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View Full Version : Pros with Bad Form = Constant Injuries


HollerOne5
05-30-2006, 10:33 PM
I'm sick of always hearing about certain players that are always injured, but this is directly related to bad form on their shots, especially with these upper-body injuries.

For instance, should Maria Sharapova be CONSTANTLY injured at age 18 or 19? Her pectoral strain that prevented her from playing a full schedule last year, is most likely related to the fact that her forehand technique is so incredibly bad, its no wonder. Anyone see her constant wrap around the head technique even on high balls? That is so bad on the shoulders and such when you are hitting with that much pace consistently.

On the flip side, its so rare to hear that Roger Federer is injured. Couldn't this be due to the fact that his form is pretty much textbook perfect? Of course, he rolled an ankle or two, but that isn't related to technique.

I'm sorry, I just find this crap annoying. The players complain about how the schedule is too long and thats why they cant play without being injured, but I think if they really looked at some of their form, they would realize the root of the problem.

siber222000
05-30-2006, 10:55 PM
........im guessing if ur playing at the pro level, it'll be often to get a injuries because think about ur returning serves that are over 120 mph and returning the forehands / backhands that are over 80 mph, and what makes you think they have a bad form? everyone has their unique form that are suited for them. it's not like they want a injury, and since they are at the pro level, i dont think u should worry about them.


im wondering y r u getting annoying by pros getting injuries, ur not the one getting them, so y r u getting annoyed?

superman1
05-30-2006, 11:21 PM
Sharapova actually separated a rib, or something like that. They can get some bad injuries. And even spraining an ankle, which we all do, is a lot more serious for a pro since they have no other talents other than running around hitting balls and entertaining us. If they fracture the ankle, game over.

siber222000
05-30-2006, 11:24 PM
Sharapova actually separated a rib, or something like that. They can get some bad injuries. And even spraining an ankle, which we all do, is a lot more serious for a pro since they have no other talents other than running around hitting balls and entertaining us. If they fracture the ankle, game over.
u mean they only have a talent to run and hit the ball for money (entertaining us is kinda... offensive hah)

HollerOne5
05-30-2006, 11:32 PM
Its annoying as a spectator, yes.

You expect everyone to show up to tournaments and give everyone else in the draw a good matchup. And what about the locals who buy tickets to these tournaments because their favorite player is entered, just to find out they have withdrawn because of injury. I think thats a fair reason to become annoyed, let alone the fact a lot of injuries are made up as excuses by players to avoid playing tournaments or matches for one reason or another. i.e. - Serena Williams currently

siber222000
05-30-2006, 11:41 PM
Its annoying as a spectator, yes.

You expect everyone to show up to tournaments and give everyone else in the draw a good matchup. And what about the locals who buy tickets to these tournaments because their favorite player is entered, just to find out they have withdrawn because of injury. I think thats a fair reason to become annoyed, let alone the fact a lot of injuries are made up as excuses by players to avoid playing tournaments or matches for one reason or another. i.e. - Serena Williams currently

roddick tried his best (he got couple aces) and also fans knew about he might be retiring before match or during match since they knew about his ankle, so i dont think u should complain about his performance today. injuries are not excuses, they are just a basic truth, players know if they do not play a lot of tournaments and wins them, their rankings will go down so what makes you think that they are purposely avoiding match using a injury as excuse?

HyperHorse
05-30-2006, 11:47 PM
The tournament schedule is TOO LONG.
geez, give these guys a 2 month break.

c10
05-31-2006, 12:00 AM
I'm sick of always hearing about certain players that are always injured, but this is directly related to bad form on their shots,

Do you think tennis strokes were designed for preventing injuries?? They were designed for making them more powerfull, etc using the body effectively.

Injuries on proffesionals are caused mainly for playing too much not for bad strokes. All types of strokes are bad, any kind of shock is "bad" for the body.

If you want to stop hearing about tennis injuries we have to bring back the slow tennis, with flat strokes, etc.

Many players get injuries because they are in better shape, or they have a better natural condition, and other players just get injuries because of there playing style. Not all players use the same style, but that does not mean they have bad form.

hoosierbr
05-31-2006, 01:44 AM
The last couple of years Federer has gotten injured during the indoor season and has had to miss the Masters events in Madrid and Paris. His TMC participation was in some doubt in 2004 and very much in doubt last year. Like Sharapova he's gotten injured while training. Happens to many players - Courier and Chang lost some of their zeal and more recently Henin-Hardenne got burned out quickly in her bid to get stronger.

