed most of the inconsistency to the wrist release. Maybe it's a more advanced tactic and I'm just not there yet.

I just got back from hitting balls and tonight I tried my hardest to keep my wrist laid back until well after contact. After a few minutes getting used to it, I proceeded to hit the best I've ever hit for 2+ hours and left the court feeling great. With the laid back wrist it just felt so much more solid, more pace, more consistent, everything.

I've watched tons of high speed video and from what I can tell most people have the wrist laid back until well after contact. Do you have any video that shows this educated wrist release? Or maybe I misunderstood that part of your post and even the educated wrist release is after contact?

Releasing the wrist before or at contact seems crazy now that I really think about it. You'd have to be awesome to do it consistently. Delicate is an understatement!

Bungalo Bill
05-26-2006, 05:24 AM
A wrist release before, at, or after contact?

I normally hit that way, "releasing" my wrist some at contact. Combined with pronating the wrist, I got it stuck in my head that this helps me create my topspin with my SW grip and low to high swing.

Thing is, I'm just too inconsistent - there's just such a small margin of error. Perhaps I do it wrong, but I've attributed most of the inconsistency to the wrist release. Maybe it's a more advanced tactic and I'm just not there yet.

I just got back from hitting balls and tonight I tried my hardest to keep my wrist laid back until well after contact. After a few minutes getting used to it, I proceeded to hit the best I've ever hit for 2+ hours and left the court feeling great. With the laid back wrist it just felt so much more solid, more pace, more consistent, everything.

I've watched tons of high speed video and from what I can tell most people have the wrist laid back until well after contact. Do you have any video that shows this educated wrist release? Or maybe I misunderstood that part of your post and even the educated wrist release is after contact?

Releasing the wrist before or at contact seems crazy now that I really think about it. You'd have to be awesome to do it consistently. Delicate is an understatement!

I think before this goes any further, we need to define the wrist release. It is not some thiing you "try" to do, it happens because you do not have enough tension in the wrist to keep it complete frozen.

If move your hand back and forth in front of you pretending you have a racquet in your hand, and having it relatively relaxed, if you move your hand back and forth freely, you will see the hand play catch up as you momentum goes back and forth.

This happens all day long in a professional stroke. That is a released wrist. It is not stuck in one spot and is allowed to let the hand move forward when the motion in your arm slows down.

Although this is a natural movement of the body, and nearly every pro hits this way, it still needs to be educated. First thing is, the muscles in the forearm need to be strengthened. If you have been playing for awhile, you probably have built up sufficient strength to control the racquet head properly and can execute a stroke with this freedom.

The other thing is you need to learn how much tension is right for you. A beginner will have more firmness in the wrist then an advanced player. This is because it is important for the beginner to feel the efforts that move the arm further up the arm. Like the shoulder. So from my point of view, I dont even introduce the wrist release but eventually I let it come naturally as I secretly build up the strength in the forearm.

And yes, I am crazy, even though Biomechanic experts see it, film proves it, and top coaches know about it. No matter how you slice it, the wrist release and a relaxed wrist in the professional stroke is painfully evident. Just open your eyes. Even the slo slo motion film of Rodger Federer shows the hand beginning to move forward - open your eyes.

So here you are blind man: Look at the wrist position at the takeback, it is not load back. Look at the wrist position when he brings the racquet forward, it rocks back tot he laid back position as it is being pulled forward, then look at the motion bringing it forward and the wrist plays catch up until the arm slows down. The wrist will come forward when the arm slows down and this happens at VARIOUS times. This is elementary.

http://www.uspta.com/html/e-lesson-Open%20stance%20forehand%202.swf

The elasticity, the rubberband like motion, the stretch, is the wrist release. Got it?

kevhen
05-26-2006, 05:38 AM
I thought last year, you were saying that the pros don't use their wrists prior to contact but just release the wrist after contact. I agree though that some wrist is involved in many shots but is usually kept to a minimum and is mostly part of a natural whippy stroke and not forced.

just out
05-26-2006, 05:40 AM
BB I agree, I think this should come naturally and for me to think about it during my stroke would be suicide and to introduce this to someone who is having problems with their forhand as something to think about while hitting would probably not be a good idea.

