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limitup
05-29-2006, 12:49 PM
I posted this in the strings section but not getting much response so I figured I'd post it here too. Or if anyone knows of any "primers" on this subject I'd love to read more about it. I've searched and read tons of threads but haven't found anything that addresses my primary question...

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I'd self-rate myself at about the 3.5 level. I'm just starting to get serious about playing, and figured it's time to learn a bit more about strings. I need to make a switch because what I'm using now isn't working.

Recently the guy who has been stringing my racquets has been stringing it with Head RIP Perfect Control 16 string. Right now I'm hitting with a Head FP radical, and with my borderline SW/Western grip and topspin I am busting these strings like crazy. I busted strings on 2 of my racquets today - both had *maybe* 10 hours or less of hitting on them. Both of them I busted a main right in the middle of the stringbed.

So my first question is, at what point does it make sense to expirement with different strings? At the 3.5ish level, am I not good enough to notice or take advantage of any differences? I'm actually thinking of getting a machine and learning to string my own racquets so I can expirement with different strings, tensions, etc. more easily.

I don't want to go with 15s, so I'm thinking I need something more durable. Someone recommended the Prince Synthetic Gut Duraflex ... but will it feel a lot different to a player like me? With so many different strings, how do I know which to expirement with or what direction to go? I'm even considering the Prince Problend with duraflex crosses and kevlar mains. But how does it play?? I've read reviews of all these strings but they all seem so mixed/contradictory.

This head fp radical doesn't even have an open string pattern, and I'm thinking of switching to a babolat APD with a more open string pattern so I'm extra worried I will just keep busting strings. I'm mostly a baseliner though ...

AndyP
05-29-2006, 12:51 PM
I'm in no way a string expert, but I find prince synthetic 16g works just fine for me. I break a lot of strings (in comparison to my other teammates), but these provide me with decent durability.

limitup
05-29-2006, 12:53 PM
I have that exact string on my other 2 racquets, freshly strung. We'll see how long they last this week ...


*edit* Oops I was wrong. It's Wilson Extreme syn gut 16

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 01:05 PM
I posted this in the strings section but not getting much response so I figured I'd post it here too. Or if anyone knows of any "primers" on this subject I'd love to read more about it. I've searched and read tons of threads but haven't found anything that addresses my primary question...


Maybe it is you that no one wants to respond to? :) Kidding you.

Anyway, when a player is developing their technique, style of play, and preferences, racquet technology and string technology can influence the feel a player wants out of his or her equipment. But it does not replace your technique and hitting the ball properly.

I for instance can not play with "normal" strings. I will break them in a day. I hit hard, with lots of spin, and will go through strings like butter.

Therefore, I need to choose a string that is durable but doesn't lose too much feel.

Currently, I am playing with the Forten Aramid Gear. I like the string because it lasts forever. Many times I have to cut out the string. It also offers me the "dead feel" I like when hitting through the ball which allows me to feel the shot in a way I like to feel it.

Lately, I have been playing with the Luxilon Big Banger Ace and am testing the durability, the tension maintenance, the feel, etc...I am leaning now to switch to the string for various reasons.

So strings do matter, but don't look for your strings or your racquet to revolutionize your technique.

lucky leprechaun
05-29-2006, 01:15 PM
I can kind of picture the way you hit. All the fellas I know that pop strings like you have got kevlar in their racquet. I recommend ashaway. I went through a kevlar phase, and this was the only one I liked it felt the least harsh but still retains the same dead feel and durability that people like. Forten's okay, but is harsher than ashaway. I've tried using regular nylon to synthetic to gut in the crosses and it didn't make a huge difference to me either way, so I ended up putting the cheapest stuff I had on hand in the crosses.

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 01:18 PM
I can kind of picture the way you hit. All the fellas I know that pop strings like you have got kevlar in their racquet. I recommend ashaway. I went through a kevlar phase, and this was the only one I liked it felt the least harsh but still retains the same dead feel and durability that people like. Forten's okay, but is harsher than ashaway. I've tried using regular nylon to synthetic to gut in the crosses and it didn't make a huge difference to me either way, so I ended up putting the cheapest stuff I had on hand in the crosses.

It is all what a player likes. It is only "better" to the one liking the string.

I hated Ashway, strings lost tension, and broke all the time. Ashway was a ripoff.