LowProfile
05-31-2006, 12:50 PM
Come on. Constant injuries doesn't mean that you have bad form. The big guys are more likely to be injured. Take Flipper or Dent for instance. Joachim Johannson. And then take the perfect form of Tommy Haas or Marat Safin. Those guys struggle with injuries all the time too.

!Tym
05-31-2006, 01:31 PM
...and, sometimes? Sometimes, it's just luck and the workings of random selection. You've got guys who dedicate their whole lives and year-round to a sport. It's inevitable that a certain percentage are going to fall victim to injuries. I mean Rios and Krajicek had about as economical a strokes as you can get yet their bodies broke down repeatedly.

I don't think it much less to do with "form" as much as it does simle luck and genetics. I don't think it's that far-fetched or hard to see how shoulder, kness, wrists, etc. eventually wear out when you play a sport at such a high level for so many years as these guys do, regardless of what style or technique you have.

tennissavy
05-31-2006, 01:59 PM
I'm sick of always hearing about certain players that are always injured, but this is directly related to bad form on their shots, especially with these upper-body injuries.

For instance, should Maria Sharapova be CONSTANTLY injured at age 18 or 19? Her pectoral strain that prevented her from playing a full schedule last year, is most likely related to the fact that her forehand technique is so incredibly bad, its no wonder. Anyone see her constant wrap around the head technique even on high balls? That is so bad on the shoulders and such when you are hitting with that much pace consistently.

On the flip side, its so rare to hear that Roger Federer is injured. Couldn't this be due to the fact that his form is pretty much textbook perfect? Of course, he rolled an ankle or two, but that isn't related to technique.

I'm sorry, I just find this crap annoying. The players complain about how the schedule is too long and thats why they cant play without being injured, but I think if they really looked at some of their form, they would realize the root of the problem.

How can you criticize Sharapova for having bad technique on her forehand??? She was taught by Lansdorp, who taught Davenport and Austin among other great champions. The commentators have praised her technique back when she won wimbledon and now. So you think it is bad form to follow through over one's head? No one does it more than Nadal but you're not picking on him. Maria does it maybe two out of 10 times. Nadal does it all the time and he isn't injured in the shoulder area.

siber222000
05-31-2006, 02:16 PM
How can you criticize Sharapova for having bad technique on her forehand??? She was taught by Lansdorp, who taught Davenport and Austin among other great champions. The commentators have praised her technique back when she won wimbledon and now. So you think it is bad form to follow through over one's head? No one does it more than Nadal but you're not picking on him. Maria does it maybe two out of 10 times. Nadal does it all the time and he isn't injured in the shoulder area.
well said

HollerOne5
05-31-2006, 02:25 PM
How can you criticize Sharapova for having bad technique on her forehand??? She was taught by Lansdorp, who taught Davenport and Austin among other great champions. The commentators have praised her technique back when she won wimbledon and now. So you think it is bad form to follow through over one's head? No one does it more than Nadal but you're not picking on him. Maria does it maybe two out of 10 times. Nadal does it all the time and he isn't injured in the shoulder area.

Actually, Sharapova does have poor forehand form. Just because Lansdorp taught Davenport and Austin, doesn't mean that he was the first coach to ever get a hold of Sharapova and train her on her forehand. Sharapova worked with Lansdorp after she spent years in Russia AND at the Bolleteri academy, so I don't see how you can conclude she has good form just based on who her coach has been - idiotic.

And, I do believe it is ok to wrap around the forehand at certain times, espcially on the run. This creates a lot more power when you don't have a lot of time to set up and/or put your bodyweight into your shots. I'm not a fool and I know what I'm talking about....Sharapova takes her forehands all the way around her whole body on silly shots, like easy put-aways at the net, swinging volleys, and times where she has an immense amount of time to set up properly for her shot. I'm telling you I think that kind of technique puts too much strain on her upper body instead of relying on all her forward momentum and body weight to generate power.

