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Golden Retriever
07-24-2006, 01:12 PM
Is it true that a pro seldom hits as hard as he can but he always swing as fast as he can? So what's the difference between hitting hard and swinging fast? Aren't they the same thing?

MT120
07-24-2006, 02:08 PM
When I think of hitting hard i think hitting cleanly and driving the ball "through the court" (keeping it deep).

35ft6
07-24-2006, 02:29 PM
Same thing with the serve. Pros swing as hard on the second serve as they do on the first serve, but the first serve will be 130mph and the second second might be 95mph. Different trajectory, more spin.

Max G.
07-24-2006, 06:02 PM
If most of the speed of the swing is low-to-high, then that'll translate into more spin instead of more pace. The swing speed always stays the same, the question is how much of that swing speed is going into spin and how much into pace.

Kevo
07-24-2006, 07:04 PM
No, the swing speed doesn't always stay the same. Anyone who has watched closely would know that it doesn't. The length of the swing changes, as does the speed, and the racquet angle. Maybe if you always hit the ball waist high to their forehand, everything would stay the same, but not when the ball is all over the court.

Watch Nadal make those crazy backhand angles on the run to pass for a winner. Very different stroke than his normal backhand. Watch federer hit a down the line backhand pass versus the loopy cross court pass. Very different.

As for your question. Swinging fast doesn't necessarily say anything about how hard you hit the ball. That is pretty much about trajectory. Consider a topspin lob versus a normal topspin rally ball. Speed of swing could be similar, but the result very different.

Max G.
07-24-2006, 07:29 PM
Well, about Federer's backhand especially - it's a different stroke, but I think in both of them he's going for "maximum-racquet-speed-that-he-can-control", isn't he?

...actually, I suppose I just answered my own question there. You swing as fast as you can while still keeping control, and that maximum-controllable-speed would vary based on what shot you're hitting - you might have to slow down your stroke to not shank it, for example, if you're going for extra-spin. Or depending on whether you're in position or not.

So nevermind, I guess.

(And I suppose this doesn't apply to things like slice or volleys anyway.)

NamRanger
07-24-2006, 07:34 PM
Well, about Federer's backhand especially - it's a different stroke, but I think in both of them he's going for "maximum-racquet-speed-that-he-can-control", isn't he?

...actually, I suppose I just answered my own question there. You swing as fast as you can while still keeping control, and that maximum-controllable-speed would vary based on what shot you're hitting - you might have to slow down your stroke to not shank it, for example, if you're going for extra-spin. Or depending on whether you're in position or not.

So nevermind, I guess.

(And I suppose this doesn't apply to things like slice or volleys anyway.)



For crosscourt top spin, yes Federer is most likely swinging somewhere between 80-85% of his maximum speed that he can produce, but he usually holds back a little bit.


When making a passing shot, Federer the majority of the time actually tones down on the power and just places the ball really well and away from his opponent. It's usually fast enough so that his opponent can't catch it. There are however exceptions, such as when Federer is in position to crank up the power.