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View Full Version : does the racquet make u a better player?


badboi78
08-12-2006, 08:02 AM
Just as the question states.. does the racquet really make that much of a difference? Or is it really more of the player and less of the racquet? What if somebody handed federer a graphite racquet? Will he still be able to beat players in the top 10?

darknight08
08-12-2006, 08:06 AM
Psychologically...YES

milo
08-12-2006, 08:14 AM
no, i don't think so. you could see safin as an example. i think he already got the right racket in fact he won the australian open. but what has he done after that. absolutely wrong. is it the racket? or it is himself?

Amone
08-12-2006, 08:30 AM
Yes, it matters. No, it doesn't matter. Both are completely true, and at the same time.

Is a racquet the only factor, no. In fact, I'd have to say that Fed could play just as well with woodies. The only problem would be the repeated snapping from the power strokes.

However, can a racquet be the difference between a big W and a big L, yes. This is painfully obvious with players who get a ton of added power from using, say, a Head i.S12 or NCT Drive, but my Diablo Mid (for instance) did add a lot of control to my game that I doubt I'd have had with a Babolat stick.

Hence, my answer is: Yes. No.

chiru
08-12-2006, 08:36 AM
Yes, it matters. No, it doesn't matter. Both are completely true, and at the same time.

Is a racquet the only factor, no. In fact, I'd have to say that Fed could play just as well with woodies. The only problem would be the repeated snapping from the power strokes.

However, can a racquet be the difference between a big W and a big L, yes. This is painfully obvious with players who get a ton of added power from using, say, a Head i.S12 or NCT Drive, but my Diablo Mid (for instance) did add a lot of control to my game that I doubt I'd have had with a Babolat stick.

Hence, my answer is: Yes. No.

this is pretty much right on the money. does the racket make or break how good of a player you are? not necessarily. can a racket be used to maximize existing player level, absolutely. can it make the difference between a 6-4 loss or 6-4 win, i think it can, if nothing else than having confidence ot go for your shots.

tennis life
08-12-2006, 09:22 AM
it certainly helps with confidence, i use a Babolat Pure storm team right now and i love it, i have the mindset that i can put a lot of spin on the ball, and that really helps with getting more spin and playing better

Dunlopkid
08-12-2006, 11:08 AM
If the racket is causing you tennis elbow, that might be the diff between winning and losing.:rolleyes:

onkystomper
08-12-2006, 01:26 PM
I think the answer is Yes the racket can make you a better player.

It can add 5% or so to your game if you use a racket that suits you just as the wrong racket can make you 5% worse.

If you think the racket is going to make you a 5.0 when you were a 2.0 before you picked it up... well do i need to say that you perhaps should have a rethink

Steve Huff
08-12-2006, 01:38 PM
Rackets make a LOT of difference. They dictate, to a degree, the style you play. When rackets had small heads and thick cross sections (ie. wood), you would never see a player using an extreme Western grip. You'd be framing every other ball if you did. Borg's grip was about as far over that you'd see in the top 50 anyway. There were still baseliners and netrushers, but the strategies were different. When more powerful rackets came out (aluminum and steel), styles were beginning to change. Servers hit monster serves. They came to the net even more. Baseliners cranked up unbelievable power. They stayed back even more. "All-court" players weren't nearly as effective. Then, rackets got bigger and thinner. You could hit more topspin and not have to worry about hitting the frame as much. Netrushers were finding balls at their feet everytime they approached. With a few exceptions, baseliners began to win more. Sampras was about the only top player keeping the serve and volley game alive, and that was mainly because he had such a big serve. If you watch his matches, they became more and more difficult for him to get to the net when he was returning serve. Now, there are only a handful of netrushers, and none in the top echelon (Fed is NOT a netrusher. I'd go as far as to say that he's a baseliner with the ability to get to the net occasionally). Some people think styles are cyclical. I don't foresee any technology or rule changes that will bring serve-and-volley back. So, in my opinion, rackets do have a lot to do with how people play tennis.