Do you see? lol

Court_Jester
05-29-2006, 01:38 PM
So my first question is, at what point does it make sense to expirement with different strings? At the 3.5ish level, am I not good enough to notice or take advantage of any differences? I'm actually thinking of getting a machine and learning to string my own racquets so I can expirement with different strings, tensions, etc. more easily.
It's never too early nor too late to experiment on string combinations. At your level, you should be able to sense any significant tension loss or "feel" in your racquet. Since you're a frequent string breaker, a stringing machine is definitely in your cards down the road.

I don't want to go with 15s, so I'm thinking I need something more durable. Someone recommended the Prince Synthetic Gut Duraflex ... but will it feel a lot different to a player like me?
There's a good chance that the Duraflex may feel differently from what the reviews indicate so again, try it out yourself.

With so many different strings, how do I know which to expirement with or what direction to go? I'm even considering the Prince Problend with duraflex crosses and kevlar mains. But how does it play?? I've read reviews of all these strings but they all seem so mixed/contradictory.
Start with a durable strings like Duraflex and Rip Control then move on to polys then hybrids. Use the reviews as a guide, not as a final deciding factor in selecting the strings.

This head fp radical doesn't even have an open string pattern, and I'm thinking of switching to a babolat APD with a more open string pattern so I'm extra worried I will just keep busting strings. I'm mostly a baseliner though ...
Don't change your racquets until you have thoroughly tested several string combinations. Changing racquet alone will not solve your dilemma. Even if you decide to change sticks, you still have to go through a series of string combinations to find the right one for you.

.

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 02:32 PM
It's never too early nor too late to experiment on string combinations. At your level, you should be able to sense any significant tension loss or "feel" in your racquet. Since you're a frequent string breaker, a stringing machine is definitely in your cards down the road.


There's a good chance that the Duraflex may feel differently from what the reviews indicate so again, try it out yourself.


Start with a durable strings like Duraflex and Rip Control then move on to polys then hybrids. Use the reviews as a guide, not as a final deciding factor in selecting the strings.


Don't change your racquets until you have thoroughly tested several string combinations. Changing racquet alone will not solve your dilemma. Even if you decide to change sticks, you still have to go through a series of string combinations to find the right one for you.

.

This was an intelligent easy to follow thread. Thanks for talking the time to write this. Very well done.

When it comes to a players craft, a player needs to try different combinations of things. String tension, string type, racquet flex, racquet head size, etc... all influence what a player will like when they hit the ball.

Very well done!

35ft6
05-29-2006, 02:54 PM
So my first question is, at what point does it make sense to expirement with different strings? At the 3.5ish level, am I not good enough to notice or take advantage of any differences? I'm actually thinking of getting a machine and learning to string my own racquets so I can expirement with different strings, tensions, etc. more easily. If you plan on playing for a while, you should definitely drop $135 to buy a stringer. I highly recommend this one (http://www.atssports.com/tennis.cfm?ProdID=274&secondary=31). It's very solid. I've had mine for 6 years and the tools are still in perfect condition.This head fp radical doesn't even have an open string pattern, and I'm thinking of switching to a babolat APD with a more open string pattern so I'm extra worried I will just keep busting strings. I'm mostly a baseliner though ... You might want to try a Luxillon string at 17 gauge for your Head racket. I'm not sure what to say about the crosses, currently I'm using up the rest of my Prince Nylons as crosses. I'd like to try some Technifibre for crosses when the Nylon runs out.

Yeah, strings and lead tape can make your racket feel like a completely different stick. There's a bit of a feedback loop going on, your technique will dictate the kind of equipment and specifications you'll need, but, also, the equipment you use will influence your technique. This is easy to see if you gave one kid a wood racket to begin with, and another a Babolat racket, you'd see that their strokes after 4 years would be radically different from the others.

Just realize that like BB said, it's mostly about technique. I've heard of a drill that Nick B does with some students where they're forced to switch rackets on every shot, somebody hands them a different racket after each shot. It's to reinforce the fact that mostly it's about the player, not the racket. So don't fall into a neverending quest for the perfect combination of string, gauge, racket, weight, grip, tension, shoes, etc, always looking for the magic bullet. It's like dieting, there's a thousand gimmicks out there that claim to make you lose weight, and any one of them can work, but at the end of the day it's simply about eating less, more sensibly. Likewise, at the end of the day it's about improving your technique, not about your equipment. (but equipment IS important! just don't become a tennis hypochondriac!)

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 03:18 PM
If you plan on playing for a while, you should definitely drop $135 to buy a stringer. I highly recommend this one (http://www.atssports.com/tennis.cfm?ProdID=274&secondary=31). It's very solid.

