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tonysk83
05-28-2006, 07:11 PM
Searched but didn't find much, if anyone has links, they would be appreciated.

Anyways, I have stuck with my 1hbh and it is getting there. I am taking a private a week this summer, so that will help a lot. I am going to play quite a few clay(har-tru)tournaments this summer but I need to get my 1hbh down or atleast not such a big liability like it is now.

I played against my typical hitting partner on hartru and my forehand was better then it ever has been but my 1hbh was brutal. If he hit short and it didn't jump much, I was fine. When he put more topspin and it landed deep it was trouble. I was trying to just take it early, but that tends to be very difficult with a 1hbh. It was really my only option though. Lets say I was far on my forehand and had to run to my bh side so I couldn't take it early, my only option was basically to slice it, but then when I did that he tore it apart.

Anyone have any suggestions on this? Really looking for an approach to this. It was very frustrating. Just because on the clay I tend to stay farther behind the baseline and can really hit my forehand hard, but when I am far back, the backhand just can't work good from that deep so I get out of my comfort zone.

Bungalo Bill
05-28-2006, 09:48 PM
Lets say I was far on my forehand and had to run to my bh side so I couldn't take it early, my only option was basically to slice it, but then when I did that he tore it apart.

Anyone have any suggestions on this?

You could be trying to hard on your onehander. Or, you might have too big of a backswing or taking the wrong hand pattern on it. It could also be that you are slow in recovery. This can happen because you are not as confident in the backhand and tend to watch your shot and not moving back to position at the same time.

It could also be a shot selection choice that you perform with your forehand while in a precarious position.

freelans
05-29-2006, 09:30 AM
You could be trying to hard on your onehander. Or, you might have too big of a backswing or taking the wrong hand pattern on it. It could also be that you are slow in recovery. This can happen because you are not as confident in the backhand and tend to watch your shot and not moving back to position at the same time.

It could also be a shot selection choice that you perform with your forehand while in a precarious position.

Shortening my backswing helped me on deep shots to my backhand as well as improving my timing.

jackson vile
05-29-2006, 10:45 AM
With the 1hbh you really and I mean really have to pay attention to your set up, set up really eary and get into proper position everytime. It does not have the large margin for error like the 2hbh.

On another note you can try droping and slicing, you can't 1hbh everything, just remember that tennis is about natural happening,you can't force things.

You can only do what you can do with the ball in certain situations end of story.

Keep your racket high and up drop it rotate and let the racket do the work, all your enegry should becoming form the racket drop and rotation and you oponents hitting speed.

Almost kinda like a bunt but with a fallow through up as the ball leaves, you can't force it just remember that, relax and let it happen.

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 10:57 AM
With the 1hbh you really and I mean really have to pay attention to your set up, set up really eary and get into proper position everytime. It does not have the large margin for error like the 2hbh.

But Oscar says preparing early is a myth. What do you mean prepare early? I have more time then I think right?

On another note you can try droping and slicing, you can't 1hbh everything, just remember that tennis is about natural happening,you can't force things.

Well you have a point about tennis having natural movements and things involved. But tennis is a technical sport as well. Many people have nto develop the correct muscle sequence to fire for a specific stroke. Some people fire a different muscle which forces them into a bad habit if uncorrected.

Much like physical therapy is needed to help someone fire the right muscles in sequence consistently, tennis is also the same.

You can only do what you can do with the ball in certain situations end of story.

What? Can you please explain what you mean here? Your little "end of story" was a bit premature.

Keep your racket high and up drop it rotate and let the racket do the work, all your enegry should becoming form the racket drop and rotation and you oponents hitting speed.

Almost kinda like a bunt but with a fallow through up as the ball leaves, you can't force it just remember that, relax and let it happen.

So what you are saying is the SLICE backhand is hit with less effort than the topspin backhand. This is because the nature of the spin and what it does in the air right?

If someone let's the racquet do the work is there anything in your tip that can be misunderstood or executed incorrectly???????? If I asked a person to draw some objects but he couldn't see the diagram to draw, would the person be able to making his drawing look exactly the same with only my verbal directions???? :cool:

tonysk83
05-29-2006, 12:00 PM
So I assume my swing should be more straight acorss my body. I know my pro has helped me with this but never as high as it can bounce on the clay. He tells me I should swing straight across and just let the ball fall into the court. If it is too high for that he says to slice it.

jackson vile
05-29-2006, 03:13 PM
So I assume my swing should be more straight acorss my body. I know my pro has helped me with this but never as high as it can bounce on the clay. He tells me I should swing straight across and just let the ball fall into the court. If it is too high for that he says to slice it.

