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asdf1991
07-14-2006, 01:13 AM
is it true that tighter tension for crosses (say 5 lbs) will restrict string movement, and help them (mains and crosses) to snap back into place,and seem not to have moved at all. (this is for smooth strings, like Lux BB Original). so is this true, or is it vice versa (tighter mains).


if mains and crosses are strung at same tension, will higher tension be better than lower tension for restricting movement and help snap back into original position? for example is 63 lbs better than 57 lbs?

ambro
07-14-2006, 10:27 AM
Strings move less generally at higher tensions.

Also, I find that higher cross tension does help restrict string movement, not totally, but noticeably.

TennisProPaul
07-14-2006, 11:41 AM
Differential tensions
Question:

Are there any frames where the crosses are tensioned differently than the mains?
Answer:

The Wilson tennis frames that feature Rollers come to mind, but most frames can accept different tension on the crosses than on the mains -- either higher or lower -- as long as both are within the tension range for that frame. Also, in hybrid string sets, it is commonplace to tension the gut or synthetic crosses higher than the aramid or poly mains. When using the same string for both the mains and crosses, it has been suggested that lowering the tension on the crosses emphasizes characteristics of the mains, while raising the tension on the crosses emphasizes the characteristics of the crosses. If you look at the pro equipment logs that we've published over the years (and which are available in the members-only section of our website), you will note that there are several pro players who use different tensions for the mains and crosses.

TennisProPaul
07-14-2006, 11:44 AM
Differential string tensions
Question:

I have a customer who has requested that I string his racquet with the crosses two pounds lower than the mains. He says that he heard that this "locks in" the mains. I've never heard of this, have you?
Answer:

Stringing the mains and crosses at different tensions is not new, and in fact, a quick check of the pro equipment logs we've published over the years (available on-line) shows that more and more of the pros are asking for differential tensioning. We've not heard, however, that lowering the tension on the crosses "locks in" the mains, and frankly, we're skeptical of this claim. According to Babolat, the main strings are responsible for durability and spin, while the crosses are responsible for power and comfort. Reducing the reference tension on the crosses would thus increase power and improve comfort, and possibly increase spin potential.

Because of the differences in string lengths between the mains and the crosses, dropping the reference tension on the crosses partially equalizes the installed tension of the crosses compared to the mains. Dropping the reference tension on the crosses also reduces the tension increase on the mains due to the weaving and tensioning of the crosses.

One thing to watch when dropping the tension of the crosses relative to the mains (or vice versa) is that you are changing the stress on the frame. Always measure the dimensions of the hoop before and after stringing to ensure that differential tensioning isn't distorting the hoop.

We should mention that manufacturers require differential tensioning on some racquets, which are clearly demarked in the Stringer's Digest.

Gaines Hillix
07-14-2006, 12:06 PM
Anecdotally, some players believe that increasing the tension on the crosses reduces string movement. I have never seen this proven one way or the other. All strings move. Poly strings move back into place more easily than others because of their slick surface. In the case of a nylon string, some people believe that increasing the tension of the crosses makes them move a little less.

asdf1991
07-14-2006, 04:39 PM
it's possible to have different tension for mains and crosses (higher crosses) with one peice stringing?

but is it advisable? e.g put the frame under undue stress?

TennisProPaul
07-14-2006, 04:46 PM
it's possible to have different tension for mains and crosses (higher crosses) with one peice stringing?

but is it advisable? e.g put the frame under undue stress?

a few lbs up to 5lbs as long as its in the tension range should do no harm.

one piece or 2 piece tighter cross is no problem.

remember usually its better to lower the cross 2 -5lbs to help even the string bed out, IF YOUR GOING TO INCREASE THE CROSS TENSION IMO it should be with a softer string then the main ... ie like natural gut in the cross, or a much softer string then the mains

correct me if im wrong fellas

jaykay
07-16-2006, 07:31 AM
Paul: ur posts in this thread r very helpful. Thank u.

Valjean
07-16-2006, 07:52 AM
In my experience tightening the crosses can enhance control; I've normally raised that tension for myself by 2 lbs. for years now.

