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Ben42
07-14-2006, 07:08 AM
I play with a Wilson nPRO 98 and up until now Iíve been stringing it with Prince Lightning XX 17. Itís a good string and gives good control, spin, and power on my groundstrokes, but it doesnít give me very good feel or touch, especially on volleys. Itís also breaking pretty fast.

I tried some Dunlop MaxComfort 16 for the past couple of week and it gives me much better feel and touch on volleys, but terrible control on groundstrokes. It just feels really inconsistant; some balls flying and some landing short on a stroke that feels the same.

Iím going to order some other strings to try. Something that will be consistent and controlled, like the Lightning, but that has better feel.

Iím thinking PSG 17 (not with duraflex) and Iso-Speed Professional 17.

Iíd like to keep under $10, since I hit with a fair amount of top and do break strings. Any other strings I should check out?

Midlife crisis
07-14-2006, 08:15 AM
I play with a Wilson nPRO 98 and up until now Iíve been stringing it with Prince Lightning XX 17. Itís a good string and gives good control, spin, and power on my groundstrokes, but it doesnít give me very good feel or touch, especially on volleys. Itís also breaking pretty fast.

I tried some Dunlop MaxComfort 16 for the past couple of week and it gives me much better feel and touch on volleys, but terrible control on groundstrokes. It just feels really inconsistant; some balls flying and some landing short on a stroke that feels the same.

Iím going to order some other strings to try. Something that will be consistent and controlled, like the Lightning, but that has better feel.

Iím thinking PSG 17 (not with duraflex) and Iso-Speed Professional 17.

Iíd like to keep under $10, since I hit with a fair amount of top and do break strings. Any other strings I should check out?

I get on this rant every so often, so please excuse me.

What is feel? Is it impact harshness? Is it vibration? And what good does it really do for you? By the time the impact travels the length of your tennis racquet into your hand, and your nerves start to send that information to your brain, the ball has left the stringbed around the time the information has reached the nerves at about the level of your shoulder. By the time your brain receives the first impulses from the contact, the ball is long, long gone from the strings and you have no way of altering that previous shot.

What you really need to know from the impact sensation itself is just how well you hit the ball, whether solidly or a mis-hit, and to what degree. You then use your eyes to determine if the ball went where you expected it to, and you make adjustments from that visual information. If "feel" were so important, tennis instructors would have an extremely difficult time teaching, because they aren't in contact with the racquet that is doing the hitting. Yet, just from listening to the quality of the impact and seeing where the ball goes, they can pretty much tell what happened right or wrong, and make good suggestions as to how to make it better or how to correct it.

Overly relying on "feel" just provides another mental weakness that can work against your game, kind of like "My racquet feels different today, so I'm sure I won't play as well".

That being said, you'd probably be a candidate for one of the newer softer poly strings, whether in a hybrid or as a full stringjob. Some of the softer ones play a lot like synthetic gut on softer shots, but firm up more as you hit harder. You'll have lots of spin potential, durability, and "feel". For a cheap intro into poly strings, I'd suggest Polyon SP.

MTChong
07-14-2006, 08:41 AM
Now, I haven't tried it yet, but many people on the boards here liked the Yonex Tour Super 850 - just don't get the spin.

TennisProPaul
07-14-2006, 10:50 AM
If you want something that STINGS WITH FEEL you might want to try a hornets nest or any bee.

If you want a STRING WITH FEEL TRY THE BELOW SUGGESTION.


Try Technifiber Pro Mix 17g. Best feeling string I have ever used by far. Incredible touch on volleys and drop shots. Im sorry gut boys but all the gut i have tried does not feel this good. It seems the gut creates so much power its hard to control, but this string seems to have the perfect mix, IMO

Its 10 bucks

Amazing feel & touch string & great power and spin on groundies.

Gut to me is like a high matience woman. Very testy.