I guess I'm less of a technical/mechanical teacher in general, I find it interesting on this board how many folks think about mechanics a lot, not only when they practice but when they are playing matches. I could never have done this when I was competing, the few times I did it made things worse.

Bungalo Bill
05-26-2006, 05:47 AM
BB I agree, I think this should come naturally and for me to think about it during my stroke would be suicide and to introduce this to someone who is having problems with their forhand as something to think about while hitting would probably not be a good idea.

Exactly, I think this guy Limeitup, just wants to argue. Only an idiot would not realize that the wrist release is plain as day. What people think is the wrist release is something that you do or concentrate on. If you maintain some firmness in the grip, you automatically have elsaticity in the wrist. From there you can either force the wrist or hand into a laid back position or learn to let momentum do it as Haas clearly demonstrates and nearly all other pros.

However, this is not necessary if you feel you can't do it.

I guess I'm less of a technical/mechanical teacher in general, I find it interesting on this board how many folks think about mechanics a lot, not only when they practice but when they are playing matches. I could never have done this when I was competing, the few times I did it made things worse.

I agree and in reality? Believe it or not, so am I. I would never bombared people on a court with all this techno jargon. I have so many ways to demonstrate proper form without opening up a book of terms. I am actually quite the opposite. I simply setup up the body and arm motion to do what I want it to do without mentioning detailed facts. I watch and observe to see where adjustments need to be made. That is it. My background in technical knowledge simply helps me be a better coach.

JCo872
05-26-2006, 06:35 AM
I'll put up an example of the wrist release later today. From my observation, the wrist is laid back and down as far as possible as you pull towards the ball. Then if you just relax before contact the wrist comes forward on its own and meets the ball at 45 degrees on contact. There is no effort involved. The wrist then stays back at this fixed 45 degree angle through contact.

Take your hand and lay your wrist back as far as you can. Then just relax and feel it pop forward. That's really all that is involved. It's hardly much at all. But it can help the shot in a number of ways.

Interesting point about "technical/natural teaching and playing". My own perspective is that once you get your mechanics down and grooved you don't have to worry about them again. That, in fact, is the goal. Leyton Hewitt was once asked what grip he used on his forehand and he said he didn't know or care. But so many people have huge technical problems in their strokes that they won't get better until they fix the problems. That's why great players have been properly coached since a very young age. They get the mechanics out of the way early, and then can focus on the important things in a match. But so few people get good technical coaching early on and are plagued with ineffective technique that can lead to injury and to lousy shots.

just out
05-26-2006, 07:44 AM
Interesting point about "technical/natural teaching and playing". My own perspective is that once you get your mechanics down and grooved you don't have to worry about them again. That, in fact, is the goal. Leyton Hewitt was once asked what grip he used on his forehand and he said he didn't know or care. But so many people have huge technical problems in their strokes that they won't get better until they fix the problems. That's why great players have been properly coached since a very young age. They get the mechanics out of the way early, and then can focus on the important things in a match. But so few people get good technical coaching early on and are plagued with ineffective technique that can lead to injury and to lousy shots.

Good points, I agree about getting the mechanics out of the way but I'm not sure that it is always a result of good technical coaching, I know many high level players that developed their good mechanics early without "proper" coaching (sometimes just a parent or friend combined with the wall). I think back to when I met and taught certain juniors at a very young age and said to myself wow these kids seem to have almost naturally developed good strokes, how does that happen (if I could teach that formula I'd be rich!). For me it's less about correcting stroke mechanics and more about observation and feedback about the result of the stroke and what the person is really doing as they get in position and when they hit the ball, some people have a very good idea of what they look like and can learn from that, others don't. I'm always amazed at people who see themselves stroking the ball smoothly and effortlessly when they are actually hacking away and are very stiff (happens a lot, especially with adults). Adults learning the game are usually the ones who come in with more stroke mechanics issues.

