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View Full Version : Help! How to continue playing tennis with tennis elbow


destan
07-14-2004, 08:20 PM
Can anyone share about how you manage to continue playing tennis despite suffering from tennis elbow? Would like to hear some successful tips as I love tennis too much to take a long break! Thanks.

James Brown
07-14-2004, 08:55 PM
ice it, take breaks for a couple of days in between matches/sessions. relax a lot, swing softly and take it easy. thats what i do. hurts like a mofo.

lanky
07-15-2004, 06:29 AM
I have had severe TE advice _Correct racquet eg PK5G low string tension soft string coaching assesment as to stroke mechanics exercises.All helped but still got TE.Only able to play regularly now because switched to DBH backhand from single.Amazing feeling not having pain in elbow next morning after playing a match. Made me release how used Id become to elbow pain .

drakulie
07-15-2004, 07:05 AM
Don't play until it is completely gone.If that does not suffice, try the advice from the other users.

Ronaldo
07-15-2004, 01:12 PM
destan, consult your family physician and get a referral to a sports medicine specialist. Found out the hard way after an x-ray that what I thought was just persistant, nagging TE was really the initial on-set of arthritis. Now forced to limit my tennis to every other day, no more than 60 minutes of singles or drills each session or 3 sets of dubs. Rehab took away the chronic pain but two days of tennis in a row reminds that this condition still exists.

destan
07-15-2004, 05:03 PM
Thanks for all your advice... I did stop for about 10 days and the pain went away, but when I started again, the pain came in after a few days. The double backhand is an interesting suggestion, but it may be beyond me as I have played with single backhand all this years.. Will take a lot to change.

Guess that I am looking for quick-fix solutions (eg wonder cream, good stretching and warm up exercises, strengthening exercises, massage, icing etc) that others have tried and worked, or at least, keep TE in check to continue playing regularly (everyday?). Is there anyone out there who has somethings to share with all of the TE sufferers?



btw, I came across this CT Cream in the net for TE, is that good?
For info, I am a 4.0 to 4,.5 level player, with single handed backhand.

lanky
07-16-2004, 12:51 AM
destan-I .am an old geyser -late 40s.Switching to a dblh backhand after many years single has been difficult but possible.There are many variations of dbh backhand one of which is bottom hand dominant somewhat like a sh backhand with an extra strut.Give it a go .I am very one sided but ive managed to do it .Is my bachhand better? no is it adequate-yes.But no more pain after all these years of TE -I am now able to play tennis on consecutive days for example

menelaos
07-16-2004, 07:35 AM
Destan, I was experiencing burning when I started playing 3 or 4 days in a row. The problem was my swing...I was putting a lot of burden on the elbow. Try and relax the grip on the racket and do NOT cut swing in the middle. Keep following through.
I would suggest that you modify your swing so that you "scoop" the ball instead of trying to hammer it flat. A loose grip on the racket and "scooping" - going from underneath it- will require you to get to the right spot quickly, then open your racket early, so that you don't have to "short-swing" accross the ball. A scoop swing will allow you to brush the ball instead of hammering it. After you "sccop" it, your arm will move upward -instead of accross your chest-. The combination of this and the loose grip will minimize the burden on your elbow because it's a much more natural move. I believe this is why tennis pros don't have with their elbows. They have a loose grip on the racket + they bend down to reach the ball. This way as they are trying to hit the ball they put their whole body behind the stroke -rather than arm power.
Hope this helps,
Menelaos

destan
07-17-2004, 05:27 PM
thanks guys for all the sharing.

Presently, I have started to ice after every session, and trying to rest at least a day in between sessions. Hope that the moderation will help.
I have also started doing more stretching (bending my palm forwards and backwards). I realised that the elbow is stiff if I do not use it for a while and after I stretched, it will feel ok.
Also, applying massaging some deep heat on and off (when it is convenient). Will keep all posted about my progress....

Anyway, does Glucosamine help? Still looking for a wonder cream...

destan
07-17-2004, 05:27 PM
thanks guys for all the sharing.

Presently, I have started to ice after every session, and trying to rest at least a day in between sessions. Hope that the moderation will help.
I have also started doing more stretching (bending my palm forwards and backwards). I realised that the elbow is stiff if I do not use it for a while and after I stretched, it will feel ok.
Also, applying massaging some deep heat on and off (when it is convenient). Will keep all posted about my progress....