Great price, is there one that compares or have you found that this is the best in its class? Do you know much about LaserFibre stringers?

35ft6
05-29-2006, 03:27 PM
Great price, is there one that compares or have you found that this is the best in its class? Do you know much about LaserFibre stringers? I don't know anything about Laserfibre stringers. I've strung once with Klippermate, and I used to have an old, crank model that was about the same price as the ATS, but way inferior.

I guess I can't say that it's the best of its class, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was. I's really solid. It "feels" well made.

The minor complaints I have is that sometimes you have to clean the part that pulls the string to give it the tension. Some strings seem to be greased up a bit and that grease will compromise the gripping motion. On that note, I'm not sure if tension grip part can hold 17 gauge string. Certain slipperier 16 gauge strings seems to give it a problem. You can get around this by wrapping it around the mechanism twice, but it's still annoying.

And those are my very minor complaints. Otherwise, this stringer is solid. When I used to string for my teammates on away trips, some commented that their racket felt better than it did when the professional we paid too much money to did them. I can't comment on how accurate the tension is, for all I know it felt "better" to them because the tension was off.

I can string my racket in 20 minutes. I cut a lot of corners on my own rackets. If I were doing somebody else's, it would probably be more like 30 to 35 minutes.

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 04:03 PM
I don't know anything about Laserfibre stringers. I've strung once with Klippermate, and I used to have an old, crank model that was about the same price as the ATS, but way inferior.

I guess I can't say that it's the best of its class, but I wouldn't be surprised if it was. I's really solid. It "feels" well made.

The minor complaints I have is that sometimes you have to clean the part that pulls the string to give it the tension. Some strings seem to be greased up a bit and that grease will compromise the gripping motion. On that note, I'm not sure if tension grip part can hold 17 gauge string. Certain slipperier 16 gauge strings seems to give it a problem. You can get around this by wrapping it around the mechanism twice, but it's still annoying.

And those are my very minor complaints. Otherwise, this stringer is solid. When I used to string for my teammates on away trips, some commented that their racket felt better than it did when the professional we paid too much money to did them. I can't comment on how accurate the tension is, for all I know it felt "better" to them because the tension was off.

I can string my racket in 20 minutes. I cut a lot of corners on my own rackets. If I were doing somebody else's, it would probably be more like 30 to 35 minutes.

Would Big Banger Ace give it a problem?

papa
05-29-2006, 04:24 PM
Would Big Banger Ace give it a problem?

If you break a lot of strings, try using this stuff. Plays well and lasts - think one could hit rocks with this stuff.

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 04:25 PM
If you break a lot of strings, try using this stuff. Plays well and lasts - think one could hit rocks with this stuff.

What I like most about the strings is the tension maintenance it has and the fact they never move!

35ft6
05-29-2006, 04:57 PM
Would Big Banger Ace give it a problem? You should be able to string it no problem by wrapping it around twice. The strings that have given my machine the most problems are really stiff mono-filament strings because the tension part can't "bite" into it. Stuff like Big Banger, which is more like tiny rope, my machine can "bite" into. But 18 gauge is something I haven't tried yet. I would ask somebody who knows for sure. I wouldn't trust the people at ATS. It seems like even if they don't know what you're talking about, they'll say whatever they think you want to hear in order to buy their stuff.

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 05:04 PM
You should be able to string it no problem by wrapping it around twice. The strings that have given my machine the most problems are really stiff mono-filament strings because the tension part can't "bite" into it. Stuff like Big Banger, which is more like tiny rope, my machine can "bite" into. But 18 gauge is something I haven't tried yet. I would ask somebody who knows for sure. I wouldn't trust the people at ATS. It seems like even if they don't know what you're talking about, they'll say whatever they think you want to hear in order to buy their stuff.

Very good, you know your stuff! Gracias!

limitup
05-29-2006, 05:38 PM
Thanks to all, much appreciated. I'm going to look into getting a stringer for sure.

BB - that Big Banger Ace you're using is 18 string? And it's strong enough for you??

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 05:45 PM
Thanks to all, much appreciated. I'm going to look into getting a stringer for sure.

BB - that Big Banger Ace you're using is 18 string? And it's strong enough for you??

I used it because a friend of mine had it on his racquet (I dont like trying new things when I find something that works). But when I played with it, I liked it a lot. I especially like that it didnt move no matter how much spin I tried to hit with. I mean I hit my twist serves as hard as I could, my forehand topspin as much as I could, and the strings didnt budge one bit.

