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w00gy
08-15-2006, 06:02 AM
Hi all,

A year ago i started with a PD then quickly switched to a PS 6.0. The PD was too stiff thus it gave me a mild TE. Switching was the best thing ever. No more pain, no more holding back. I was able to swing as long, loopy and hard as i wanted without overhitting. I was in wonderland.

Now a year later. i'm a selfraterd 2.5 / 3.0. My movie will be up soon as i will play again thursday. Recently I noticed that other players playing as long as i've been ( 1-2 years) are pushing me around the court. I can recover due to "decent" footwork but i don't get enough juice (depth) to push back. What i do get, are tremendous angles combined with weird drops. This gives me the federer like miracle shot sometimes but ofcourse they are only seldom intentionally played.

I play with one hand on the FH and the BH. Long arm movement and followthrough combined with lazy kneebends and a decent body rotation.
I'm very strong and heavy ( 6"1, 205, 24 y) so that's why i don't want a "Cannonball" tweener like a babolat.

Maybe i'm getting lazy but i actually want a racquet with a litte more comfort. I want to trim down on my swing speed to get a more relaxed rhythm. When i saw the movie, it was my first 2 min warming up, i noticed my arm going like crazy in comparison to the rest of my body. I want my arm and body 'n sync. ( oops, is that the name of a boyband:oops:)


I'll keep the PS 6.0 as a trainer but i want a litte more, not too much, pop combined with a smooth/soft feel.

My current setup:


Racquet: Wilson Pro Staff 6.0 85"


String: Wilson sensation string @ 55 lbs/ 25 kg


Grip: Wilson leather grip with tournagrip overgrip. It was upped one size to L5 with Heatshrinksleeve

Weight: 381 grams :eek:



Any advice plz? ( a little lighter is ok, it's balance is very weird due to the addition of the heatshrinksleeve so it swings like a charm)



thnx

PS: Movie will be posted later today, i'm @ university now.

NoBadMojo
08-15-2006, 07:36 AM
You've gone from one extreme to another. There are many fine racquets that fall in the middle. Can you share why you chose to use the ps85 please? What happened to you is typical of what happens to most who use a far too demanding frame for their skillset.....people pass them by who have chosen something appropriate to swing.

vkartikv
08-15-2006, 07:45 AM
Suggestions:

1. You discard the ps 85 because you are only a 2.5-3.0. Find something in the midplus range instead, like the radical or warrior that offers comfort but still lets you take a decently long swing without overhitting.
2. Stick with the PS 85 but change the string tensions to where you feel comfortable about it.

For a big guy with long strokes, I don't understand how you don't get depth on your shots, even with the PS 85

basil J
08-15-2006, 07:55 AM
at a 2.5-3.0 level the PS 6.085 may be too demanding, but at your height and weight, you should be able to handle it IMO. My advice is that if you have a chance to video your strokes, review them and break them down.
Check the following:
Grip
Raquet preperation
Follow through
Footwork.
I know it sounds mechanical, but very often, when you can see what you are doing, you can often remedy a situation quicker than by just listening to friends or even a pro.
Are you taking any lessons? If not you may want to find a good teaching pro, let him or her know the what type of style you wish to play (I.E. base liner, all courter, serve & volleyer, counter puncher) and get a few things to work on. Part of the beauty of this sport is the journey you take to become a good player. Besides skiing, I can't think of another sport where so many different people with different levels of fitness and body types can excel.
remember 20 years ago, everybody played with 14 oz wood frames, so if the PS feels good in hand and comfortable to swing, it may be mechanics.
Good luck.

NoBadMojo
08-15-2006, 08:27 AM
One of the many myths circulated around this forum is that people think that just because someone has physical size, they can swing a heavy demanding frame fast enough. I've taught Div1 linebackers and lineman who could not swing 11ozs fast enough to cause any damage and taught scrawny juniors who could smoke the ball with 12 ozs..it's about the technique. the other issues is the sweetspot size...lesser players arent exctly precision ball strikers and thats what it takes to make a frame like the ps85 work.

