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TurbeauxTiger
06-02-2006, 01:59 PM
does anyone have some stats about pro players like they do with football players?

superman1
06-02-2006, 04:33 PM
Lifting? Well I know Agassi can lift 375 lbs or something like that. Most tennis players can probably do about half of that.

BaseLineBash
06-02-2006, 04:42 PM
Lifting? Well I know Agassi can lift 375 lbs or something like that. Most tennis players can probably do about half of that.
Close, I believe Gil said Andre could bench 350lbs.

Ronaldo
06-02-2006, 04:52 PM
ESPN or the NFL Network should have a reality show sending athletes from ALL sports to Indy and the combine. Bet the hockey players rule that show.

Sadyv
06-02-2006, 05:44 PM
I know that the guy that James Blake works with on his speed and conditioning also works with alot of NBA players on the same drills.

He said that James would be among the bottom of the NBA players that he works with. So, one of the faster guys on the pro tour is about equal to a slow NBA player.

AllCourt
06-02-2006, 06:34 PM
well tennis players use different types of speed in their matches from basketball players. the drills that blake uses with nba no doubt make him quicker for tennis, but they are basketball specific, which is why basketball players are better at them. in tennis-specific drills, such as sudden explosive movement over 5 to 10 feet with hand eye coordination, tennis palyers would be ranked probably about as high as most nba players.

superman1
06-02-2006, 06:54 PM
Most of those b-ball guys are 6'7" and rippled with muscles. Of course they're going to be faster than 6'1" Blake. But it takes a different type of athlete to play tennis for 5 sets. That can really wear you down, mentally and physically. And tennis is such a complex sport that you're not going to have the time to be in the gym all day, you've got to be out on the court working on a million different things and studying your opponents.

Sadyv
06-02-2006, 09:21 PM
No, you guys misunderstand.

The trainer was not having Blake do basketball drills, they were general exercises for any athlete that speed and quick acceleration are important to.

Also, being taller, the Nba players should actually fare worse. Their longer limbs take a longer amount of time to accelerate up to speed. Thats why most sprinters and runners in track and field events are average heigth.

Its unfortunate, but tennis, particularly in the United States, does not have the greatest athletic talent pool. Most of the best athletes get picked up by basketball, football, tennis, hockey, even a sport like amatuer wrestling, which has no professional equivalent, has millions and millions of young men and women who compete in it for most of their life, and more intensely.

I remember Kevin Garnett being at the US Open, and he being fascinated by watching them play.

Can you imagine if, as a youngster, an athlete of Garnett's level and size got into tennis and stuck with? A 7 footer with the serve to match who would be able to move faster than 80-90 percent of the other pros on the tour? It boggles the mind. He'd be ripping 140 MPH serves from way up in the air, and moving like Nadal.

superman1
06-02-2006, 09:34 PM
There are GREAT athletes in tennis right now, and their physicality is perfect for the sport. These are world-class athletes. Put them on the track and they'll go all day. Maybe they're not built like basketball players, but that's not a requirement for being a great tennis player. Roddick is 6'2" and not built like a b-ball player, but look at his serve. It's all in the form.

To train for basketball you spend most of the day in the gym. To train for tennis, you spend all day out on the court, and if you don't have a match the next day then you can do 30 minutes of light lifting. It's not a good comparison. If you could somehow magically transfer Federer's tennis talent to Kevin Garnett, then yes, he'd be even better than Federer. But that would require magic.

35ft6
06-03-2006, 12:12 AM
There are GREAT athletes in tennis right now, and their physicality is perfect for the sport. These are world-class athletes. There are some exceptional athletes in tennis, but compared to some other sports they're not that great. And overall, the athletic ability in tennis is... well, compared to the NBA and NFL, it's a joke. Nadal is considered about the best pure athlete in tennis right now and he would be average in the NFL based on athleticism alone.

But tennis players are some of the best conditioned and skilled athletes out there. In terms of skill, I put them wayyyyy up there. I know some recent article put boxing on top, but those guys don't have to work nearly as hard to develop their boxing skills as tennis players do to gain their racket skills. I've heard of guys who started late, and boxed only for a few years only to become a champion. It's a sport where you can go pretty far on pure athleticism.

superman1
06-03-2006, 12:43 AM
What does a big, hulking guy have to learn to play football? Just go out there and pound your body into their body. Tennis requires brains, and thus there is less brawn. A 5'5" skinny guy can hit the ball harder than a 6'5" muscle man if he has more experience.