Technifiber Pro Mix 17 is like a sweet country girl that just wants to please you

:)

ps: promix 17g does sting the ball with feel, SO STINGS WITH FEEL ACTUALLY WORKS

Ben42
07-14-2006, 11:47 AM
Well, Midlife, maybe I should have said “touch” instead of “feel”

But what I’m trying to describe is being able to absorb the pace from a very hard hit passing shot, or digging out a low ball with a good angle volley, or feathering a pass that’s slow but has a lot of spin so it dips past someone at the net. In other words knowing that when I hit a softer shot it be just right, not float long or present a sitter to an opponent.

I’ve found that stiff strings, like Polys or Luxilons types don’t give me that ability, but they are really good a hitting topspin groundstrokes. On the other hand I can hit nice touch shots with a soft multi, but then my groundstrokes are very inconsistent.

I know I’m looking for a compromise string. Since I’m putting in an order I figured I try out a few different sets. I’d rather string a cheaper, less durable string more often than play with a more durable string that doesn’t play how I’d like.

So far I’m going to try PSG 17 (non dura), Iso-Speed Professional 17, Wilson Extreme Syn Gut 17, and Babolat Conquest 17.

I’ve tried the Yonex 850 and I preferred the Lightning XX. I guess I really do like a 17 better then a 16. I’ve also tried E-Matrix and it makes my arm/wrist hurt. I can’t figure that out, but it’s happened every time I’ve put it in my racquet. I’ve also tried natual gut/syn gut hybrids, which were good, but not good enough to justify the expense.

TennsDog
07-14-2006, 11:54 AM
I might suggest Iso-Speed Control over Professional (same string, thicker guage). It still has great touch/feel, but will give added durability for you. And don't worry, you won't out play the strings, they don't lose playability.

As for feel, even if how they felt didn't affect the shot, if polys and multis gave the exact same results, I would still highly prefer multis because they feel better to hit. It's like driving a Benz instead of an Escort. They both get you to the same place, and just as fast (if you're obeying speed laws), but the Benz just feels a heck of a lot nicer.

Midlife crisis
07-14-2006, 12:06 PM
But what Iím trying to describe is being able to absorb the pace from a very hard hit passing shot, or digging out a low ball with a good angle volley, or feathering a pass thatís slow but has a lot of spin so it dips past someone at the net. In other words knowing that when I hit a softer shot it be just right, not float long or present a sitter to an opponent.

I think what you're really after is a certain stiffness curve in a string. Strings made of different materials behave differently under different conditions, so when you look at something like the USRSA string map, which tests strings at only one test condition, you might find two strings, like a stiff synthetic and a soft poly, both test the same but as you know, they play drastically differently. However, at impacts at that one stress level, they should feel basically the same.

It sounds like you prefer a more linear response so poly strings are not going to work for you. MaxComfort is really a totally average string from all playability aspects, IMO, and is probably one of the worst strings from a movement aspect. My wife has a full Biphase stringjob and that gives a very gut-like feel. It has low tension loss and so far has proven durable.

Midlife crisis
07-14-2006, 12:10 PM
As for feel, even if how they felt didn't affect the shot, if polys and multis gave the exact same results, I would still highly prefer multis because they feel better to hit. It's like driving a Benz instead of an Escort. They both get you to the same place, and just as fast (if you're obeying speed laws), but the Benz just feels a heck of a lot nicer.

Sure, there's a difference between a Benz and an Escort, but the way that the controls feel has a direct impact on what the vehicle is doing at that moment. It's not like you turn the steering wheel and then let go until the car completes the turn. You can correct and re-correct as often as you are able to. This is not true for tennis, because the ability to correct actually is gone even before the ball is even struck. The way a shot feels has no impact whatsoever on where that shot is going, and you're going to use your eyes to more than anything else to let you know if that shot went where you expected it to, and that is the information you would use to adjust for the next shot.

And again, I think it is just something else that can mentally mess you up. As a for-instance, baseball players are in the same situation - once you hit the ball, how that hit feels has no impact whatsoever on where the ball is going, but you never hear baseball players talk about how they'd like a different feel in their bat. They'd go for whatever gives the most powerful hit, and basically feel be d*amned. Tennis, like baseball, is hard enough without having to worry about things you have no control over.