I dont think it was 18 though, I am pretty sure the string was 16. I am going to order some Ace for my Volkls as I think I am coming to the end of the Babolot racquets.

Try em' and see how it works then fill us in. Good to see you still posting.

limitup
05-29-2006, 05:48 PM
Ah. I just looked on TW real quick and it looks like they only have the 18. I assumed that's the only size it came in.

They recommend tensions 10% less than normal - do most people find that to be a good starting point?

Time to expirement ...

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 05:59 PM
Ah. I just looked on TW real quick and it looks like they only have the 18. I assumed that's the only size it came in.

They recommend tensions 10% less than normal - do most people find that to be a good starting point?

Time to expirement ...

There is another place...hint hint

10ispro
05-29-2006, 06:05 PM
Currently, I am playing with the Forten Aramid Gear. I like the string because it lasts forever. Many times I have to cut out the string. It also offers me the "dead feel" I like when hitting through the ball which allows me to feel the shot in a way I like to feel it.

Lately, I have been playing with the Luxilon Big Banger Ace and am testing the durability, the tension maintenance, the feel, etc...I am leaning now to switch to the string for various reasons.
.

whew scary that we have similiarities....:mrgreen:

i started using Forten in College and really havent used much else since then. When I had a brief stint with Wilson last year they gave me a ton of Enduro Mono,Stamina and Sensation to try b/c alot of companies are trying to get away from Kevlar strings.
I hated the Enduro Mono and in general I am not a big fan of polys. The Stamina was Ok, but I have never been a huge fan of Synthetics and teh sensation was too soft of a feeling string for me to enjoy, plus I broke it in about 30minutes.

I have a guy I hit with who had an IMG contract when he was younger so he has a ton of Big Banger which he also hates so he gave it to me to try. After a Few times, I just never really liked it, It was lively and lost tension faster IMO than my kevlars.SO I still have a ton of sets in my drawer that I save for some members that request it occassionally.

So again I went back to the tried and true forten. I use Aramid Gear occassionally but prefer Thin Blend and recently started using the Ultra Thin Blend. The only downside of the Ultra Thin is lots of string movement. I like the dead feel of kevlars and basically like to feel like I am hitting with a 2x4.:cool:

limitup
05-29-2006, 06:15 PM
It appears the Big Banger Ace only comes in 18. I googled it and can't find any mention whatsoever of that string in 16. Several sources said things like "The Luxilon Big Banger Ace however is 18 gauge which means it's significantly thinner than 16 gauge, which is the standard."

BB, just out of curiosity, are you mainly interested in the Ace because it seems to retain tension so well? Otherwise I figure the ALU-Power would be more up your alley ...

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 07:37 PM
It appears the Big Banger Ace only comes in 18. I googled it and can't find any mention whatsoever of that string in 16. Several sources said things like "The Luxilon Big Banger Ace however is 18 gauge which means it's significantly thinner than 16 gauge, which is the standard."

BB, just out of curiosity, are you mainly interested in the Ace because it seems to retain tension so well? Otherwise I figure the ALU-Power would be more up your alley ...

Maybe it wasn't the Ace. It might have been the original, try checking into that version. I can't believe the string I saw was 18 guage.

Bungalo Bill
05-29-2006, 07:40 PM
whew scary that we have similiarities....:mrgreen:

i started using Forten in College and really havent used much else since then. When I had a brief stint with Wilson last year they gave me a ton of Enduro Mono,Stamina and Sensation to try b/c alot of companies are trying to get away from Kevlar strings.
I hated the Enduro Mono and in general I am not a big fan of polys. The Stamina was Ok, but I have never been a huge fan of Synthetics and teh sensation was too soft of a feeling string for me to enjoy, plus I broke it in about 30minutes.

I have a guy I hit with who had an IMG contract when he was younger so he has a ton of Big Banger which he also hates so he gave it to me to try. After a Few times, I just never really liked it, It was lively and lost tension faster IMO than my kevlars.SO I still have a ton of sets in my drawer that I save for some members that request it occassionally.

So again I went back to the tried and true forten. I use Aramid Gear occassionally but prefer Thin Blend and recently started using the Ultra Thin Blend. The only downside of the Ultra Thin is lots of string movement. I like the dead feel of kevlars and basically like to feel like I am hitting with a 2x4.:cool:

I like Fortens string. I also have the feeling the Ace is too lively. I dont like that at all. This is scary!