another myth perpetuated on this forum is that everyone used 14oz frames back in the day..thats just flat out wrong. junior racquets were made out of wood and weighed much less and were shorter and much more maneuveurable, and if you cut an inch off a maxply fort it because much easier to swing. additionally the options were much less back then. people who actually played tennis during those times actually know about stuff like this

Kevo
08-15-2006, 09:27 AM
I agree with Mojo and Basil. If you are just missing slightly on technique, and that is preventing you from raising your level of play, a few lessons might be in order. On the other hand, it could just be that the PS 85 won't work for you and you would be better off with something a little lighter and bigger. If I were in your shoes it would be a matter of how much effort I wanted to put into the game. If you're willing to work, try the lessons. If you'd rather have more fun and ease your way up the levels, try a bigger lighter frame. Some demos of stuff around 100" and 11oz. would probably be where I would start.

uxnaitoahz
08-15-2006, 09:33 AM
I don't think it is suitable for 2.5 - 3.0 players to use the PS85. Heck, I am a 4.5 and I admit it, I am not good enough for that racquet. I suggest that you develop your game more. Once you reach somewhere around 4.0, you can try your PS85 again, but for now I'd say go demo racquets and find something comfortable and control-oriented yet not too demanding.

FH2FH
08-15-2006, 09:58 AM
Do a racquet search here http://www.racquetfinder.com/ for something lighter and slightly more powerful. I agree with the 11oz -ish range and the 98-100 sq/in head. Keep the stiffness below 65 and you'll be able to tweak the power with tension and string type/gauge.

I use a 300G MP and Head i.Radical MP. These are good lighter, semi-low power racquets. Unfortunately TW isn't selling them now...?? If you need more power you can always add tape to the head or use some thin, spongy string. With that PS you're lugging around a lot of weight for a 2.5/3.0 who's not gonna have excellent timing/preparation.

You can calculate the power of your racquet by multiplying the:
headsize (sq/in) * stiffness * swingweight

For example:
PS 6.0 85 = 1845
300G= 1881
iRad=1863

This will give you a general quideline of what you need (in terms of power). A difference in "50" is noticeable to me; 200+ would be dramatic.

** Keep in mind swingspeed (slower with a heavier racquet) and string type/tension/gauge will also affect power.

w00gy
08-15-2006, 11:41 AM
Take a look at this boys 'n girls.

http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?p=1078067#post1078067

Heft, weight, swingweight or whatever you call it is no problem because the balance has changed. Maybe after 2,5 hrs of playing and sprinting it feels a bit sluggish but certainly not in a 3 set match.

On the run, power of my PS just seems a little low and that's when you want the racquet to some work for you. That's why I'm thinking about switching raquets.

I have to add i only recently got into tactics because i did not feel confident enough last year. I've only been playing a year and i really want to start counterpunching my opponents when driven to the edge of the court and take control of the rally. This I can't do with the low power of the ps. Thus i get wacked every time because my strokes lack in depth and pace.

If i only i could execute a more controlled stroke and get good depth and pace...... "sigh"

Hope you enjoy this!

FH2FH
08-15-2006, 11:57 AM
If the weight isn't a problem and you're comfortable with that racquet you can change the strings, drop the tension, go with a higher gauge, add lead strips. What are you stringing it at now? What strings are you using? Strings DO make a big difference.

I have not seen your video yet b/c my network here sucks... : (

w00gy
08-15-2006, 12:04 PM
I'm stringing @ 55 lbs with wilson sensation string. Stringing any lower is not an option. I have done this before. My normal strokes fly and my strokes in the run will fall deep. This means i would be more prone to making faults in a casual rally than i'm with this setup.

The video is not me playing fed so you're not missing out that much ;)

Ultra2HolyGrail
08-15-2006, 12:29 PM
Woogy if you want to really improve you must take lessons and a lot of drills. ALOT of players i know have very bad habits which will last their lifetime all because they diddnt learn from a pro..

Keifers
08-15-2006, 06:24 PM
I'm stringing @ 55 lbs with wilson sensation string. Stringing any lower is not an option. I have done this before. My normal strokes fly and my strokes in the run will fall deep. This means i would be more prone to making faults in a casual rally than i'm with this setup.