The racket is back and vertical to almost vertical, you let it drop and pull through as you rotate the shoulders and hips, once you feel the ball sinks into the strings you will move the racket up as you continue to rotate the shoulders and hips to an open position.

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 03:15 PM
The racket is back and vertical to almost vertical, you let it drop and pull through as you rotate the shoulders and hips, once you feel the ball sinks into the strings you will move the racket up as you continue to rotate the shoulders and hips to an open position.

Really, you continue to rotate the shoulders? Is this good teaching for the onehanded backhand? What can go wrong with your "view" on things? What controls the shoulders from overrotating?

http://www.uspta.com/html/e-lesson-Backhand%20back%20view.swf

jackson vile
05-29-2006, 03:29 PM
But Oscar says preparing early is a myth. What do you mean prepare early? I have more time then I think right?



Well you have a point about tennis having natural movements and things involved. But tennis is a technical sport as well. Many people have nto develop the correct muscle sequence to fire for a specific stroke. Some people fire a different muscle which forces them into a bad habit if uncorrected.

Much like physical therapy is needed to help someone fire the right muscles in sequence consistently, tennis is also the same.



What? Can you please explain what you mean here? Your little "end of story" was a bit premature.



So what you are saying is the SLICE backhand is hit with less effort than the topspin backhand. This is because the nature of the spin and what it does in the air right?

If someone let's the racquet do the work is there anything in your tip that can be misunderstood or executed incorrectly???????? If I asked a person to draw some objects but he couldn't see the diagram to draw, would the person be able to making his drawing look exactly the same with only my verbal directions???? :cool:

The thing is that a lot of shots are born out of what just naturally happens, ie given a choice an object will take a natural path straight down to drop to the ground.

This is called the path of least resistance, this is where the least amount of energy is lost, that is what tennis is about.

Sure there is manipulation to achive certain shots but it is still with the lines of least resistance for the particular movement.

The path of least resistance is a natural path, that is why tennis is all about relaxing and using stored energy.

Improper movemnts are born out of forcing movments instead of relaxing and letting them naturally happen, same with swinging a bat, golf club, throughing a punch ect.

The body want to naturally work as a whole however many people stop this from happening by attempting to force an out come.

This is because many (morons) are worried about the out come, the out come is unconsequential.

If you did everything right in the begining and fallowed it through you will end correctly, if you did not end correctly you should not be worried about he end rather the begining and then working down the chain.

Focusing on the end helps nothing it is only an indicator that something is wrong in the earlier parts of the motion.


You can only do what you can with the ball, end of story. You can't force out comes. You can't always hit a 155mph serve, you can't always slice, you can't always hit a line drive.


Your movements and reactions will be a result of the oponents movements and reactions. You can't force your opponent to do this or that so that you can do this or that,you do not have control over that, you will have a hard enough time having full control over your own results/actions


Really my coment for this stroke is almost 100% true for every stroke, you set up high, let it drop, staying relaxed the whole time, pulling through and fallowing through with some type of spin movment for that particular shot.


As for your coments about the drawing, it is funny you say this and I laugh, that is what many sketch artists do for the police and FBI. As for 100% the same, nothing will ever be 100%.

See you have a very mistaken way of thought, there is no 100% golden rule of motion to take in tennis.

There are just simply theories and ideas to help you properly execute your own natural movements that will be perfect for you and no one else.

No ones stokes look exactly the same and they shouldn't, It is like a skeleton, you fill in the rest to make it your won.

These are just my opinions, I am no mans god and I am god of no world.


Relax

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 04:02 PM
The thing is that a lot of shots are born out of what just naturally happens, ie given a choice an object will take a natural path straight down to drop to the ground.

So where does training come in to play? Yesterday, I took a brand spankin new player on the court. I let her just sort of find things naturally for a couple balls. Do you know what happened? Yeah, CRAP! So taking your advice I would be absolutely irresponsible if I didnt step in.

Guess what, in reality, I didnt let her find her "natural" path. I molded and shaped that stroke. It felt UNNATURAL for about 20 minutes! But as the brain leanred which muscles to fire first then and only then did it start feeling - NATURAL.

This is called the path of least resistance, this is where the least amount of energy is lost, that is what tennis is about.

