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View Full Version : The Definition of Polarization??


Amone
08-11-2006, 03:06 PM
Now, I understand the concept of polarization, and I understand (at least a little) the how and why of it. But I had to wonder: If a frame is completely depolarized, does that make it centralized, or spread out??

I imagine Travelerajm could answer this one with ease, but anyone who can help me out here, it's something that's been bothering me.

bleno567
08-11-2006, 08:23 PM
a frame thats completely depolarized is completely spread out.

btw, nice avatar

travlerajm
08-12-2006, 12:06 AM
Actually, a racquet with weight concentrated in the center of the frame would be maximally "depolarized."

A typical stock racquet has a fairly uniformly spread weight distribution, which means that it is neither polarized nor depolarized.

When talking about pro racquets, the difference between a depolarized pro frame and a polarized pro frame is the location in the handle where the counterweighting goes. Both depolarizers and polarizers put plenty of lead in the hoop.

A "polarizer" (i.e., a player like Nadal or Davydenko who relies mostly on spin for depth control) typically puts his counterweighting near the buttcap, which maximizes spin.

A "depolarizer" (i.e., a player like Blake or Agassi who relies mostly on precise rebound trajectory for depth control) typically puts his counterweighting near the top of the handle, for maximum power.

Amone
08-12-2006, 05:24 AM
So, wait, let me see if I've got you right, Traveler... you're saying that the Cauthen theory's spot on deadly accurate?? So in reality, the words you use are different... but you're behind the same theory. Who knew!

travlerajm
08-12-2006, 11:22 AM
So, wait, let me see if I've got you right, Traveler... you're saying that the Cauthen theory's spot on deadly accurate?? So in reality, the words you use are different... but you're behind the same theory. Who knew!

If you are able to separate out his imaginative and entertaining conspiracy theories, much of what Cauthen says is accurate and useful. His knowledge seems to come mostly from many years of trial and error, whereas I prefer to start out with physics principles and then test them out.