JCo872
05-26-2006, 07:57 AM
Good points, I agree about getting the mechanics out of the way but I'm not sure that it is always a result of good technical coaching, I know many high level players that developed their good mechanics early without "proper" coaching (sometimes just a parent or friend combined with the wall). I think back to when I met and taught certain juniors at a very young age and said to myself wow these kids seem to have almost naturally developed good strokes, how does that happen (if I could teach that formula I'd be rich!). For me it's less about correcting stroke mechanics and more about observation and feedback about the result of the stroke and what the person is really doing as they get in position and when they hit the ball, some people have a very good idea of what they look like and can learn from that, others don't. I'm always amazed at people who see themselves stroking the ball smoothly and effortlessly when they are actually hacking away and are very stiff (happens a lot, especially with adults). Adults learning the game are usually the ones who come in with more stroke mechanics issues.

I have seen the exact same thing with some kids having naturally developed good strokes. No question about it. Especially on the serve. No matter how much technical data you throw at someone, they still have to find the rhythm and stroke on their own, and no coach can implant this. It takes natural ability and a good feel for the ball.

Interestingly enough, I read Safin's mother say that Marat seemed to magically pick up the game while his sister had to work a lot harder at getting mechanics down. And I recently heard Bagdhatis say that the game just came to him naturally with very little coaching.

However, I have never seen someone who was technically sound on all strokes without some coaching. If tennis was just forehands, say, then a kid could pick up the shot on his own and by fine. The tough part about tennis is the variety of shots. The forehand, the backhand, the slice, the volley, the serve, the kick serve, the flat serve, etc. At the pro level you have to be almost technically perfect on every shot. This is why, I think, you hear about pros having been being coached from the age of 5 on, often with their parents as being tennis pros.

But I agree completely that you can become too technical. Often learning comes, as John Yandell has wonderfully argued, simply by watching good players hit the ball.

rasajadad
05-26-2006, 08:06 AM
I was always told that in laying the wrist back it's stronger. Depending on your muscle strength the general rule is that almost all amateurs should lay it back.

Bungalo Bill
05-26-2006, 08:30 AM
I'll put up an example of the wrist release later today. From my observation, the wrist is laid back and down as far as possible as you pull towards the ball. Then if you just relax before contact the wrist comes forward on its own and meets the ball at 45 degrees on contact. There is no effort involved. The wrist then stays back at this fixed 45 degree angle through contact.

Take your hand and lay your wrist back as far as you can. Then just relax and feel it pop forward. That's really all that is involved. It's hardly much at all. But it can help the shot in a number of ways.

Interesting point about "technical/natural teaching and playing". My own perspective is that once you get your mechanics down and grooved you don't have to worry about them again. That, in fact, is the goal. Leyton Hewitt was once asked what grip he used on his forehand and he said he didn't know or care. But so many people have huge technical problems in their strokes that they won't get better until they fix the problems. That's why great players have been properly coached since a very young age. They get the mechanics out of the way early, and then can focus on the important things in a match. But so few people get good technical coaching early on and are plagued with ineffective technique that can lead to injury and to lousy shots.

I agree that when a coach can guide a player into good technical form without getting too technical, that creates an ideal learning situation. But as you know, this is not always the case and a coach needs to have emough information to adjust or unadjust his direction and guidance to help a player achieve their goals. Sometimes it can be very difficult to tell when the player has received enough information to go on. The coaching dillemma.

I have posted enough information on this board to share my stance on the ever controverisal "wrist release". No one can ever change my point of view on this because it is plain as day.

It is foolish to have people fix their wrists and leave them there because I do not believe this promotes the modern forehand and a fluid swing that can execute the forehands we see today. Elasticity in the wrist is the key word and it is very evident that pros have an elastic wrist that works well with the arm motion.

I searched on the internet for this wrist release information. I found something which I think explains everything I am trying to say. Sometimes hearing it from a different source can be all the information one needs. This information came from Mark at Revolutionary Tennis and I am with him fully on this and if people were honest, they would clearly see that my threads on this and Mark's comments here clearly match.

I think Mark did an excellent job in explaining what appears to be a difficult subject (with my emphasis) for people to understand. Now, when someone says it doesn't exist or they deny it (BeachTennis, limitup) you really have to question that. The evidence is clearly there in professional film.



================================================== ======

PRONATION


Welcome to the Holy Grail for tennis players, both now and a hundred, or even fifty, years ago. Back then tennis books didn't mention pronation, they mentioned the "use of the wrist" during the forehand swing. Now the 1970's came along and the establishment interpreted the "use of the wrist" to mean wristy, or floppy and declared it unwise to "use the wrist" because it was much too difficult to control the wristy floppy thing. Hence, tennis students were told to lock their wrists during the forehand swing to protect themselves from themselves. Ugh.