Sorry pal, but you are an absolute looney if you think people get tennis naturally and with no intervention.

BeachTennis
05-29-2006, 05:08 PM
So where does training come in to play? Yesterday, I took a brand spankin new player on the court. I let her just sort of find things naturally for a couple balls. Do you know what happened? Yeah, CRAP! So taking your advice I would be absolutely irresponsible if I didnt step in.

Guess what, in reality, I didnt let her find her "natural" path. I molded and shaped that stroke. It felt UNNATURAL for about 20 minutes! But as the brain leanred which muscles to fire first then and only then did it start feeling - NATURAL.



Sorry pal, but you are an absolute looney if you think people get tennis naturally and with no intervention.

Pour water into cup and water take shape of cup

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 06:03 PM
Pour water into cup and water take shape of cup

Train up a child in the way he should go; and when he is old, he will not depart from it." (Pr22:6) ;)

jackson vile
05-29-2006, 07:47 PM
Pour water into cup and water take shape of cup


"Be like water making its way through cracks. Do not be assertive, but adjust to the object, and you shall find a way round or through it. If nothing within you stays rigid, outward things will disclose themselves.

Empty your mind, be formless. Shapeless, like water. If you put water into a cup, it becomes the cup. You put water into a bottle and it becomes the bottle. You put it in a teapot it becomes the teapot. Now, water can flow or it can crash. Be water my friend."=Bruce Lee

On concepts and theories of JKD

His concepts really are for life in general and can be aplied to many situations and facets of life

jackson vile
05-29-2006, 07:48 PM
Train up a child in the way he should go; and when he is old, he will not depart from it." (Pr22:6) ;)


All men must find their own way- Wise Man:mrgreen:

jackson vile
05-29-2006, 08:08 PM
So where does training come in to play? Yesterday, I took a brand spankin new player on the court. I let her just sort of find things naturally for a couple balls. Do you know what happened? Yeah, CRAP! So taking your advice I would be absolutely irresponsible if I didnt step in.

Guess what, in reality, I didnt let her find her "natural" path. I molded and shaped that stroke. It felt UNNATURAL for about 20 minutes! But as the brain leanred which muscles to fire first then and only then did it start feeling - NATURAL.



Sorry pal, but you are an absolute looney if you think people get tennis naturally and with no intervention.


I never said that you can find any way blindly, you are blind and ignorant for making that statement.


Like I said there are theories and concept that you aply, ie and semi open stance, using the body as a whole, leting the body work together, staying relaxed.

You can not make someone hit this or that way, you can only give them guidlines and they have to find it themselves end of story.

I see a lot of people come on here for advice, I ask them why are you here, go out there and aply what you have observed from other successful players, then make correction as needed.

The thing is that you dont' get is that you can not always be there, and you can not make them do this or that. They have to make observations and aplications that only they can.

Only they know when it feels right as they are moving through the motion, you do not, at best you can sometimes see it.

But it is still up to them to feel the corect path, when that shot feels so good and easy and the ball take off and you make one heck of a shot.


ie A 100m (and many other explosive related sports) sprinters faster run ever will be his/hers easiet and this is 100% fact, this is because all of the body neurons and thus various segments or muscles are all performing at peek efficiency !!To Gether!! these muscles firing at the right times keeping the inertia/stored energy going is what allows them to perform at such great speeds.

Same for the serve, you body's muscles already know how to coordinate with one another, when you stop thinking and just let it happen. You can't train a 9.78s 100m as that is something the best in the world will likely only do once.

Modern tennis is based 100% on the body's mechanics and the path of least resistance to get the most out of a shot.

The serve is the best example with unleashing stored energy and then to continue the inertia to further excelerate the racket to a higher and higher speed.


Tennis is all about being natural and relaxing and leting things happen, you can not force a 155mph serve, that is impossible.


Some people prefer to make simple things complicated, tennis is simple and all strokes are base on the same exact principals.

Keeping the racket high and back, pull racket though while using hips and shoulders, whip through at the end with some time of spin.

End of story, it is easy, I have only played tennis for 130hrs now I played last summer and part of fall and then this spring only. The more I have tried to make things happen the worse the results the more relaxed and the more I let it happen the better the results.

I can already hit as serve up to 115mph, and hit a heavy enough ball to tear out the racket from a person that is prepared for it and hit heavy spin regularly.

I am going to recored me and my wife playing soon, you will see what I am talking about.

Tennis is easy if one will just shut up and quit trying for a second and just relax and try to let it happen finding the natural way.