The video is not me playing fed so you're not missing out that much ;)
I have a couple of PS 85s. Wilson Sensation is not a string I would put in them -- it's really quite a dull, almost dead-feeling, string, imo. There are many strings that would provide you with a much more lively stringbed response AND give you better spin and control, even if you stayed at 55 lbs. NRG2 and X-One are two that come to mind. (Even PSG Original would play more lively, I reckon.)

That said, taking some lessons from a good pro would probably be money well spent at this stage in your tennis "career".

Regarding a different racquet, perhaps your pro could make some suggestions after he has seen you hit. Be sure to demo, demo, demo -- as much as you can before you buy.

Good luck.

w00gy
08-16-2006, 02:14 PM
Thanx,

I'm demoing some older model of the nCode nVision an a head t.i. heat. Don't know what to expect. I'm hitting the court again tommorrow.

After that 'm going back to my old shop. I've moved to the capitol of hollan, Amsterdam, yet there is nog specialty shop to be found anywhere near here!! :S
Don't even have the nSix-One models nor a current dunlop nor a current head nor Folkl nor.....

About the string. Hated it from the first minute of play. Still waiting for it to break............. sigh ( I'm not rich enough to have them cut out)

Starwind
08-16-2006, 02:25 PM
Unless you are a college or pro player, I don't think you should use the 6.0. It's such a ridiculously demanding racquet.

Ultra2HolyGrail
08-16-2006, 03:11 PM
A larger head racquet can be demanding to, especially for control and accuracy.

Redflea
08-16-2006, 04:14 PM
You should not be using a PS 6.0 85...makes no sense at your level, other than for fun. I wouldn't even use it for "training" purposes if I were you.

Your game will progress faster and you will benefit more from using a racquet more appropriate to your experience and skillset. 100 or so head size, weight that you can swing well for three full sets, power level appropriate to your swing style/strength.

There are a lot of great racquets that you could use, and wouldn't be anywhere near as demanding to do well with as your current stick. If you like a flexy feel, look for mid-plus (98-105) head sizes with flex numbers in the lower to mid 60's. I guarantee you will be a happier camper after the switch and will see improved results.

drakulie
08-16-2006, 04:41 PM
Well if you could swing the PD ok as you posted, then the PS 85 should not be a problem. Contrary to what others might say the PD has a heavier swingweight (342) than the PS 85 (329). The problem is most likely your technique, and mechanics. A tweener racquet with a larger "sweetspot" may alleviate this temporarily.

Redflea
08-16-2006, 04:46 PM
The head size is the most significant issue that needs correction...an 85 vs. 100 is night-and-day difference. Heck, a 90 vs. 98 has a significant affect, I know, I just switched from my RDX Mid 90 (a very forgiving mid) to a Dunlop 98 and that difference is very noticeable to me in all aspects of my game.

He could end up w/the same swingweight, no big deal if he can handle it. He should not stay w/the 85 head size...

Janne
08-16-2006, 04:54 PM
Is there a big difference in a 85 and a 90 si. head size and a 90 to 95 si. head size regarding sweetspot?

NoBadMojo
08-16-2006, 07:24 PM
Well if you could swing the PD ok as you posted, then the PS 85 should not be a problem. Contrary to what others might say the PD has a heavier swingweight (342) than the PS 85 (329). The problem is most likely your technique, and mechanics. A tweener racquet with a larger "sweetspot" may alleviate this temporarily.

most people have the ability to look up the swingweights of racquets. actually the technique required to make an obsolete old frame like the ps85 work is also obsolete old technique thus making this old obsolete frame even more obsolete. you are also incorrect that having a larger sweetspot...one that a person car reliably hit... is only a temporary fix.

Redflea
08-16-2006, 09:59 PM
Is there a big difference in a 85 and a 90 si. head size and a 90 to 95 si. head size regarding sweetspot?

Janne...Depends on the racquets, as sweetspot size varies by size and construction/materials, etc. The overall "friendliness factors" of a racquet include sweetspot size, how they handle off-center shots, whether the sweet spot is centered or biased towards 12 or 6, etc.