Well, I believe in you, in your human body. Sure, there are some people who are too this or too that in their manifestations of physical acts, but they too will follow the yellow brick road to find their way home.
The "use of the wrist" back then is what we call pronation today. The establishment didn't grasp it then, and still doesn't now. It's not wrist, it's pronation. Hallelujah.

Pronation means rotating the hand or forearm counter clockwise, so the palm faces forward, then downward, or, in the extreme, back. This has nothing to do with the degree of rotation, pronation merely describes the direction. If your hand was palm up and you rotated just 90 degrees to make it vertical, that forward direction is called pronation. The opposite is supination, rotating the hand or forearm clockwise so the palm either faces upwards or, if it was facing down to begin with, it turns upwards to face forward.
http://www.revolutionarytennis.com/jpg/forehand/haas.jpg
Back to pronation below... (http://www.revolutionarytennis.com/step8.html#pronation2)

Pronation is just a fancy word for rolling the hand and forearm into the ball when you hit it. In most pros with rocket forehands, like Tommy Haas here, the racket face rolls over, creating a unique after-effect. But an after-effect of what, a fixed wrist or a pronating one?

During contact, most of the time the force of the ball tweaks the racket face adversely, either causing the racket face to close or open. In the exception, if you hit the ball pluperfectly in the center of the racket with just the right upward angle of lift, the ball doesn't tweak the racket face.

Now your job is to keep your racket face vertically against the ball as you brush up low to high. How can you do this when the ball's tweaking the racket face? You can either hit the ball pluperfectly, or you can plan to counter the ball tweaking against the racket face. You can plan to apply a counter force.

Giving a friend a high five illustrates a counter force. If your hand goes backwards and down on a high five, you didn't counter your friend's hand. Repeating the action, if you counter(force) your friend's hand yours remains up high.

Good measures to counter the tweaking of the racket face at contact are keeping your hand firm and your wrist strong, but these are more reactive rather than active measures. The status quo asks that you keep your wrist fixed during the whole swing, but that doesn't provide a counter force to the contact, it merely resists. Pronation applies an active counter force to prevent the racket face from tweaking at contact.

Does the wrist snap or break? Not at all, that's for a serve, or overhead. Does the wrist roll over? No, that's an exaggeration. But the counter force of the hand, and thus wrist, plays an integral part in what is the last ingredient for racket acceleration.

First, your wrist has a natural spring to it. To illustrate, with your forehand elbow by your side, extend your forearm straight away from you and keep your hand on an edge, straight up and down. Now lay your hand, or wrist, back. Feel the tension in there. Keep the forearm still and relax that tension. Hopefully your hand springs back to its original position. If not, repeat the action but angle your hand downward somewhat before you lay it back.

The wrist-as-spring idea is evident in the preparatory hand action you see in all the pros' pictures (above) during the backswing, the hand lays back, or the wrist cocks back. The hand, too, flexes around the wrist, as the forearm around the elbow, the biceps around the shoulder. Denying the natural use of your hand in this manner is like trying to walk with your shoelaces tied to each other.

Second, the arm naturally turns inward. When you walk the palm either faces your leg or behind you. If you extend your arm away from you palm side up, you'll lower the arm and the palm rotates to face your body. The arm naturally pronates.

Adding wrist flexibility and pronation with an arm that is flexible throughout the swing creates the proverbial cannon.

================================================== =======================

Now on the other hand to make things fair, there are different degrees in the use of the wrist in the shot. Here Agassi on this shot maintains the laid back position longer but it is clear that he still has elasticity in the wrist as he brings the racquet forward.

http://www.uspta.com/html/e-lesson-Open%20stance%20forehand%201.swf

The wrist release is very misinterpreted.

kevhen
05-26-2006, 08:40 AM
So it's more about rotating the forearm forward than rotating the wrist forward or is there some of both? Interesting article Bill.

So much is going on in the modern forehand with the open stance, hips/rotating torso, shoulder, elbow, forearm, and wrist combined with western grips that it is all very complex but the pros make it look pretty simple but then they have practiced those shots about a million times to make it look so easy.

limitup
05-26-2006, 08:44 AM
Sorry you misunderstood what I said BB, I am not claiming it does not exist.