Ben42
07-14-2006, 02:14 PM
I’ve got to disagree with you on this one. A baseball hitter is only concerned with two things when hitting a baseball: the direction and speed of the ball. He’s not trying hit with a specific kind of spin. He’s not trying lob a ball over the backhand shoulder of the shortstop or to hit the ball around the third baseman and have it hook in at the end.

For me feel is everything in tennis. There is only so far that thinking about strokes as individual parts can get you. (Bend your knees, keep your elbow in, lay your wrist back, etc…) For me it’s “how did it feel overall when I hit that good shot” and then repeating that. You can feel when you hit a good forehand. I want my racquet set-up to be consistent with that feeling. When I can feel I’m hitting the same good stroke over and over then the ball should go to just about the same spot every time.

Midlife crisis
07-14-2006, 02:32 PM
For me feel is everything in tennis. There is only so far that thinking about strokes as individual parts can get you. (Bend your knees, keep your elbow in, lay your wrist back, etcÖ) For me itís ďhow did it feel overall when I hit that good shotĒ and then repeating that. You can feel when you hit a good forehand. I want my racquet set-up to be consistent with that feeling. When I can feel Iím hitting the same good stroke over and over then the ball should go to just about the same spot every time.

Are you saying that you can tell from the feel where the ball went after you hit it? Do you think you would have an easier time telling where the ball went by looking at it or by feeling the impact?

But still the original question is what does the feel do for you on that one shot? Everything that can determine where that shot is going to go has long happened by the time you feel it. You can't guarantee the same feeling the next shot because you might not hit it the same way, and the feedback from your visual system is way more important. That's why coaches can coach you without knowing how the shot felt to you when you hit it.

ppeter
07-14-2006, 02:33 PM
Iso-Speed both Control and Professional are great, but recently I've discovered Gosen Super Tec A. K. Pro 16 and I like it even more. It's not moving so much, durability is beter and for me the feeling is great.

TennsDog
07-14-2006, 07:08 PM
Are you saying that you can tell from the feel where the ball went after you hit it? Do you think you would have an easier time telling where the ball went by looking at it or by feeling the impact?

But still the original question is what does the feel do for you on that one shot? Everything that can determine where that shot is going to go has long happened by the time you feel it. You can't guarantee the same feeling the next shot because you might not hit it the same way, and the feedback from your visual system is way more important. That's why coaches can coach you without knowing how the shot felt to you when you hit it.
Feel is a very important characteristic to look for in string selection for many people, including myself. I understand what you are saying that how it feels at impact does not change where it goes, a nicer feel is obviously more preferable. One can more quickly tell how the ball will act off of the stringbed by feel than by sight. I know when I hit a ball badly immediately, whereas I would have to wait to see where it went if I couldn't feel it. This allows me to react to my own shots quicker. Another thing to consider is that strings with different feels also have different playabilities. One can generally assimilate the feel of a string with its playing characteristics. Thus, one will like the way a string feels because of the way it plays. This gets embedded in a player's mind and can then make a large psychological impact.

TennisProPaul
07-14-2006, 07:44 PM
Feel is a very important characteristic to look for in string selection for many people, including myself. I understand what you are saying that how it feels at impact does not change where it goes, a nicer feel is obviously more preferable. One can more quickly tell how the ball will act off of the stringbed by feel than by sight. I know when I hit a ball badly immediately, whereas I would have to wait to see where it went if I couldn't feel it. This allows me to react to my own shots quicker. Another thing to consider is that strings with different feels also have different playabilities. One can generally assimilate the feel of a string with its playing characteristics. Thus, one will like the way a string feels because of the way it plays. This gets embedded in a player's mind and can then make a large psychological impact.