I aplied this to myself and I am beating 3 different 3.5 already, my wifes tennis looking just amazing, that is what I am going off.


You know what they say pops, out with the old and in with the new:mrgreen:

just out
05-30-2006, 06:35 AM
I also think the 1hbh is fine on clay, the ball sits up more (seems like more of a high bounce) and I think your timing is much different and that is probably your biggest adjustment. The ball really comes at you much faster on a hard surface, for me on the one handed backhand my timing is more consistent on a hard court because the bounce and location of the ball are more predictable. On clay it is more difficult to take balls on the rise because the bounce isn't always that consistent and you need to make more adjustments. Be patient and work on your footwork, it is much harder for most players to make small adjustments on the backhand side than on the forehand and that is why your forehand probably didn't suffer that much. Keep working at it though and you will adjust.

Love when these things get philosophical. I'm with you on this jackson vile. One of the reasons I started posting on this board was because I think many people come here looking for answers and expect that the only way they can/will improve is through the intervention of a pro or instructor (I run into many people who have that mindset). In my experience as a teaching pro and a player who was mostly self-taught I completely disagree. This may be true for some who have very little self-awareness and can not make corrections through observation and self-correction, but it certainly is not a requirement to reach a high level in tennis.

IMO this is also perpetuated by tennis pros who don't want to give up that repeat business.

Rickson
05-30-2006, 06:51 AM
Searched but didn't find much, if anyone has links, they would be appreciated.

Anyways, I have stuck with my 1hbh and it is getting there. I am taking a private a week this summer, so that will help a lot. I am going to play quite a few clay(har-tru)tournaments this summer but I need to get my 1hbh down or atleast not such a big liability like it is now.

I played against my typical hitting partner on hartru and my forehand was better then it ever has been but my 1hbh was brutal. If he hit short and it didn't jump much, I was fine. When he put more topspin and it landed deep it was trouble. I was trying to just take it early, but that tends to be very difficult with a 1hbh. It was really my only option though. Lets say I was far on my forehand and had to run to my bh side so I couldn't take it early, my only option was basically to slice it, but then when I did that he tore it apart.

Anyone have any suggestions on this? Really looking for an approach to this. It was very frustrating. Just because on the clay I tend to stay farther behind the baseline and can really hit my forehand hard, but when I am far back, the backhand just can't work good from that deep so I get out of my comfort zone.
A 1hbh works great on clay because of the slow surface. If you think the ball's bouncing higher on the clay than on hard courts, you're fooling yourself into believing a myth. It's been proven that the ball bounces about as high and sometimes lower on clay than on hard, but the ball won't zip past you as much. It's sort of like playing a deep slice on a hard court where the ball goes up, but not very long after the bounce. The 1hbh works just fine on clay and if you're having trouble, you should practice some more.

tonysk83
05-30-2006, 11:56 AM
Really I should practice more? Damn, wish I would of thought of that:rolleyes:

It doesn't matter if the ball doesn't bounce as high on clay, all I know is the ball was going higher to my backhand more often then on any other surface I have played. Any proof the ball doesn't bounce higher on clay?

Rickson
05-30-2006, 12:08 PM
Any proof the ball doesn't bounce higher on clay?
If you play on green clay, the bounce is slightly higher than on hard and red clay. If you play on red clay, the bounce is slightly lower than a hard court. Grass will obviously have the lowest bounce.

just out
05-30-2006, 12:30 PM
Really I should practice more? Damn, wish I would of thought of that:rolleyes:

It doesn't matter if the ball doesn't bounce as high on clay, all I know is the ball was going higher to my backhand more often then on any other surface I have played. Any proof the ball doesn't bounce higher on clay?

I played most of my tennis on Har-Tru and as I said because the ball sits up and the rebound angle is greater on clay (compared to a hard court)you are playing more high balls on clay especially if someone is hitting heavy topspin. That does not mean that a ball would actually bounce higher on clay vs. hard court.

NoBadMojo
05-30-2006, 01:06 PM
I also think the 1hbh is fine on clay, the ball sits up more (seems like more of a high bounce) and I think your timing is much different and that is probably your biggest adjustment. The ball really comes at you much faster on a hard surface, for me on the one handed backhand my timing is more consistent on a hard court because the bounce and location of the ball are more predictable. On clay it is more difficult to take balls on the rise because the bounce isn't always that consistent and you need to make more adjustments. Be patient and work on your footwork, it is much harder for most players to make small adjustments on the backhand side than on the forehand and that is why your forehand probably didn't suffer that much. Keep working at it though and you will adjust.