I used to use the thin blend, maybe I should try that once again. I did like it, but did break em' because of the movement. I was always messing with them! :)

10ispro
05-29-2006, 08:03 PM
I like Fortens string. I also have the feeling the Ace is too lively. I dont like that at all. This is scary!

I used to use the thin blend, maybe I should try that once again. I did like it, but did break em' because of the movement. I was always messing with them! :)

I love thin blend. Better durability than any Synthetic. Better playability b/c of the thinner gauge string but still gives that relaible stiff feel of kevlar. thicker Kevlar like 16awg always seems to go soft, thin blend seems to stay stiffer longer, its like kevlar on viagra:cool:
or at least breaks before it goes soft. The ultra thin is also very cool string, worth looking into with great playability but moves around alot after a few games.
But unlike softer strings and many polys, they feel the same at anytime i pull a racquet out of my bag. With many Polys, a Freshly strung racquet that may not have been used for a week or more felt way off.
and I cant stand not having the right "feel" when I hit, granted that feel i look for is equivalent to most people like swinging a piece of lumber:mrgreen:

travlerajm
05-29-2006, 08:10 PM
I love thin blend. Better durability than any Synthetic. Better playability b/c of the thinner gauge string but still gives that relaible stiff feel of kevlar. thicker Kevlar like 16awg always seems to go soft, thin blend seems to stay stiffer longer, its like kevlar on viagra:cool:
or at least breaks before it goes soft. The ultra thin is also very cool string, worth looking into with great playability but moves around alot after a few games.
But unlike softer strings and many polys, they feel the same at anytime i pull a racquet out of my bag. With many Polys, a Freshly strung racquet that may not have been used for a week or more felt way off.
and I cant stand not having the right "feel" when I hit, granted that feel i look for is equivalent to most people like swinging a piece of lumber:mrgreen:

I like the feel of 16g kevlar hybrid when it goes soft. It seems like it reaches a steady state and stays that way for a long, long time.

drakulie
05-29-2006, 08:12 PM
I like the string because it lasts forever. Many times I have to cut out the string. It also offers me the "dead feel" I like when hitting through the ball which allows me to feel the shot in a way I like to feel it.


Same for me. I like the "dead feel" or "wood-like" feel kevlar gives the racquet. I use 16 gauge kevlar in the mains with synthetics in the crosses strung at about 68-70 lbs.

It took me about a year and and lots of "hit and miss" before I found a string/tension combination I liked.

limitup
05-29-2006, 09:38 PM
I dont think it was 18 though, I am pretty sure the string was 16. I am going to order some Ace for my Volkls as I think I am coming to the end of the Babolot racquets ...

Maybe it wasn't the Ace. It might have been the original, try checking into that version. I can't believe the string I saw was 18 guage.

The Ace only comes in 18. And based on the ratings they give their strings, I would say it's definitely not the Ace with a comfort level of 10 LOL. Here's the ratings off their website at protennis.us ...

Ace - Durability 7, Power 8, Control 9, Comfort 10
Original - Durability 10, Power 9, Control 8, Comfort 7

The Original has the highest durability for sure. Original and Ace are basically opposites.

The Alu Touch hybrid looks interesting too.

AngeloDS
05-30-2006, 12:28 AM
Does string make a difference? Yes, it makes a difference. Moreso, the tension makes a difference since you can feel that directly.

The problem a lot of people have is they go with some string that has superb durability. But it loses tension and then their shots tend to lack pop and lack certain things compared to their fresh string job. I'd rather have my strings break than lose tension in a match.

But the different type of strings do have different feels to them. Luxilon TiMO is a different beast from other strings and has certain qualities to it. So do most gamma strings.

Experiment and find something you like then stick with that for awhile so you can get used to it and good with it. If you're really used to it, you can tell the difference if there's a loss of tension, different feel to it or if it lacks pop and can get that fixed immediately.

Bungalo Bill
05-30-2006, 12:34 AM
The Ace only comes in 18. And based on the ratings they give their strings, I would say it's definitely not the Ace with a comfort level of 10 LOL. Here's the ratings off their website at protennis.us ...

Ace - Durability 7, Power 8, Control 9, Comfort 10
Original - Durability 10, Power 9, Control 8, Comfort 7

The Original has the highest durability for sure. Original and Ace are basically opposites.

The Alu Touch hybrid looks interesting too.