Two personal "fer instances:" My experience with the PS 6.0 85 and the Yonex RDX Mid 90 was that the PS 6.0 85 was much more challenging than the RDX. I found less difference between the RDX Mid 90 and the PS 6.0 95.

w00gy
08-17-2006, 03:32 AM
Hi all,

i've played again today and tested 2 frames. First was an nVision. Not like the one on TW site but different. Probably recreational. This frame was one big dissapointment. I thought I would get more power but i didn't. My server were slower, groundstrokes, slices, topspin, flat, you name it. everything was less. Touch was ok but I quickly found myself hitting looping topspin balls to get any type of depth. Also stability was quistionable on offcenter hits.

Then tested a 2nd racquet. a Head t.i heat ( has a stabilizing bar in the throat). This one hit fairly nice feelings wise but also gave me less speed and heavy balls. With this racquet i also quickly noticed the pure lack of mass behind the ball.

Of course finally I picked up my PS and everything fell in to place again. There was some doubt but now it's official: "MORE WEIGHT MATTERS TO ME".

Yes it's heavy, yes it's low powered but it did wonders on my strokes. I was consistently hitting heavy balls again. Touch was ok. My game was back.

I've brought the 2 demo's back to the big retailer and went to the specialty shop( wilson only:rolleyes: ) near the club i play at. They told me to test the nBlade, nPro and nTour the next time I'm playing. They were closest to the PS and were also "Player/match" frames. I held all 3 of them, twisted and swung a litte. The nPro and nTour felt pretty comfy as a first impression. nBlade just felt real heavy......

I'll keep you informed in the next week

neo
08-17-2006, 04:55 AM
actually the technique required to make an obsolete old frame like the ps85 work is also obsolete old technique thus making this old obsolete frame even more obsolete.

So, you think Sampras's technique is obsolete? How about Federer's? Whatever frame he is using now he used PS85 just four years ago.

FH2FH
08-17-2006, 05:05 AM
I agree with most others about the headsize. In your original post you wanted more power. It won't hurt to have more juice from your racquet. Maybe the mistakes we've made so far is asking you to get a lighter racquet. If you like the weight (stability, bigger sweetspot, etc), then you need a bigger headsize. Or you can add lead to the head of your frame. Try a Prince Original Graphite Oversized or some of the other "heavy" racquets over the 12+ oz range. Some people also like the Kinetic G series racquets for tennis elbow, etc.

NoBadMojo
08-17-2006, 06:05 AM
So, you think Sampras's technique is obsolete? How about Federer's? Whatever frame he is using now he used PS85 just four years ago.

sampras is retired and the game has changed even since he has left not so long ago and i suggest that none of us here at the forum are quite as good as federer, as no one on the pro tour is even as good as federer. so if people think they are better than federer by using a frame even more demanding than what federer uses, well then.....awwww nevermind

Keifers
08-17-2006, 08:08 AM
Is there a big difference in a 85 and a 90 si. head size and a 90 to 95 si. head size regarding sweetspot?
If I can answer your question in terms of how often mishits occur...

My experience has been that 90" frames (such as PS Tour 90, RDX 500 Mid) are no different in terms of number of mishits than 95" or larger racquets (such as PS 6.0 95, n6.1 95, MW 200G, PK Type R, and many others).

Wrt 85", the following has been my experience (and I make no claims that anyone else will have the same):

Last year, I demoed the 6.0 85 from TW and loved everything about it except that I was framing a lot of shots, especially on returns of serve. I was disappointed; I sent the demo back and put the 85 out of my mind.

This year, I gave the 85 another go and, remarkably, the number of times I mishit with it was dramatically lower, in fact, not noticeably different from using 90+" frames. Why? I can't really say. Perhaps (probably?) I'm seeing the ball better, with more focus, whatever...

I can say that I'm having a really good time playing with the 85. For me, it's not for every day because its weight and swingweight are definitely on the high side. But when I can wield it well, playing with it is immensely satisfying -- I hit shots that I've never hit with any other racquet. The translation from my intention on any given shot to the reality of where and how the ball goes is very direct indeed. It's a blast.

Janne
08-17-2006, 08:29 AM
If I can answer your question in terms of how often mishits occur...

My experience has been that 90" frames (such as PS Tour 90, RDX 500 Mid) are no different in terms of number of mishits than 95" or larger racquets (such as PS 6.0 95, n6.1 95, MW 200G, PK Type R, and many others).