Another way it's used, though, is less enlightened--some retail stringers do so just in order to say they did not raise the tension of the entire racquet over the manufacturer's recommended tension limit.

Anyone with misgivings about doing this at any point might recall how string savers can reduce string movement too.

TennisProPaul
07-16-2006, 08:31 AM
Paul: ur posts in this thread r very helpful. Thank u.

im learning to be helpful and not harmful. yw

Lagger
07-16-2006, 08:58 AM
According to Babolat, the main strings are responsible for durability and spin, while the crosses are responsible for power and comfort.

Interesting, as I find it's almost universally discussed here that the mains are responsible as the source of power when Babolat says the opposite. Could you post a source? Thanks

travlerajm
07-16-2006, 09:21 AM
With the slick Luxilon-type strings, you want the mains to be able to move as much as possible. That's why low tensions are required. But most pros don't get enough control with both mains and crosses strung in the low 50s, so most pros string the crosses a few pounds tighter. If you go more than a 2 or 3 lbs tension difference, then the racquet head distorts. So many pros also use a thinner cross string, which further stiffens the crosses without adding any more differential tension to the frame. Some of the smarter pros like Spadea actually use a 15g gut main and a 17g Lux cross, to allow more difference in stiffness between the mains (which should be maximally elastic), and the the crosses (which should be slick but stiff enough to maintain control).

TennisProPaul
07-16-2006, 09:29 AM
Interesting, as I find it's almost universally discussed here that the mains are responsible as the source of power when Babolat says the opposite. Could you post a source? Thanks

The info I posted came from the

http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/index.html

I became a temp member a year ago and copy and pasted that Q & A for future ref. You need an ID and password to get access to it now.

IMO:
Mains= 50% durability, 25%power, & 25% control
Cross= 20% durability, 40% power, & 40% control

With each string and tension diff and hybrid the %'s above will shift, but not much.

jaykay
07-16-2006, 10:05 AM
The info I posted came from the

http://www.racquetsportsindustry.com/index.html

I became a temp member a year ago and copy and pasted that Q & A for future ref. You need an ID and password to get access to it now.

IMO:
Mains= 50% durability, 25%power, & 25% control
Cross= 20% durability, 40% power, & 40% control

With each string and tension diff and hybrid the %'s above will shift, but not much.

Going by the same formula above, how will the following 2 hybrids compare:

1) Mains: Babolat Tonic+ 16 at 59lbs, Cross: BB Ace 18 at 56lbs
2) Mains: BB Ace 18 at 57lbs, Cross: Babolat Tonic+ at 60lbs

... in terms of durability, power, control, spin.

For your reference, I have a Dunlop M-Fil 200 Plus 2006, which is slightly mod-ed (2 grams each at 3 and 9, 4 grams at top of handle, 2 grams on buttcap) and I currently have Babolat Tonic+ 16 in the mains at 60lbs and Gosen OG Sheep Super Micro 17 at 58lbs (I think). This is over ~25+ playing hours old and the gut has started to fray visibly.

I'm looking for comfort, control, spin and some power. I'd like to take a good cut at the ball and still keep it in play (don't want it spraying long).

Let me know.

Thnx.

asdf1991
07-16-2006, 05:24 PM
With the slick Luxilon-type strings, you want the mains to be able to move as much as possible. That's why low tensions are required. But most pros don't get enough control with both mains and crosses strung in the low 50s, so most pros string the crosses a few pounds tighter. If you go more than a 2 or 3 lbs tension difference, then the racquet head distorts. So many pros also use a thinner cross string, which further stiffens the crosses without adding any more differential tension to the frame. Some of the smarter pros like Spadea actually use a 15g gut main and a 17g Lux cross, to allow more difference in stiffness between the mains (which should be maximally elastic), and the the crosses (which should be slick but stiff enough to maintain control).


good info, but im looking to maximise durability with Lux BB original, 1 peice. so u would recommend to string mains and crosses at same same tension (low of course)?