When I said I didn't see it in the videos, that must be because I was looking for something else. In my mind, the release involves more movement of the wrist. Not a snap or big push, but enough movement that the wrist is closer to straight at contact than 45 degrees. I think that's what I do/did, but hard to know for sure without filming myself. Obviously I'm wrong and that's not the way to do it, because I don't see many pros hitting with the wrist straight at contact. I simply misunderstood your definition.

All I was really saying is that it's obviously a pretty advanced tactic to incorporate into the stroke, as should be anything that introduces more variables into the swing - right? You don't teach beginners or low-level players to use a big loopy backswing do you?? All else being equal, it's a lot harder for a low-level player to be consistent if the angle of the racquet face is changing due to wrist movement right before contact. Right? We are not all pros like you BB.

That's what I was really getting at - how should *I* approach it as a 3.5 level player. I think it makes sense to copy lots of what the pros do, but there are some things that shouldn't be copied until you have the skills. I obviously don't yet have the skills to be consistent if my wrist is moving a lot right before contact. Maybe my "release" involves too much movement, or maybe I should try to have as little movement as possible for now.

Bungalo Bill
05-26-2006, 08:49 AM
So it's more about rotating the forearm forward than rotating the wrist forward or is there some of both? Interesting article Bill.

Well, I think you are seeing it Kevhen. It is both. Pronation and wrist flex works together to produce that cannon like forehand.

So much is going on in the modern forehand with the open stance, hips/rotating torso, shoulder, elbow, forearm, and wrist combined with western grips that it is all very complex but the pros make it look pretty simple but then they have practiced those shots about a million times to make it look so easy.

Kevhen, if for some reason you ever took a lesson from me, you would never hear me mention all of this. Unless you had a rigid arm. If I could simply show you three areas of development, real simple areas, and leave the complicated mess to me and my being able to analyze, you would rarely hear me talk about the wrist release unless asked or I felt it was important to mention. Cheers.

limitup
05-26-2006, 08:56 AM
Clearly there is a difference between BB's definition of "wrist release" and pronation. BB, you can call me argumentative now, but I've read lots of your posts about the wrist release and not once do you use the words pronate or pronation. I mentioned my pronation combined with "release" in my 2nd post. In your reply to that you said:

I think before this goes any further, we need to define the wrist release ... If move your hand back and forth in front of you pretending you have a racquet in your hand, and having it relatively relaxed, if you move your hand back and forth freely, you will see the hand play catch up as you momentum goes back and forth ... That is a released wrist. It is not stuck in one spot and is allowed to let the hand move forward when the motion in your arm slows down.

Nowhere in your definiton do you use the words pronate or pronation. In fact, based on your definition in this thread it appears you are referring only to movement of the wrist at its joint, and saying nothing about rotation of the forearm in any way.

I'm really NOT trying to be argumentative, just pointing out that maybe the reason you think people like to argue with you is that you often say things that are very unclear, contradictory, or just don't make sense.

Thanks for the replies though ... it all helps.

kevhen
05-26-2006, 08:56 AM
I am sure you could help me with my forehand. I should find a way to video it to get some pointers on it.

I do see the young guys who played college tennis with the wrist laid back at the start and then really whipping through the ball and generating good pace and spin without overexerting themselves. They tend to keep the elbow down by the side and are mostly using the forearm with the wrist coming late in the swing like right at the start of contact and following through the swing.

When I rally with my topspin forehand, I tend to not do much with wrist and just a little bit of pronation. When going for a lot I will use more wrist and pronation but have alot more balls sail long then too as the timing is more difficult. Still a work in progress...

Bungalo Bill
05-26-2006, 09:07 AM
Clearly there is a difference between BB's definition of "wrist release" and pronation. BB, you can call me argumentative now, but I've read lots of your posts about the wrist release and not once do you use the words pronate or pronation. I mentioned my pronation combined with "release" in my 2nd post. In your reply to that you said:

Man, you are argumentive. :) You can still pronate the wrist down and not have any flex in the wrist at all. We are not talking about that. We are talking about the forward motion of the wrist while it is pronating.

You are right I rarely if ever talk about pronation for my own reasons already mentioned many times.