Anyway, does Glucosamine help? Still looking for a wonder cream...

TMB
07-19-2004, 10:22 AM
To reinforce points made by others... Ice right after playing (and then 4-6 hours later) has made a huge improvement in reducing my pain. And I do exercises: Reverse wrist curls have been helpful; also I put a rubber band around my fingers and then expand the band. Building in recovery periods (for me 2-3 days) between playing is helpful too.

sanitarium
07-25-2004, 03:56 PM
hey man, one quick cure might be an arm brace designed specifically for that, i've got one in case.
Go to a health club or something, it's basically a brace with velcro that you can tighten around your forearm right before your elbow, does wonders in keeping the tendons around the bone instead of swelling - and causing tennis elbow.

never put heat on your elbow, you need to do Rest Ice Compression Elevation.

Always ice your elbow, keep it wrapped and try to get a brace during match play. This will help wonders.

Rickson
07-25-2004, 05:02 PM
Glucosamine with chondroitin will definitely help and if you feel a lot of pain, ice it down, don't put heat on it.

rocky b
07-26-2004, 04:59 AM
Yes heat after you are playing ice then heat. The reason tennis elbow does not heal is because that area has bad blood flow. Heat with help with that . If you ice it all the time you will never heal the area. I had tennis elbow for 3 years got surgery did everthing under the sun to heal it.

Rickson
07-26-2004, 12:05 PM
Yes heat after you are playing ice then heat. The reason tennis elbow does not heal is because that area has bad blood flow. Heat with help with that . If you ice it all the time you will never heal the area. I had tennis elbow for 3 years got surgery did everthing under the sun to heal it.
The reason you ice down an injury is because you want to get rid of the swelling. Heat will increase swelling. You can put heat on the area once it has healed, but heat during the healing process will delay healing, not speed it up.

hifi heretic
07-26-2004, 03:12 PM
Rickson,
Bear in mind that there are an increasing number of experts now who strongly disagree with using ice as a treatment for tennis elbow. In their view Tennis elbow does not stem from tendonitis, but rather from a condition called tendonosis. Microscopic studies of cells taken from the damaged tendon of tennis elbow patients confirm this.

Tendonitis refers to a tendon that is chronically swollen. Tendonosis, on the other hand, is a condition where the strands of the tendon become distorted, misaligned and basically begin to break-down. This process - some argue - occurs when a tendon continues to sustain injury quicker than it is able to repair itself. Repair occurs so slowly because there is such limited blood flow to the area. Without adequate blood flow, the tissue cannot adequately regenerate. Applying ice in this case is absolutely counterproductive. Ice dramatically reduces blood flow to the area to which it is applied... As an aside, some doctors - for the very same reason - are starting to question the widespread use NSAIDS (ibuprofen, Alleve, etc..) by those suffering from tendon&ligament injuries. Some research suggest that these medicines may also restrict blood flow to an injured site.

..Keep in mind that the standard treatments that doctors have recommended for tennis elbow for the last 3-4 decades have largely failed. ...So one has to question to rationale behind these treatment.

16
07-26-2004, 09:22 PM
I have had tendonitis is my wrist. Always iced after. Icing is good for sore muscles but in my experience heat is better for tendonitis and parts of the body like the shoulder(rotocuff) that get little blood flow.
My advice let it get to the point were light exercises and stretches don't hurt so bad. Then heat and do the light exercises and stretches. Ice does nothing imo for tendonitis, tennis elbow, or any other related injuries(don't get a lot of blood flow). I can only speek from experience but i have gradually re-enforced my joints with light weight exercises building more muscle around the areas and haven't had any wrist or tennis elbow pain for awhile. I beleve those bands also help for tennis elbow.(got one from my club called "ban-dit" i believe.

rocky b
07-27-2004, 01:46 PM
He is still playing the area will never heal with just ice. I have suffered with tennis elbow for years. The only way I can play is a Pro Kennex 5g soft strings and ice after I play then heat in between days.



Yes heat after you are playing ice then heat. The reason tennis elbow does not heal is because that area has bad blood flow. Heat with help with that . If you ice it all the time you will never heal the area. I had tennis elbow for 3 years got surgery did everthing under the sun to heal it.
The reason you ice down an injury is because you want to get rid of the swelling. Heat will increase swelling. You can put heat on the area once it has healed, but heat during the healing process will delay healing, not speed it up.