Amone
08-12-2006, 01:42 PM
Rackets make a LOT of difference. They dictate, to a degree, the style you play. When rackets had small heads and thick cross sections (ie. wood), you would never see a player using an extreme Western grip. You'd be framing every other ball if you did. Borg's grip was about as far over that you'd see in the top 50 anyway. There were still baseliners and netrushers, but the strategies were different. When more powerful rackets came out (aluminum and steel), styles were beginning to change. Servers hit monster serves. They came to the net even more. Baseliners cranked up unbelievable power. They stayed back even more. "All-court" players weren't nearly as effective. Then, rackets got bigger and thinner. You could hit more topspin and not have to worry about hitting the frame as much. Netrushers were finding balls at their feet everytime they approached. With a few exceptions, baseliners began to win more. Sampras was about the only top player keeping the serve and volley game alive, and that was mainly because he had such a big serve. If you watch his matches, they became more and more difficult for him to get to the net when he was returning serve. Now, there are only a handful of netrushers, and none in the top echelon (Fed is NOT a netrusher. I'd go as far as to say that he's a baseliner with the ability to get to the net occasionally). Some people think styles are cyclical. I don't foresee any technology or rule changes that will bring serve-and-volley back. So, in my opinion, rackets do have a lot to do with how people play tennis.

At the risk of making this a pro player discussion, what would you say about Murray's eager (and successful) forays to the net?

I think that the reason you or I can't forsee any technology or rule changes is because most people have a seriously hard time thinking outside the already created and thought of.

Spindarella
08-12-2006, 01:50 PM
The racquet does not make you a better player.

However, some racquets will let you reach your full potential as a player while others won't.

zhan
08-12-2006, 01:52 PM
The racquet does not make you a better player.


yes it does..

AngeloDS
08-12-2006, 01:56 PM
It depends really.

Swissv2
08-12-2006, 02:01 PM
ask this question to sampras. in fact, he has already answered this question.

MTChong
08-12-2006, 02:02 PM
Not necessarily a better player, but what a racquet can do if it suits your game is unlock your potential ability at any given moment. I know I play better with some racquets than others; I don't attribute that to it making me a better player; instead, I attribute it to the fact that the racquet suits my game.

newnuse
08-12-2006, 02:03 PM
Yes, use the PS 85" and you too can start winning slams on a regular basis

Viper
08-12-2006, 02:29 PM
The racket will not make you a better player, but if you buy one that suits you then it should maximize your strengths.

zhan
08-12-2006, 02:47 PM
me without my n6.1 i am nothing
my n6.1 without me it is nothing

Aeropro joe
08-12-2006, 04:01 PM
sorry for diverting the thread for a second, but i have a question for MTChong, do you hit at Laguna Creek Racquet Club in Elk Grove? i just played a tourny there

Aeropro joe
08-12-2006, 04:04 PM
and just so i contribute to this thread my response is that for me i feel more comfortable hitting with certain frames, but i can pick up and hit with any frame, although not neccessarily being able to hit the shots i own with thesse random rackets, i attribute this to 1) not being used to the frame and 2) the frame not being the best fit for your game.

acetennisman
08-12-2006, 04:25 PM
I believe that the racquet can make you a better player. One example is the ntrp rating system. Hypotheically speaking..if you need to be able to hit a certain shot to a certain depth in the court to be considered at a certain level(and you keep hitting the shot long);switching to a racquet with less power
will allow the shot to not go out, but instead very deep. This is only suggesting that you are a robot, and able to hit the ball to the exact same spot every time.
So technically yes. I personally feel that when serves come at me quickly, sticking out my n six on tour 90 help me hit the ball deep without fear of going long. If this is false however... than i just gave an example of the racquet having a psychological effect.

skraggle
08-12-2006, 05:26 PM
If you find a racquet that really complements your game, then it's a resounding YES. This was the case for me with my currrent sticks, which allow me to execute all my shots and therefore provide me with a stockpile of confidence.

Duzza
08-12-2006, 05:36 PM
To an extent, of course. You can't go on court playing with a Walmart racquet. As long as it has the specs that you're looking for, the feel will be the only concern.

alb1
08-12-2006, 06:04 PM
About 10 years ago when I decided to play some 30 and over singles tournaments after a 5 year layoff, I bought a couple of Pk Graphite Prophecys at Walmart. They were 60/40 graphite fiberglass mixes like the Pk Copper Ace I had used years before so i thought they would be Ok. I played a local teaching pro in the first round of a clay court tourney, he treated me like crap cause I showed up with cheap rackets in a gym bag. I had the last laugh cause I had spent 7 years playing on clay in Florida and he was used to hardcourts. I later moved on to better frames but that is still one of my most favorite matches.

Aeropro joe
08-13-2006, 05:42 AM
haha thats a great story! i would have loved to see the look on his prissy face after that

OrangeOne
08-13-2006, 05:51 AM
A great player will be a great player with any racquet. A good player will be a good player with any racquet. A crap player will be a crap player with any racquet.