Mikael
06-03-2006, 02:29 AM
If massive 6'7'' guys would indeed dominate tennis at the higher level you'd have seen way more of them by now. For about 15 years now tennis has reached a "plateau" level, where racquet technology and overall technique haven't really gotten better, so it's down to superior athletes to make a difference. By now it's pretty clear what kind of physique works in tennis and what doesn't. Those guys who are taller than 6'3'' seem to get injured all the time because of all the wear and tear on their bodies, especially knees. That's the chief limiting factor. Mirnyi is about the only extra-tall guy I can think of who hasn't been plagued by injuries. I'd say a Roddick kind of guy, 6'2'' at 180lbs or so, is the ideal physique for tennis. As someone else said also tennis is a much more technical game than football or basketball so the guys cannot afford to spend much time in the gym.

Ronaldo
06-03-2006, 04:56 AM
Can you imagine if, as a youngster, an athlete of Garnett's level and size got into tennis and stuck with? A 7 footer with the serve to match who would be able to move faster than 80-90 percent of the other pros on the tour? It boggles the mind. He'd be ripping 140 MPH serves from way up in the air, and moving like Nadal.

20 yrs ago Yannick Noah was considered to have great athletic ability. You can see which sport his 7 foot son Joakim chose. http://www.tennis-x.com/fun/2006-04-06/noah.php

Sadyv
06-03-2006, 10:54 AM
Yeah, Noah's son is a pretty good basketball player.

Guys, I love tennis to, but comparing athletes like MAx Mirnyi to Duane Wade, Lebron James, is really a stretch.

THink, why would, at least in the United States, a super athletic teen who is 6'6-6'8, can jump 40 inches and move and accelerate and sprint at great speed, start playing tennis, an expensive sport to play, when basketball is widely popular and easy to afford?

I'm not saying that pure athleticsim is all that matters, obviously not. Safin is a very solid athlete, 6'4, strong and fast, but lacks the focus. But wouldn't it be nice with a larger talent pool, we would see guys even more physically talented than Safin, and odds are at least a couple of them would have the mental toughness to excel. ANd then we would see something special.

Also, boxing training and skills is far more difficult than tennis, paritcularly at the lower weigh classes. When preparing for a fight, 8 hours of intense training, conditioning and skills training, is the norm.

Marciano used to start everyday with a 5-6 mile run, and when training for a fight it went up to 9-10 every day. That was what he did as soon as he woke up.

Also, the punishment and physical demands that a single boxing match puts on the body is greater than several tournaments of tennis. There is a reason that at the top levels boxers only fight 2-3 times a year.

guernica1
06-03-2006, 02:08 PM
What does a big, hulking guy have to learn to play football? Just go out there and pound your body into their body. Tennis requires brains, and thus there is less brawn. A 5'5" skinny guy can hit the ball harder than a 6'5" muscle man if he has more experience.

Football is actually a lot more complex than most people give it credit for. An NFL playbook has a lot of schemes that are not necessarily easy to know or understand. In fact, I would be willing to say that a good NFL quarterback or middle linebacker tends to be a very bright individual.

And as much as I am a fan of pro tennis, how many pro's do you know that you would question their brains? yes, the same guys that bash mindless errors at crucial points in a match, or net second serve returns on key breaks.

Would you say Gael Monfils is a "smart player"? Or Richard Gasquet for that matter?

Give football players some more credit; yes at the high school level when most people experience the typical "dumb jock" they may not have much brains, but at the highest level, its a lot more complicated sport.

And no, never played football at any level.

35ft6
06-03-2006, 02:44 PM
Also, boxing training and skills is far more difficult than tennis, paritcularly at the lower weigh classes. When preparing for a fight, 8 hours of intense training, conditioning and skills training, is the norm. I was talking comparing the skills of tennis and boxing. Boxers can take months off, get out of shape, then train and still come back to defend their title. They can do this numerous times. Boxers don't start boxing at age 4 and move to a boxing academy at age 12 to box 4 hours a day. In terms of skill, I think tennis is a much tougher sport.Also, the punishment and physical demands that a single boxing match puts on the body is greater than several tournaments of tennis. There is a reason that at the top levels boxers only fight 2-3 times a year. I won't disagree with that. 12 rounds in the ring against Julio Cesar Chavez is even more brutal than 5 sets against Agassi, but, then again, we're talking about a sport where the objective is to punch the other person. The tour de france is physically more brutal than winning Wimbledon but I'm not sure what that's really saying. Tennis takes more skill than cycling. In terms of skill, I'd put tennis, gymnastics, and figure skating above boxing.Football is actually a lot more complex than most people give it credit for. An NFL playbook has a lot of schemes that are not necessarily easy to know or understand. In fact, I would be willing to say that a good NFL quarterback or middle linebacker tends to be a very bright individual. An NFL playbook is just crazy insane. You're right, it's a lot more complex than some people might think.