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FalconX
07-23-2006, 01:44 PM
Damn I was surprised to see the game today on HD. That was freaking awesome. I think HD captures the speed of the game a lot better than the old analogue or SD and I noticed things that I could not see before in the players strokes. I want more tennis in HD. Anybody know if CBS will show USopen in HD?

Grigollif1
07-23-2006, 01:50 PM
I'm sorry fot not knowing this but, What does exactly HDa improves? The sound the quality of the image...?

alienhamster
07-23-2006, 01:52 PM
Damn I was surprised to see the game today on HD. That was freaking awesome. I think HD captures the speed of the game a lot better than the old analogue or SD and I noticed things that I could not see before in the players strokes. I want more tennis in HD. Anybody know if CBS will show USopen in HD?

If the USOpen is indeed on HD this year, can we all come over to your place and watch the final? :)

FalconX
07-23-2006, 01:57 PM
I'm sorry fot not knowing this but, What does exactly HDa improves? The sound the quality of the image...?
HD=a lot more pixels so details and color (especially in Plasma) improves tremendously. Tennis is perfect for HD because the setting is static and only the players move so it eliminates some the problems that HD has with movement.

The sound usually improves too if you have a system for it. Most HD broadcasts are in dolby digital so you can hear different sounds from different speakers.

Slice Approach
07-23-2006, 02:05 PM
HDTV is awesome. Once you've seen it...it's hard to watch anything else. Another tournament I saw was the AIG Open in Japan on INHD. It was crystal clear and an amazing viewing experience.

jasonbourne
07-23-2006, 02:41 PM
CBS does broadcast the USO in HD. They did last year.

moopie
07-23-2006, 02:47 PM
It would be cool if they showed a few points from the sideline view in HD. That would make better use of the widescreen.

TN1
07-23-2006, 03:31 PM
Honestly, I don't see tennis being in HD being a killer use of HD. Of course the better resolution will be nice. The thing is unlike other sports HD doesn't give you a big viewing advantage as in basketball and football. Due to the way those sports are shot and filmed you actually see more of the court and field in those sports. You get to see what people are doing further down the court or see what the corner and defensive backs are doing before the pass is thrown. In tennis personally, I don't think seeing the audience sitting there on the sides of the court is going to be a big advantage. Would be interesting if they have gave us more shots right on the court from a players advantage though. Think about getting to see what returning Roddick's serve would look like or the actually motion of a Nadal forehand.

sandiegotennisboy
07-23-2006, 03:54 PM
HD is the sh1T. looks so real on my tv.

stormholloway
07-23-2006, 03:57 PM
Why wasn't Wimbledon in HD..?

Or was it.. cause it wasn't on the channel I was watching.

KBalla08
07-23-2006, 06:33 PM
ya that final was sweet in HD, i was surprised they actually showed it in HD.
o and no, wimbledon wasnt in HD

gully
07-23-2006, 08:13 PM
If you get Universal HD, they will carry all of the USA simulcast in HD. Nice stuff. Agreed that today's HDcast looked impressive.

Last year, ESPN2HD showed some of the USO Series -- Pilot Pen, I think, maybe one other -- in HD. But not much. And almost no one gets the channel.

sandiegotennisboy
07-23-2006, 08:19 PM
If you get Universal HD, they will carry all of the USA simulcast in HD. Nice stuff. Agreed that today's HDcast looked impressive.

Last year, ESPN2HD showed some of the USO Series -- Pilot Pen, I think, maybe one other -- in HD. But not much. And almost no one gets the channel.

that sux. now that ive seen a tennis match in HD (we just got it like 3 days ago), i dont think id want it any other way... you would think they would broadcast all sports matches in HD nowadays. earlier today, i watched the WTT in regular cable and it looked so sh1tty compared to the rca match in HD>

Rabbit
07-24-2006, 04:17 AM
Tennis, and any other sport, is great in HD. Locally, our cable company is TimeWarner and last year (once we had power back after Katrina), I was very pleased to see that they added USA's HD channel. I got to watch the entire Open in HD and it does make a great difference.

