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iconoclast
05-29-2006, 06:28 PM
I don't know if you have ever thought, especially after loosing a game and thinking about what went wrong, that the problem was you played as being constantly rushed.

That's exactly how I feel today. My oponent made me felt out of my normal rhythm, and before I realized I was taking that into every part of my game.

Any advice on how to avoid that?

golden chicken
05-29-2006, 06:39 PM
work on your footwork and court positioning. also try to hit deep, which will force your opponent to hit from behind the baseline, which gives him less angles and you more time.

travlerajm
05-29-2006, 06:44 PM
I found that my game improved by a whole level once I made a conscious effort to always set up my feet and step into the ball. It means that you need to have more of a sense of urgency to get to every ball in a hurry, even when it seems like you have plenty of time.

When pulled wide to the forehand side, most people hit open stance forehands by putting the breaks on with the right foot as the last step before hitting the ball. If you get to the wide forehand a split second earlier, you can put the breaks on with your right foot, then step forward into the shot with your left foot. This will give you both added power and increased consistency, since your hitting zone will be longer. And since your shot will have more mustard on it, it will give your opponent less time to set up, so that he will be less able to rush your next shot.

Disciplined footwork is an underrated way to improve fast, since it doesn't involve a change to your stroke mechanics. Remember that a running forehand is difficult; but running into position and then hitting a stationary forehand is much easier, especially once you make it a habit!

iconoclast
05-29-2006, 07:22 PM
Thanks! Both of you are exactly right. Footwork is key. Don't you feel though that as soon as you're not completely focused in the game your footwork gets a bit lazy?

Travlerajm, when you say that you make the effort to set up your fet and then step into the ball you mean that you try to anticipate where you'd normally make contact with the ball and then move forward hitting while you still have some inertia?

Another thing that both of you agree is hitting deep. I wasn't doing it today, at least not consistently. And before I knew this guy was camping at the net...

jackson vile
05-29-2006, 08:22 PM
I don't know if you have ever thought, especially after loosing a game and thinking about what went wrong, that the problem was you played as being constantly rushed.

That's exactly how I feel today. My oponent made me felt out of my normal rhythm, and before I realized I was taking that into every part of my game.

Any advice on how to avoid that?


The advice I give is to watch you oponent better and to better anticipate what they are going to do and to get there in position sooner.

Look at Roger, he is almost always ready and set up. He pays good atention to the body motion and their eyes, also experience helps with this a lot in knowing what the possbile shots are, and then knowing that player so that you know what they will do in those situations.


Also you can stay further back from the basline, or to hit deaper in the oponents base line to push them back.

grizzly4life
05-29-2006, 09:30 PM
excellent replies....

and i think this is where speed and conditioning really come in...

sure, i'm in good enough to shape to play fairly long points, but am i in good enough shape to have excellent footwork on all shots, or do i eventually get lazy and hit from poor foot position?

also, it really helps to practice/hit for an hour and say i'm really going to focus on my footwork every shot (even the easy ones). and it might take some getting used to. but as i said in another thread, practice is the time to focus on footwork every single shot (or at least for half an hour and work up from there) as opposed to having too many swing thoughts as you play.

i might add (and it was mentioned by someone else) is to really focus on anticipation. are you watching your opponent's racquet path and his feet? apparently top players have absolutely amazing anticipation and i think it's something we can all work on even we aren't athletic (sort of like anyone can get good at 5-10 foot putts in golf if they put in the practice. 300 yard drives are another story).

iconoclast
05-30-2006, 12:18 PM
Excellent advice from all of you!

Thanks.

I am going to try to put it into practice.