YOU ALL ARE LIKE ZEN MASTERS

Valjean
07-15-2006, 02:32 AM
Ben42, Gosen's very solid OG Sheep Micro Super JC, plus the Wilson Extreme you already have in mind are a good bet for you. String the Courier string a couple of lbs. lower, however. Tecnifibre's newest multi, Multifeel, may help you out, too. Babolat's Fibertour is a trustworthy standby.

tennis life
10-28-2006, 07:32 PM
Wilson enduro pro 17 is very soft and has a nice consistent feel on groundstrokes

snoflewis
10-28-2006, 07:58 PM
for feel, i'd look at some multis. sensation is a decent string...but not too durable. the yonex multis are all under $10 and are very good

fuzz nation
10-31-2006, 08:55 PM
I'm crazy about Laserfibre Laserlite in 16 or 17 ga. Nothing has provided better feel as far as synthetics that I've tried in my Wilson Prostaff 6.1 Classics. Never been interested in poly...

Details at laserfibre.com

donut
10-31-2006, 09:40 PM
wilson nxt has amazing feel behind gut but thts over ur $10
2nd id say is big banger ace but that costs even more x_X

under 10 dollars id have to say head rip control

127mph
10-31-2006, 09:56 PM
I play with a Wilson nPRO 98 and up until now I’ve been stringing it with Prince Lightning XX 17. It’s a good string and gives good control, spin, and power on my groundstrokes, but it doesn’t give me very good feel or touch, especially on volleys. It’s also breaking pretty fast.

I tried some Dunlop MaxComfort 16 for the past couple of week and it gives me much better feel and touch on volleys, but terrible control on groundstrokes. It just feels really inconsistant; some balls flying and some landing short on a stroke that feels the same.

I’m going to order some other strings to try. Something that will be consistent and controlled, like the Lightning, but that has better feel.

I’m thinking PSG 17 (not with duraflex) and Iso-Speed Professional 17.

I’d like to keep under $10, since I hit with a fair amount of top and do break strings. Any other strings I should check out?
Gut. spend and extra ten for titan gur if you must.

OccasionalTennis
02-14-2007, 09:40 AM
wilson nxt has amazing feel behind gut but thts over ur $10
2nd id say is big banger ace but that costs even more x_X

under 10 dollars id have to say head rip control

I'm currently trying to trade NXT for Iso-speed pro/control. NXT has good playing characteristics, but who can resist the temptation to try the 'unique" feel of pure polyolefin ribbon?

(my email's in my profile btw- if anyone wants to indulge my temptation ;)

TonyB
02-14-2007, 02:37 PM
Here's how racquet properties break down for me:

Feel/Feedback - the response you get from your setup, in terms of indication of off-center shots vs. sweet spot hits. In other words, how much "information" is communicated through your racquet into your hand/arm. With some frames that have an extremely "muted" feel, you have no clue how well you hit your shot until you see it cross over the net. With muted racquets, I've often thought to myself, "Damn, I just barely touched the ball and look at it go!" Because the racquet didn't "tell" me how the ball felt when it was hit.

Comfort - how "soft" the racquet plays, whether it's comfortable in your hand without any jarring sensations or unwanted vibrations. Sometimes a racquet can be stiff, but still very comfortable. Flexibility is not a requirement, although it helps.

Touch - how "linear" of a response you get out of your racquet; not too much power when you hit the sweet spot and not too great of a dropoff as you deviate from the sweet spot. Sometimes stringing a racquet at extremely high tensions can even out the stringbed and provide a lot of touch, but it might be extremely uncomfortable and the feedback might be masked. Flexible racquets can sometimes have better inherent touch because even though the ball may be contacted outside of the sweet spot, the frame will still flex enough to provide sufficient power to offset the mis-hit.

Control - how "accurate" your shots travel relative to your stroke. How easy it is to place a ball where you want it, without making tremendous adjustments to your stroke. This is obviously influenced heavily by the string type and tension.

Power - obvious. How much power "gain" (amplification) you get out of your stroke.


Anyways, that's just how I see it. I'm sure people will have varying opinions, but this is the jargon that I use when I describe how racquets play.

Redflea
02-14-2007, 03:26 PM
Very nice, Tony...well said. You otta be teachin' a class... :)

AlpineCadet
02-16-2007, 11:36 PM
Wilson Reaction has great feel, and it's a very crisp string. Look up the reviews if you want more of the same opinions. Though these strings only last less than 10 hours of play (~less than a week.)