Wrt 85", the following has been my experience (and I make no claims that anyone else will have the same):

Last year, I demoed the 6.0 85 from TW and loved everything about it except that I was framing a lot of shots, especially on returns of serve. I was disappointed; I sent the demo back and put the 85 out of my mind.

This year, I gave the 85 another go and, remarkably, the number of times I mishit with it was dramatically lower, in fact, not noticeably different from using 90+" frames. Why? I can't really say. Perhaps (probably?) I'm seeing the ball better, with more focus, whatever...

I can say that I'm having a really good time playing with the 85. For me, it's not for every day because its weight and swingweight are definitely on the high side. But when I can wield it well, playing with it is immensely satisfying -- I hit shots that I've never hit with any other racquet. The translation from my intention on any given shot to the reality of where and how the ball goes is very direct indeed. It's a blast.

Thanks for the answer.

Arafel
08-17-2006, 08:38 AM
most people have the ability to look up the swingweights of racquets. actually the technique required to make an obsolete old frame like the ps85 work is also obsolete old technique thus making this old obsolete frame even more obsolete. you are also incorrect that having a larger sweetspot...one that a person car reliably hit... is only a temporary fix.

NBM, just out of curiosity, and I don't mean any disrespect, but WHY exactly do you think technique is for the PS85 is out of date? More important, what do you think makes "modern" technique superior to "obsolete" technique.

You go on a lot about how superior modern racquets are, but that hasn't been my experience.

I played tennis from 1980-1990 and quit. I started with a Jack Kramer Pro Staff and switched to the Ultra 2 in 84 when Wislon stopped making wood racquets. I played most of juniors and all of college witht the Ultra 2. After college, burnt out and living in New York and not knowing any tennis players, I quit.

I started playing again 2 years ago and looked for a new frame, finally settling on the nCode 6.1 Tour 90. I was mostly pretty happy with it. Then last month, for kicks more than anything, I bought an Ultra 2 off of ****. From the moment I first hit with it, I remember what I had missed with the Tour 90. I'm loving playing with the Ultra 2 so much I'm looking for another one.

As for technique, I feel that I can do most of the things I could do with the Tour 90. I can still whip the racquet head for topspin. Heck, I can do that with wood racquets too. I find the Ultra 2 gives my backhand more pop and I have more control.

Just so you know, when I first started playing again I tried a few other racquets, like the n6.1 95, the Hammer 98, the Wilson Hammer Skunk. I HATED the newer and bigger racquets. It felt like I had no control. Holding lighter racquets makes me feel like I'm swinging air and that I have no feedback from the racquet or control over the shots.

I've also hit with a Babolat PD and a Prince Diablo. Felt the same way about those racquets.

You advocate changing your technique for the newer racquets; WHY? I don't see any advantage to "new" technique over "old" technique. I especially don't understand why players have been encouraged to change their playing style to meet new racquets instead of having the manufacturers make racquets that conform to how the game can be played with less risk of injury. But I guess that's just me.

warreng
08-17-2006, 09:21 AM
If I could make a suggestion or even if anyone else can provide feedback on this?

Would a Prostaff Classic 6.1 95 be less demanding than the PS 6.0 85? What about the current nSix-One?

Maybe you could give those racquets a whirl. I own a PSC 6.1 and although it's pretty hefty, I hit solid groundstrokes with it...

anirut
08-17-2006, 09:21 AM
Arafel, I'm not NMBJ, but I think the reason NBMJ suggested with "going modern" is because ...

Today's comepetitive game has changed alot. If you're playing competitive tennis and don't have the genius of Fed, playing against the younger generation, then you'll probably know what I mean.

If you're not playing to earn your meal, then anything should work fine. And, for the general public, lighter, big-headed rackets are easier to play and grow with. Of course, once someone passes a certain learning curve, he/she will know what kind of racket would be best for one's style.

We're proabably in the same age group. I also use old school strokes, heavy, small-headed rackets. I enjoy these rackets more than the modern ones too. But when I "try" to play with very "well-trained" young guys, I'm dead. Yes, I did try turning my body-clock back 20 years to play with them, with all that speed and power of the past, I could last for only about 20 minutes.

Hope I made some sense here.