I didn't mean for this discussion to turn into a debate on Sharapova's form, but I think you'll have to agree I'm somewhat right here, and I've even heard commentators (i.e. Mary Joe Fernandez) talk about Sharapova's poor forehand form.

Nadal definitely does it as well, but honestly his is done in a different way, althought it may look the same to the average viewer. Nadal's technique on his forehand is what creates his crazy topspin, that with the combination of an extreme western grip. You will notice that if Nadal is completely still, in the middle of the court, and has plenty of time to prepare, his forehand goes across his chest rather than over his head. And not that it is ok to do all the time, but I also think Nadal has a bit more muscle to get away with this than Sharapova.

I'm simply trying to point out a fact that, injuries could be cut down and prevented if some technique issues were dealt with, and I think Sharapova is a great example. I think there was another thread recently talking about why don't pros get tennis elbow as commonly as the club/recreational player, and that is directly related to form. All in all, pros form is far superior than club players' form. If you have good technique and the ability to not "shank" many balls, subsequently, you will have a much easier time in staying away from tennis elbow.

HollerOne5
05-31-2006, 02:27 PM
And also note, that Sharapova's pectoral strain, was on her RIGHT pectoral muscle. The same side she has the crazy swing on the forehand. Coincidence?

tennissavy
05-31-2006, 03:30 PM
HollerOne5:

First of all, Sharapova's injury was most likely an overuse injury. Also, Landsdorp gets full credit for Sharapova's forehand and backhand. He was interviewed and quoted on his website and in tennis mag. so don't be so fast to throw the word idiotic down in response to my post.

siber222000
05-31-2006, 03:57 PM
Actually, Sharapova does have poor forehand form. Just because Lansdorp taught Davenport and Austin, doesn't mean that he was the first coach to ever get a hold of Sharapova and train her on her forehand. Sharapova worked with Lansdorp after she spent years in Russia AND at the Bolleteri academy, so I don't see how you can conclude she has good form just based on who her coach has been - idiotic.

And, I do believe it is ok to wrap around the forehand at certain times, espcially on the run. This creates a lot more power when you don't have a lot of time to set up and/or put your bodyweight into your shots. I'm not a fool and I know what I'm talking about....Sharapova takes her forehands all the way around her whole body on silly shots, like easy put-aways at the net, swinging volleys, and times where she has an immense amount of time to set up properly for her shot. I'm telling you I think that kind of technique puts too much strain on her upper body instead of relying on all her forward momentum and body weight to generate power.

I didn't mean for this discussion to turn into a debate on Sharapova's form, but I think you'll have to agree I'm somewhat right here, and I've even heard commentators (i.e. Mary Joe Fernandez) talk about Sharapova's poor forehand form.

Nadal definitely does it as well, but honestly his is done in a different way, althought it may look the same to the average viewer. Nadal's technique on his forehand is what creates his crazy topspin, that with the combination of an extreme western grip. You will notice that if Nadal is completely still, in the middle of the court, and has plenty of time to prepare, his forehand goes across his chest rather than over his head. And not that it is ok to do all the time, but I also think Nadal has a bit more muscle to get away with this than Sharapova.

I'm simply trying to point out a fact that, injuries could be cut down and prevented if some technique issues were dealt with, and I think Sharapova is a great example. I think there was another thread recently talking about why don't pros get tennis elbow as commonly as the club/recreational player, and that is directly related to form. All in all, pros form is far superior than club players' form. If you have good technique and the ability to not "shank" many balls, subsequently, you will have a much easier time in staying away from tennis elbow.

form works for sharapova so i dont think u should keep talking about how bad her form is, and if her form is bad, she have a coach who is WAY better than u, so dont even worry about it.

btw, what difference does it make when u say her form is bad? is sharapova actually going to look at ur posts and change her form? answer that question

and tennissavy have a points that are better than urs, so u should think before u post anything

Slazenger
05-31-2006, 04:06 PM
How can you criticize Sharapova for having bad technique on her forehand??? She was taught by Lansdorp, who taught Davenport and Austin among other great champions. The commentators have praised her technique back when she won wimbledon and now. So you think it is bad form to follow through over one's head? No one does it more than Nadal but you're not picking on him. Maria does it maybe two out of 10 times. Nadal does it all the time and he isn't injured in the shoulder area.