Limitup, I have seen these "ratings" for years. When I used to play with Blue Star string, they would have their ratings. The ratings are very subjective.

You can see this by DS's response about durable strings. I love durable strings as it tempers the power I can put into the ball. I am not a "feel" player necessarily so using the string I have suits me well.

You really have to find out what is most important to you about string. Mine was durability. Then get some different types within your values and test it out.

You need to be the judge of what you like. Just sit down and decide what is important to you. Is it price point? Is it durability? Is it softness? Do you like a thin gauge? Etc....

travlerajm
05-30-2006, 12:39 AM
Limitup, I have seen these "ratings" for years. When I used to play with Blue Star string, they would have their ratings. The ratings are very subjective.

You can see this by DS's response about durable strings. I love durable strings as it tempers the power I can put into the ball. I am not a "feel" player necessarily so using the string I have suits me well.

You really have to find out what is most important to you about string. Mine was durability. Then get some different types within your values and test it out.

You need to be the judge of what you like. Just sit down and decide what is important to you. Is it price point? Is it durability? Is it softness? Do you like a thin gauge? Etc....

I'm with BB on this one. The durability of Kevlar hybrids (esp. 16g) trumps all other factors for me, since it saves me a bundle of money.

kevhen
05-30-2006, 07:02 AM
Strings can make a difference but not very much. I think your racquet weight and balance have much more effect on your shots, but string that is strung too high or too low can affect your game and even cause elbow injuries.

I have used Luxilon BB string for 3 years now and love it and it's finally becoming more mainstream. I started with the 18 gauge Ace string and it would last me 2 months instead of 1 month for normal string. It doesn't move and holds its tension for life unlike regular string that loses tension over time.

I switched to Luxilon BB Rough Alu (16 gauge) 2 years ago, and this stuff is even better as it lasts me about 6 months, has more bite for more spin, holds its tension, and the strings stay in place. You do need to string Luxilon string like 5-10 pounds lower so I string around 50-55 pounds, otherwise it can be hard on the elbow.

String is important but not the most important part of playing great tennis. I have never blamed any of my losses on my string!

35ft6
05-30-2006, 08:14 AM
Ah. I just looked on TW real quick and it looks like they only have the 18. I assumed that's the only size it came in.

They recommend tensions 10% less than normal - do most people find that to be a good starting point? I thought I read 10 lbs. less, but maybe you're right. I've been stringing my rackets even less than 10 lbs less than pre-Big Banger, but since I've added lead tape to my racket, I think I need to go back up about 3 to 5 lbs.

limitup
05-30-2006, 12:01 PM
I switched to Luxilon BB Rough Alu (16 gauge) 2 years ago, and this stuff is even better as it lasts me about 6 months

I can't imagine strings lasting 6 months, that's nuts. How often do you play?

Price is not really a factor. I would say durability is pretty important because it's a PITA to keep breaking strings. Even if I get my own machine, I'm pretty busy and wouldn't look forward to spending 2-3 hours a week stringing my racquets. I just don't have that kind of time to do it even if I wanted. I'm a baseline bomber for now so I guess I'll lean more towards durability and go from there. Control is nice but I doubt I'm good enough to take advantage of "control" strings anyway.

kevhen
05-30-2006, 12:11 PM
BB Rough ALU last 6 months hitting 3 times a week for 2-3 hours each session. hitting 100+mph serves but fairly flat groundstrokes. I usually break strings on the serve. With heavier topspin on the groundstrokes, you might break them sooner. Other string only lasts me about 1 month or less. This string holds it's tension well so you can go 6 months with it.

limitup
05-30-2006, 12:18 PM
Sure would be nice to go from restringing once a week to even once every few months. That would be REALLY nice!

Interesting on the different strings. They actually rate the Alu Power at the lowest durability with the BB original having max durability.

Ok enough talk, time for me to get busy. Thanks to all!

Bungalo Bill
05-30-2006, 05:01 PM
BB Rough ALU last 6 months hitting 3 times a week for 2-3 hours each session. hitting 100+mph serves but fairly flat groundstrokes. I usually break strings on the serve. With heavier topspin on the groundstrokes, you might break them sooner. Other string only lasts me about 1 month or less. This string holds it's tension well so you can go 6 months with it.

Kev,

You shouldn't keep your strings in that long. Cut em' out after about a month because they really lose their flavor.

You can notice this if you have 6 month old strings and then hit with a fresh string job. Its like WOW!