Ultra2HolyGrail
08-17-2006, 10:13 AM
I wonder if a one handed backhand would be a obsolete stroke too? Tell that to the worlds number1 and that his racquet is also obsolete. lol

Ultra2HolyGrail
08-17-2006, 10:16 AM
Arafel, I'm not NMBJ, but I think the reason NBMJ suggested with "going modern" is because ...


Thats what he uses, plain and simple.

a guy
08-17-2006, 10:21 AM
You should go for a racket with a larger headsize so you can get your strokes together and gain some confidence. I bet all these people who are "pushing you around" are using these types of rackets :p

I think the Pro staff range is for more intermediate players and they'll punish bad technique as such so you need some thing more forgiving to compliment your strokes.

Ultra2HolyGrail
08-17-2006, 10:31 AM
You should go for a racket with a larger headsize so you can get your strokes together and gain some confidence.

A larger racquet wont help with strokes and technique or confidence. Only lessons and drills and correction from a pro is the only way to improve.

Arafel
08-17-2006, 11:27 AM
Arafel, I'm not NMBJ, but I think the reason NBMJ suggested with "going modern" is because ...

Today's comepetitive game has changed alot. If you're playing competitive tennis and don't have the genius of Fed, playing against the younger generation, then you'll probably know what I mean.

If you're not playing to earn your meal, then anything should work fine. And, for the general public, lighter, big-headed rackets are easier to play and grow with. Of course, once someone passes a certain learning curve, he/she will know what kind of racket would be best for one's style.

We're proabably in the same age group. I also use old school strokes, heavy, small-headed rackets. I enjoy these rackets more than the modern ones too. But when I "try" to play with very "well-trained" young guys, I'm dead. Yes, I did try turning my body-clock back 20 years to play with them, with all that speed and power of the past, I could last for only about 20 minutes.

Hope I made some sense here.

Well, I play in Open-level tournaments here against women 16-20 years my junior. I don't find that using a smaller, heavier racquet hurts my game against them at all. In fact, since switching back to the Ultra 2, I find that I have more confidence than at any time since I started playing again.

What hurts me is the fact that I just can't run as much as I used to without getting tired. I think there is a difference between racquet arm fatigue, which I've never experience, even playing an occasional 5 set match for practice, vs. winded fatigue, which I do experience.

Arafel
08-17-2006, 11:28 AM
A larger racquet wont help with strokes and technique or confidence. Only lessons and drills and correction from a pro is the only way to improve.

Love your User ID!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Redflea
08-17-2006, 12:36 PM
A larger racquet wont help with strokes and technique or confidence. Only lessons and drills and correction from a pro is the only way to improve.

Absolutely it will...put the right racquet in a person's hand (weight/SW, head size, flex, grip size, etc.) and their ability to execute the proper technique, their results, and their confidence will all be significantly better than if they hit/take lessons w/one that is too heavy, too small head size, etc.

I wouldn't teach my son to drive in my Ferrari, too much car for a beginner. He'll learn in the minivan!

drakulie
08-17-2006, 02:11 PM
NBM, just out of curiosity, and I don't mean any disrespect, but WHY exactly do you think technique is for the PS85 is out of date? More important, what do you think makes "modern" technique superior to "obsolete" technique.

You go on a lot about how superior modern racquets are, but that hasn't been my experience.

I played tennis from 1980-1990 and quit. I started with a Jack Kramer Pro Staff and switched to the Ultra 2 in 84 when Wislon stopped making wood racquets. I played most of juniors and all of college witht the Ultra 2. After college, burnt out and living in New York and not knowing any tennis players, I quit.

I started playing again 2 years ago and looked for a new frame, finally settling on the nCode 6.1 Tour 90. I was mostly pretty happy with it. Then last month, for kicks more than anything, I bought an Ultra 2 off of ****. From the moment I first hit with it, I remember what I had missed with the Tour 90. I'm loving playing with the Ultra 2 so much I'm looking for another one.

As for technique, I feel that I can do most of the things I could do with the Tour 90. I can still whip the racquet head for topspin. Heck, I can do that with wood racquets too. I find the Ultra 2 gives my backhand more pop and I have more control.