AAAA
07-24-2006, 06:52 AM
Would be interesting if they have gave us more shots right on the court from a players advantage though. Think about getting to see what returning Roddick's serve would look like or the actually motion of a Nadal forehand.

They used to have ground level camera angles at Wimbledon but with the shorter and shorter skirts being worn by the women the camera angle was considered inappropriate.

TN1
07-24-2006, 11:47 AM
They used to have ground level camera angles at Wimbledon but with the shorter and shorter skirts being worn by the women the camera angle was considered inappropriate.


Well, let's just skip the women then. I wouldn't mind seeing that, but I still think it would be interesting to see a Nadal groudstroke in flight. As long as they change the camera angle so I don't see anybody picking at their pirate pants, I'll be happy. It's interesting though how they have this new technology but aren't really doing anything innovative yet. Well see in the years to come though.

ShimSham
07-24-2006, 11:54 AM
Why wasn't Wimbledon in HD..?

Or was it.. cause it wasn't on the channel I was watching.

In the UK, Wimbledon was shown in both SD and HD.

KBalla08
07-24-2006, 11:56 AM
Tennis, and any other sport, is great in HD. Locally, our cable company is TimeWarner and last year (once we had power back after Katrina), I was very pleased to see that they added USA's HD channel. I got to watch the entire Open in HD and it does make a great difference.
what channel is USA's HD channel?

beernutz
07-24-2006, 02:37 PM
I'm sorry fot not knowing this but, What does exactly HDa improves? The sound the quality of the image...?

IIRC, regular TV in the US is 480 lines of resolution, while HDTV here is 720 lines of resolution and is progressive, not interlaced. Progressive means an entire screen image is presented at one time which improves reproduction of fast movement on screen. Interlaced displays half the picture first (e.g. the odd lines) then then fills in the other half (the even lines). HDTV also has a higher display rate (frame rate) than regular TV.

GRANITECHIEF
07-24-2006, 03:22 PM
I'm considering getting an HDTV (45" LCD Sharp Aquos), but the problem is 95% of programming is not in HD and doesn't look so good, worse than a regurlar CRT TV.

What do you HDTV owners do about that?

Also, how to decide between Plasma and LCD?

KBalla08
07-24-2006, 03:50 PM
replacement for Plasma and HD Projection is way more expensive then LCD or DLP. thats y i got LCD.

arosen
07-24-2006, 04:56 PM
HD phucking rocks, best viewing experience ever.

skip1969
07-24-2006, 05:35 PM
it's cool, but like someone else said, not a lot of programming on hd yet. and the costs is still an issue for most average joes. give it a few years.

Slice Approach
07-24-2006, 07:26 PM
GraniteChief, I have a 45" LCD (Sony Wega) and am very happy with it. I'm sure the Sharp is also good. I have looked at plasmas and the pictures are comparable. One thing to consider is that if you want to wall-mount it then you will need to go with a plasma...LCD's are bulkier and usually placed on a flat surface.
I am no expert, but was told at Circuit City that LCD's have an internal bulb that will need replacing periodically (several years depending on use). Plasma sets do not have this bulb and last longer but are more expensive. HDTV has some really unique, original programming that is really cool. ESPN-HD is great especially during football season. Most of the movie channels are in HD.

Piccolo
07-25-2006, 03:37 PM
A couple of things about HD. Most HD broadcasts are 1080i, which means 1080 lines of resolution vs. 480 for standard definition. Eventually, broadcast HD will be 1080p, which is really nice, but that won't be for a few more years. The only network to broadcast in 780p was Fox sports, but I'm not sure they haven't changed to 1080i.

About HD displays: There are basically 4 technologies: CRT (big box rear projectors or tube TVs), LCD (slim rear projectors ~18" deep, flat panel, front projector), DLP (slim rear projectors ~18" deep, or front projector), or Plasma (flat panel). What you choose should be based on the room environment it will be in, your budget, and your viewing preferences.