Love when these things get philosophical. I'm with you on this jackson vile. One of the reasons I started posting on this board was because I think many people come here looking for answers and expect that the only way they can/will improve is through the intervention of a pro or instructor (I run into many people who have that mindset). In my experience as a teaching pro and a player who was mostly self-taught I completely disagree. This may be true for some who have very little self-awareness and can not make corrections through observation and self-correction, but it certainly is not a requirement to reach a high level in tennis.

IMO this is also perpetuated by tennis pros who don't want to give up that repeat business.

hey welcome to the board. I dont post much in this section, but agree with your assessments. i hope you stick around..we need knowledgable posters like you. I too am a TP..been one off and on for many years and was also self taught (well i watched my favs on TV and learned from them). also play and teach on the dirt almost exclusively.
i agree there is more than one way to skin a cat and the goal of a TP should be to allow the lesson to use their natural tendencies as much as they can provided it falls within acceptable ranges. they will learn faster and enjoy it more and be less prone to injury. To me, the last thing you want to do is get too technical and to get everyone hitting like a clone of one another..thats fine in a clinic environment or if you get a lesson you only will see once or twice, but if you are helping to mold a player, they'll do better if they can work within their natural tendencies. If an eastern grip feels more comfortable to them than a SW that's cool..thats certainly within acceptable range. Be technical in your examination of what the lesson is doing in your mind, but come up w. the right simple non technical cues to get the lesson to do the right things within an acceptabe range. I think the TP's who babble forth all this tech lingo and jargon until the lessons' eyes glaze over arent very good TP's and many of them seem to do it more just to hear themselves talk.
To the OP, if you havent played much on HarTru it is normal to experience problems like you are. There is nothing wrong with using a sliced backhand as that can be effective and nasty if you can get it to skid and shoot through the court. I think the dirt/clay/hartru does expose weaknesses people have in a one handed backhand and in their groundstrokes in general, and that is a good thing.. example: if people dont step on their slice w. good technique they end up hitting floater/sitters on the clay. also dealing with high bounding balls with a one hander is damn tough even for accomplished players especially those using smaller headsized frames (just as federer when he plays Nadal).
The main diference to me is that on the HarTru, you must go get the ball because it tends to hit and grab whereas on a hardcourt, the ball will come to you a lot more and you can work off the incoming pace much easier..the dirt really does expose groundstroke weaknesses i feel.

Bungalo Bill
05-30-2006, 04:10 PM
I think the TP's who babble forth all this tech lingo and jargon until the lessons' eyes glaze over arent very good TP's and many of them seem to do it more just to hear themselves talk.

I dont know many tennis pro's that "babble". You make them seem like all they do is spill out nonsense to every player they meet. Coaches should be able to communicate in length, let the player absorb, and allow interaction to take place both with the ball and between each other. I think some coaches dont say enough and leave their students hanging. They give them smooth talk and never see their players improve.

A good coach is going to communicate with their students in the fashion they feel will improve the player - period. You shouldn't judge who shouldn't say what. Like you said, every coach is allowed to be DIFFERENT.

Every coach has their style and players will migrate to those they feel more comfortable with. One player may want a more technical review of things, and others can care less.

I think this is what makes human beings different and the opportunity to seek what they need.

I also think different mediums of communication also call for different styles. For example, one can read your post and notice you don't use paragraphs to make reading your posts simpler. Also, with the length of your post one could think you are babbling. :)

Here is one example that kind of flys in the face of your "coaching theory". I will take a more technical review and will take am more determined stance to improving a player. I will go to great lengths to make the player better than they were before and NEVER take for granted that I "said enough".

Originally Posted by Bungalo Bill
A good pro can also review how you take the racquet back. Habib, a poster here, offered his video for analysis. His hitting hand path was taking the wrong path, although he made it work for him. After pointing out how he should take the racquet back using a different path, this stalled his development which is natural when someone is learning or relearning something.


Habib's response: Temporarily stalled it. It's firing very nicely now. I know I keep promising updated videos but my schedule is making it a righteous pain in the ***. Well, hopefully soon. :-p

Are you gonna cry now?

NoBadMojo
05-30-2006, 04:21 PM
just out,
now you see why i rarely post in this forum

Bungalo Bill
05-30-2006, 04:31 PM
just out,
now you see why i rarely post in this forum

LOL, what you can't answer? Poor baby.