Just so you know, when I first started playing again I tried a few other racquets, like the n6.1 95, the Hammer 98, the Wilson Hammer Skunk. I HATED the newer and bigger racquets. It felt like I had no control. Holding lighter racquets makes me feel like I'm swinging air and that I have no feedback from the racquet or control over the shots.

I've also hit with a Babolat PD and a Prince Diablo. Felt the same way about those racquets.

You advocate changing your technique for the newer racquets; WHY? I don't see any advantage to "new" technique over "old" technique. I especially don't understand why players have been encouraged to change their playing style to meet new racquets instead of having the manufacturers make racquets that conform to how the game can be played with less risk of injury. But I guess that's just me.

Thanks, I couldn't have said it better myself. NBMJ is just full of hot air. Without proper technique I don't care how big, light, or "improved" the racquet is. Bottom line, you have to meet the ball square. One thing that has not changed is the racquet face has to meet the ball square, regardless of technology or "new technique".

drakulie
08-17-2006, 02:13 PM
Well, I play in Open-level tournaments here against women 16-20 years my junior. I don't find that using a smaller, heavier racquet hurts my game against them at all. In fact, since switching back to the Ultra 2, I find that I have more confidence than at any time since I started playing again.

What hurts me is the fact that I just can't run as much as I used to without getting tired. I think there is a difference between racquet arm fatigue, which I've never experience, even playing an occasional 5 set match for practice, vs. winded fatigue, which I do experience.

Nicely put.

a guy
08-17-2006, 02:14 PM
Absolutely it will...put the right racquet in a person's hand (weight/SW, head size, flex, grip size, etc.) and their ability to execute the proper technique, their results, and their confidence will all be significantly better than if they hit/take lessons w/one that is too heavy, too small head size, etc.

I wouldn't teach my son to drive in my Ferrari, too much car for a beginner. He'll learn in the minivan!

Exactly right. Also enjoying tennis and getting better results breeds confidence.

drakulie
08-17-2006, 02:15 PM
Absolutely it will...put the right racquet in a person's hand (weight/SW, head size, flex, grip size, etc.) and their ability to execute the proper technique, their results, and their confidence will all be significantly better than if they hit/take lessons w/one that is too heavy, too small head size, etc. I wouldn't teach my son to drive in my Ferrari, too much car for a beginner. He'll learn in the minivan!

Thanks for calling the old racquets Ferraris, and new ones Mini Vans.

calabi12
08-17-2006, 02:45 PM
Some of the earlier advice you got was solid. This old fashioned heavy racquet may not be the best for you right now. It is still a very good racquet but I suggest you wait till you are about 3.5 or 4.0.

For now, find a racquet approximately 10.5 to 11.5 oz strung and preferably head light. Avoid very stiff racquets. There are lots of excellent racquets in this range.

Also, as suggested by some people over here, invest in some coaching. You can save money by taking a few lessons focused on correcting and "perfecting" your strokes, and then use a machine and/or a hitting partner to grove in your new strokes. Later on you can go back to the coach for some finer tuning.

Once your mechanics are pretty good, you can go back and try the 12.0 oz and over racquets.

If you still feel like you need that heft right now, I suggest you try the Flexpoint Radical Tour or Prestige. They are some of the "lightest" 12.0 oz racquets I have used and are both modern and very good. Lots of heft. They feel light probably because they are so head light.

My 2 cents.

BreakPoint
08-17-2006, 03:11 PM
I wouldn't teach my son to drive in my Ferrari, too much car for a beginner. He'll learn in the minivan!

Well, I'm not sure the minivan is the easiest to thing to learn how to drive on, either. Imagine trying to learn how to parallel park for the first time in something as big as a minivan! :eek: I know I for one would have failed the driving test. ;) LOL Probably something like a Honda Civic would be much easier. :D Same with racquets, I don't think one needs to start off with the biggest and/or lightest racquet on the shelf. Something more reasonable could work, too.

neo
08-17-2006, 03:20 PM
sampras is retired and the game has changed even since he has left not so long ago and i suggest that none of us here at the forum are quite as good as federer, as no one on the pro tour is even as good as federer. so if people think they are better than federer by using a frame even more demanding than what federer uses, well then.....awwww nevermind

You appear to be confused, so I will take you through this step by step:

1. You said obsolete frame (PS85) requires obsolete technique.
2. I asked you if you think Federer has obsolete technique since he used that frame at least until quite recently.