Slice Approach: first off, don't listen to anyone at a big box electronics store, they don't know anything. Flat panel LCDs and Plasma do not have an internal bulb. LCDs have charged pigments, and plasma used charged gasses, that when a current is added, change shade or color. Same size LCD or Plasma, the LCD will last twice as long or longer. Plus, plasma is highly susceptible to image burn-in, so unless you only watch wide-screen programming, I wouldn't reccomend one.

Personally, I have 2 HD sets. A rear projection CRT for my dedicated home theater, and a 32" CRT tube TV for general TV viewing. My rear projector is a wide screen 16x9 aspect. My tube TV is standard 4x3 (aspect ratio: 4x3 looks like a normal TV you've had your whole life), which works well to watch normal SC broadcasts, and the occasional HD broadcast with black bars at the top and bottom.

Wow long first post! I guess it's because I like home theater almost as much as tennis!

fastdunn
07-25-2006, 05:41 PM
HD=a lot more pixels so details and color (especially in Plasma) improves tremendously. Tennis is perfect for HD because the setting is static and only the players move so it eliminates some the problems that HD has with movement.


You mean LCD based displays sometime have problems with fast
movements, right ? Plasma and CRT based HD does not really
have response time problems worse than analog tube based TV
as I understand.

beernutz
07-28-2006, 12:23 AM
A couple of things about HD. Most HD broadcasts are 1080i, which means 1080 lines of resolution vs. 480 for standard definition. Eventually, broadcast HD will be 1080p, which is really nice, but that won't be for a few more years. The only network to broadcast in 780p was Fox sports, but I'm not sure they haven't changed to 1080i.

About HD displays: There are basically 4 technologies: CRT (big box rear projectors or tube TVs), LCD (slim rear projectors ~18" deep, flat panel, front projector), DLP (slim rear projectors ~18" deep, or front projector), or Plasma (flat panel). What you choose should be based on the room environment it will be in, your budget, and your viewing preferences.

Slice Approach: first off, don't listen to anyone at a big box electronics store, they don't know anything. Flat panel LCDs and Plasma do not have an internal bulb. LCDs have charged pigments, and plasma used charged gasses, that when a current is added, change shade or color. Same size LCD or Plasma, the LCD will last twice as long or longer. Plus, plasma is highly susceptible to image burn-in, so unless you only watch wide-screen programming, I wouldn't reccomend one.

Personally, I have 2 HD sets. A rear projection CRT for my dedicated home theater, and a 32" CRT tube TV for general TV viewing. My rear projector is a wide screen 16x9 aspect. My tube TV is standard 4x3 (aspect ratio: 4x3 looks like a normal TV you've had your whole life), which works well to watch normal SC broadcasts, and the occasional HD broadcast with black bars at the top and bottom.

Wow long first post! I guess it's because I like home theater almost as much as tennis!

Thanks for correcting me Piccolo and for providing the good information on alternative HDTV technologies. I just bought a 56" Samsung DLP (1080p) which is absolutely fantastic. The clarity is unreal and I haven't even played a Blu-Ray or HD-DVD disk yet.

FalconX
07-29-2006, 07:16 AM
You mean LCD based displays sometime have problems with fast
movements, right ? Plasma and CRT based HD does not really
have response time problems worse than analog tube based TV
as I understand.

No actually you'd be right about LCD. But what I'm talking about is the broadcast quality. Most of the channels use compression that on Plasma or any kind of TV causes pixelation and sometimes ghosting when there is fast movement in the background. That has nothing to do with the technology of your TV set but it concerns the broadcast quality. Tennis generally doesn't have that problem because cameras rarely move.

emcee
07-29-2006, 07:38 AM
If you also want to play Top Spin 2 on an Xbox 360, get an LCD.

Anyone else having problems getting HD antennaes to work??

gully
07-29-2006, 10:55 AM
Does anyone get ESPN2-HD? Was the broadcast from LA in HD? (I watched the regular SD feed, but for replays, they'd flash the "ESPN2HD" logo, so I wondered.) If it was in HD, how'd it look?