NoBadMojo
05-30-2006, 05:18 PM
just out,
now you see why i rarely post in this forum

Bungalo Bill
05-30-2006, 06:07 PM
just out,
now you see why i rarely post in this forum

So easy...lol

NoBadMojo
05-30-2006, 07:00 PM
I'm not interested in having discourse wth you. All you do is antagonize. I dont hang with people like you...you've got some serious problems, and have gotten even worse since the last time you apoligized to me. anyone can see. adios

Bungalo Bill
05-30-2006, 07:04 PM
I'm not interested in having discourse wth you. All you do is antagonize.

Awwww, and you don't. Poor baby.

I dont hang with people like you...you've got some serious problems, and have gotten even worse since the last time you apoligized to me. anyone can see. adios

Awwww, poor baby. I thought you weren't coming back? LOL

See ya later! Adios! Take a hike! lol

just out
06-01-2006, 07:45 AM
just out,
now you see why i rarely post in this forum

Sorry, I'm really not interested in getting between you and BB. I guess I'm probably on the "wrong" side (wisdom of BB and some of the other pros on this tips forum) but that's OK. I come at this from my own experience as a self-taught player and teacher and I'm not offended if someone thinks I'm wrong. I will not go out of my way to defend a "good" pro or what I think is good advice on this board either.

IMO this is all very subjective and we all judge (including BB), bottomline is hopefully we all love tennis and not just hearing ourselves talk and give advice. Though I have not benefitted a great deal as a player from the advice of teaching pros (probably more about the way I learn than about the pros) as a teaching pro I hope that I have been able to help others help themselves be better players.

Kevo
06-01-2006, 08:17 AM
Getting back to the OP and his trouble with 1hbh on clay...

First, let me state that I've never played on clay. The only clay courts we have around here are at country clubs, and I am not wealthy enough to pay the fee. Having said that, I have been playing around with my forehand grip a lot lately and can switch during a point from a continental to a full western. My wife hates the full western super-spin forehand because she can't hit it back. It jumps so high and so fast, and it lands so close to the baseline that she is at the fence when she tries to hit it. Sometimes it still jumps her racquet. The point of this is that spin that bounces high can be very hard to hit. My wife told me I should hit that shot more in matches because it's so effective, so I started hitting it against my doubles partner who I play singles against for practice. He can hit some pretty good spin too, so he tends to try and match my shots. The only effective way for me to hit those back, on either side, is to get to where the ball bounces and hit it right after the bounce. If I wait to long I either loop back a high one, forehand or backhand, or I have to try hitting the slice from the back fence. I can only be defensive at that point. So I've learned that when the ball is coming with heavy spin and high over the net, I just try to get to the place where it will bounce and then rip a shot to one corner or the other. Lots of times that shot is a winner because the flow of the rally changes a lot faster than the other player expects. If you have to be defensive though, hit a high topspin looper. This isn't that hard to do with a 1hbh, it just takes a little practice. It's basically like hitting a topspin lob. The follow through is very high. This ball will be almost impossible to volley if you hit it right, and it will go deep and give you time to recover. HTH

bribeiro
06-01-2006, 08:27 AM
A 1hbh works great on clay because of the slow surface. If you think the ball's bouncing higher on the clay than on hard courts, you're fooling yourself into believing a myth. It's been proven that the ball bounces about as high and sometimes lower on clay than on hard, but the ball won't zip past you as much. It's sort of like playing a deep slice on a hard court where the ball goes up, but not very long after the bounce. The 1hbh works just fine on clay and if you're having trouble, you should practice some more.

Got a link proving it doesn't bounce as much?

just out
06-01-2006, 10:11 AM
I played most of my tennis on Har-Tru and as I said because the ball sits up and the rebound angle is greater on clay (compared to a hard court)you are playing more high balls on clay especially if someone is hitting heavy topspin. That does not mean that a ball would actually bounce higher on clay vs. hard court.

Here's a link, http://www.tennisserver.com/set/set_02_10.html. This article shows the rebound height to be greater on clay vs. hard & grass. As I said in my other posts, this is not the same as saying a ball, when dropped on a clay surface would bounce higher, which is maybe what Rickson is talking about. After all what's important is what is going on when you're playing on Har-Tru and I agree you are facing more high balls vs. a hard court, but you are also facing less pace toward you after the bounce so there are a lot of adjustments that need to be made.