My conversation here is the role of the wrist and its use in the forehand stroke. If you have read LOTS of my posts you would see that the wrist layback, momentum, forward swing, forward movement of the palm, the relaxed wrist, the SPRING in the wrist is exactly what Mark is talking about.

You just claimed that if you maintain a FIXED LAID BACK WRIST YOU HIT THE BALL BETTER AND IMPLIED I WAS CRAZY. You are flat out wrong. So answer that!

We are only talking about the wrist release and it is plain as day that pros DO flex the wrist (wrist release) and my description of it is consistent, accurate, insightful, and real.

Read the article about the SPRING IN THE WRIST and FLEX in the wrist which you denied and implied was not there.

Bungalo Bill
05-26-2006, 09:15 AM
I am sure you could help me with my forehand. I should find a way to video it to get some pointers on it.

Well I am glad you see it now and have evidence to support it. Most likely if you are relaxing your wrist in the back swing and maintaining some firmness on the handle you are doing it already. This is not something to make a big deal about. The point is, the pros do not have a fixed, solid wrist on their shots.

When you get into the whipping, that takes practice. You know I dont like to use the term whip. It is not accurate in what is happening. Some players can help their wrist release some with a pushing in the hand area. But this is delicate.

For now, just concentrate on keeping the wrist relaxed on your takeback, use the non-dominant hand to help with the takeback and backswing, have reasonable pressure on the handle (enough to control the racquet) with your hand, then when your ready to bring the racquet forward keep the arm relaxed through the forward swing and allow the weight of the racquet to bring the hand the other way for your finish. Do this slowly for awhile.

Dont slap the ball as what often gets misinterpreted. You still are hitting through the ball but you should feel relaxed and effortless doing so.

limitup
05-26-2006, 03:05 PM
You just claimed that if you maintain a FIXED LAID BACK WRIST YOU HIT THE BALL BETTER AND IMPLIED I WAS CRAZY. You are flat out wrong.

I said that *I* hit better that way. How can I be wrong when detailing my own personal experience? I think you just like to argue. :)

I guess I am not good enough to release my wrist much and remain consistent ... yet.

Bungalo Bill
05-26-2006, 03:39 PM
I said that *I* hit better that way. How can I be wrong when detailing my own personal experience? I think you just like to argue.

I guess I am not good enough to release my wrist much and remain consistent ... yet.

I thought you just wanted to argue with me, saying I haven't indicated what a wrist release was or is! lolz :mrgreen:

Just goes to show you the limited communication vehicle of the internet. More arguments ensue from misinterpretations. I am guilty to the max! :)

So, let's get this back on track.

You are! But maybe not to the extent Rodger Federer does. Hell, I would never let my wrist do the things he does. Way too loose/flowing for me. I have to maintain a good enough pressure on the handle for me as I dont nearly play as much as I should. I am sure as things started to come automatic, I would let loose a little. But hey, that's me.

If you want to keep a firmer wrist, great! Nothing wrong with that and it is a great way to play tennis.

pushing_wins
07-05-2006, 09:41 AM
A wrist release before, at, or after contact?

I normally hit that way, "releasing" my wrist some at contact. Combined with pronating the wrist, I got it stuck in my head that this helps me create my topspin with my SW grip and low to high swing.

Thing is, I'm just too inconsistent - there's just such a small margin of error. Perhaps I do it wrong, but I've attributed most of the inconsistency to the wrist release. Maybe it's a more advanced tactic and I'm just not there yet.

I just got back from hitting balls and tonight I tried my hardest to keep my wrist laid back until well after contact. After a few minutes getting used to it, I proceeded to hit the best I've ever hit for 2+ hours and left the court feeling great. With the laid back wrist it just felt so much more solid, more pace, more consistent, everything.

I've watched tons of high speed video and from what I can tell most people have the wrist laid back until well after contact. Do you have any video that shows this educated wrist release? Or maybe I misunderstood that part of your post and even the educated wrist release is after contact?

Releasing the wrist before or at contact seems crazy now that I really think about it. You'd have to be awesome to do it consistently. Delicate is an understatement!


i agree with you

wrist is released after contact

because your wrist is loose, as you slow your arm down after contact, the wrist/racquet breaks forward.