Actually Sharapova's form on her FH leaves a lot to be desired.
Yes she was taught by Lansdorp, but Lansdorp will be the first to tell you he is all about full strokes. He favours moderate grips and is more concerned with swinging through the ball than the wrap finish.
He apparently started to study the reverse forehand after Sampras started using it on balls he was late on.

To say that Sharapova hits the over-the-head forehand 2 times out of 10 is absurd. 8 out of 10 is more like it.

It isn't bad form to follow through over the head. Sharapova however DOES have bad form when she hits the shot.

Best way to see this is to compare Davenport and Sharapova when they hit this shot. Davenport is balanced, has her weight moving into the shot and hits through the ball and as a result uses an energy efficient motion.
Davenport is a textbook case of how to hit that shot.

Sharapova on the other hand is usually off-balance and backs off the shot. In slow-mo video tape you can see her bending backwards as she hits it. It's like she's always hitting the shot late. Hitting the shot this way means you are driving the shot with only your arm basically. Do this enough and you can pull/strain something.
(I however was impressed with her 1st rd match at RG. It looked MUCH better than usual. Here's hoping she can keep it up.)

However Sharapova's forehand where she hits through and finishes over her left shoulder is VERY good and I think she should be hitting this shot more. It is much more penetrating while taking less energy and robs her opponent of time.

About Nadal; He is MUCH stronger than Sharapova and can get away with it as a result.

HollerOne5
05-31-2006, 05:23 PM
Actually Sharapova's form on her FH leaves a lot to be desired.
Yes she was taught by Lansdorp, but Lansdorp will be the first to tell you he is all about full strokes. He favours moderate grips and is more concerned with swinging through the ball than the wrap finish.
He apparently started to study the reverse forehand after Sampras started using it on balls he was late on.

To say that Sharapova hits the over-the-head forehand 2 times out of 10 is absurd. 8 out of 10 is more like it.

It isn't bad form to follow through over the head. Sharapova however DOES have bad form when she hits the shot.

Best way to see this is to compare Davenport and Sharapova when they hit this shot. Davenport is balanced, has her weight moving into the shot and hits through the ball and as a result uses an energy efficient motion.
Davenport is a textbook case of how to hit that shot.

Sharapova on the other hand is usually off-balance and backs off the shot. In slow-mo video tape you can see her bending backwards as she hits it. It's like she's always hitting the shot late. Hitting the shot this way means you are driving the shot with only your arm basically. Do this enough and you can pull/strain something.
(I however was impressed with her 1st rd match at RG. It looked MUCH better than usual. Here's hoping she can keep it up.)

However Sharapova's forehand where she hits through and finishes over her left shoulder is VERY good and I think she should be hitting this shot more. It is much more penetrating while taking less energy and robs her opponent of time.

About Nadal; He is MUCH stronger than Sharapova and can get away with it as a result.

Thank you, someone else who knows what they are talking about. Its ridiculous to just say someone has great form because someone like Lansdorp coached them, without actually analyzing the stroke. I have no preference on Sharapova or her game - I'm just giving an analysis that I feel is obvious.

bennieboi
05-31-2006, 05:37 PM
I'm sick of always hearing about certain players that are always injured, but this is directly related to bad form on their shots, especially with these upper-body injuries.

For instance, should Maria Sharapova be CONSTANTLY injured at age 18 or 19? Her pectoral strain that prevented her from playing a full schedule last year, is most likely related to the fact that her forehand technique is so incredibly bad, its no wonder. Anyone see her constant wrap around the head technique even on high balls? That is so bad on the shoulders and such when you are hitting with that much pace consistently.

On the flip side, its so rare to hear that Roger Federer is injured. Couldn't this be due to the fact that his form is pretty much textbook perfect? Of course, he rolled an ankle or two, but that isn't related to technique.

I'm sorry, I just find this crap annoying. The players complain about how the schedule is too long and thats why they cant play without being injured, but I think if they really looked at some of their form, they would realize the root of the problem.

sorry guy, but i think you're really full of it. even if it is form, no one is perfect, and playing at their level, it makes perfect sense for someone to get an injury, pros play all year around, and hardly get vacation.

arosen
05-31-2006, 05:49 PM
Sharapova consistently gets into semis or better of practically every tourney she enters. She has played so much tennis, I am surprised her hands haven't fallen off completely.