BUT: I agree with those who have said that the right racquet will maximise a player's abilities. So a good player might be quite good with the right racquet, and not-so-good with the wrong one.

TENNIS_99
08-13-2006, 07:38 AM
A few months ago I played with a guy used to be on his HS team, come back to play tennis after a long lay off. I won probably the first 9 or 10 games. He broke his string and had no backup so I loaned him my LM radical. He then took the next three games from me! His ground strokes started to land in instead of sailing long.

I think it is very important to choose a right racquet for one in his/her tennis development. It will speed up the developing curve. IMO there are so many beginners/low rating players choose racquet because of its popularity regardless its demanding. I've seen players play 90'' stick missing here and there or playing stiffy stick going long all day and wondering he should increase the string tension.

Yes,technique is the key. But I think racquet plays a big role in helping player grasping the essence of technique and mold into muscle memory, and become a better player.

tennis_hand
08-13-2006, 05:35 PM
The right racket maximizes your ability, but your ability is the ceiling.
Hitting with a nCode Tour 90 doesn't make you a Roger Federer...

probably one of the millions of Federer wannabes. :mrgreen::mrgreen:

SydneyJim
08-13-2006, 05:35 PM
wtf type of question is this... NO

theace21
08-13-2006, 07:37 PM
A racket will not make you a better player, but a racket not suited for your game and experience will hamper your growth and improvement. It could cause injuries.

That is why people demo rackets, they hope to find one that matches their style.

badboi78
08-13-2006, 10:54 PM
so speaking of power racquet or low-power racquet.. how can u be so sure that it is the racquet's fault n not the string? if u hit ur shots long cant u fix it up by putting more pounds on ur string? or is it the frame difference?

emo5
08-13-2006, 11:35 PM
I thikn SydneyJim has the best answers here.
He's a Professional. He would know about how rackets improving your game.

jonolau
08-14-2006, 03:45 AM
50% boils down to technique.
25% is psychological (you must be in a confident and positive frame of mind)
25% is owed to your equipment.

You need to have the right technique to squeeze out the best from the frame.

OrangeOne
08-14-2006, 03:50 AM
I thikn SydneyJim has the best answers here.
He's a Professional. He would know about how rackets improving your game.

That's almost silly! The only person who *really* knows about whether or not a racquet improves your game or not - is you! (And maybe the people you play, and maybe your coach, your fan club, ok I'll stop now).

All due respect to SydneyJim, but just because someone's a pro does not mean they know the answer to this question, especially as it applies to each and everybody's game!

OrangeOne
08-14-2006, 03:55 AM
50% boils down to technique.
25% is psychological (you must be in a confident and positive frame of mind)
25% is owed to your equipment.

You need to have the right technique to squeeze out the best from the frame.

I'd say it's impossible to draw up such a matrix imho, as it depends on what "range" of frames you're talking about. Almost anyone of reasonable standardcould play within a few % of their best (after an adjustment period) with one of 5 or so different frames, anyone of lower standard this range probably only expands. Choosing from these frames, there's no way a racquet contributes 25%. Now choosing between everything from a k-mart frame upwards, maybe it does. Too many variables, to much estimation, etc etc.

Stan
08-14-2006, 03:57 AM
I believe the correct equipment can enhance your game, thus raising your level of play and making you a better player. The other day I was in a pick up match without my racquets. I tried playing with 3 different loaner sticks and could never find a good comfort level or the control that I have with my sticks. The combination of a good racquet with the proper strings makes a huge difference...at least in my game.

jonolau
08-14-2006, 04:05 AM
I'd say it's impossible to draw up such a matrix imho, as it depends on what "range" of frames you're talking about. Almost anyone of reasonable standardcould play within a few % of their best (after an adjustment period) with one of 5 or so different frames, anyone of lower standard this range probably only expands. Choosing from these frames, there's no way a racquet contributes 25%. Now choosing between everything from a k-mart frame upwards, maybe it does. Too many variables, to much estimation, etc etc.
No worries, OrangeOne, I understand the angle you're coming from. For those who have reached a higher level of understanding and competency of tennis, that guideline is out the window. We would probably be in a level now where we have good strokes and technique, and we know what type of specifications complement it.

The proportion works best as a guide for beginners. The first thing they need to work on is technique. Racquet selection is not so important, but does make a difference if they were to choose a less-demanding frame which would help their confidence in getting the ball over the net. The psychological part is to tell them not to give up and work on their technique.