Can you answer that question? And please consider that true but irrelevant statement like "none of us here at the forum are quite as good as federer" is not an answer to the question.

Redflea
08-17-2006, 04:31 PM
Well, I'm not sure the minivan is the easiest to thing to learn how to drive on, either. Imagine trying to learn how to parallel park for the first time in something as big as a minivan! :eek: I know I for one would have failed the driving test. LOL Probably something like a Honda Civic would be much easier. :D Same with racquets, I don't think one needs to start off with the biggest and/or lightest racquet on the shelf. Something more reasonable could work, too.

Heh heh...

I learned in a Volkswagon Van...four speed shift w/the impossible-to-figure-out-what-gear-you-are-in shift-linkage! So if my son can't learn in our modern, automatic, "drives like a car" minivan, then HE'LL NEVER DRIVE!! ;)

Redflea
08-17-2006, 04:35 PM
Thanks for calling the old racquets Ferraris, and new ones Mini Vans.

Actually, the DNX Mid (just released) is a Ferrari as well, under my analogy. :)

I like the old and the new equally - my only set-in-stone bias is that Root Beer floats are the greatest dessert ever created, period.

drakulie
08-17-2006, 04:41 PM
my only set-in-stone bias is that Root Beer floats are the greatest dessert ever created, period.

Too funny!

newnuse
08-17-2006, 11:53 PM
Yeah what the hell is this new technique people talk about. The vast majority of people I see do not hit like Nadal.

Some people hit with lots of spin, some hit flatter, some hit with a close stance, some hit with a more open stance...that has always been the case.

What the he## is an obosolete technique??? Is there a new rule put out by the USTA banning certain strokes I don't know about????

newnuse
08-17-2006, 11:56 PM
Nice posts Arafel,

The racket you enjoy playing with the most will yield the best results for you. You will enjoy playing more, you will be more motivated to go out and play.

You are best at what you enjoying doing right?

As for picking up a few more Ultra2... those are tough to come by. Good luck with the hunt. How do you like the ProStaff 85? You can still buy those new.

Arafel
08-18-2006, 06:45 AM
Nice posts Arafel,

The racket you enjoy playing with the most will yield the best results for you. You will enjoy playing more, you will be more motivated to go out and play.

You are best at what you enjoying doing right?

As for picking up a few more Ultra2... those are tough to come by. Good luck with the hunt. How do you like the ProStaff 85? You can still buy those new.

PS 85 is a nice stick. I played with it once last year, just out of curiosity. When I first switched in 84 to graphite from wood, I tried both the Ultra 2 and the PS85. I really wanted to prefer the PS85, because my two favorite players, Connors and Evert, were using it. But the Ultra 2 just seemed a little more suited to my baseline-oriented game. I especially notice it on my backhand, especially going down the line.

I do prefer the PS85 at the net. I'm thinking of picking up a PS85 for doubles and using the U2 for singles. I think the U2 is a little stiffer because of the boron, and the balance is a little different, as the PS85 is more headlight.

drakulie
08-18-2006, 07:01 AM
" Too demanding you say? Judge me by size you do? Too small for you I am? Cut your feet off I will…..with my PS 85 I will. Against your defenses hit volleys, and killer angles I will”.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v736/drakulie/yodalone02.jpg

Mick
08-18-2006, 07:47 AM
the PS 6.0 85 maybe is too demanding to play with but not the PS 6.0 95. It plays fine to me.

Keifers
08-18-2006, 03:26 PM
I warmed up with and played a couple of sets with my n6.1 95 18x20 today. And then switched to a PS 85. Definitely noticed the need to focus more on the ball when using the 85. The 95 just has a bigger margin of error -- I could pay less attention and still be OK.

Btw, the n6.1 95 is certainly a solid, powerful player's racquet. But compared with the 6.0 85, its feel is almost nonexistent -- this is a huge difference between the two frames; I can't really think of them being in the same family of sticks. My arm and shoulder didn't like the n6.1; they feel just a little stiff and sore right now (which nevers happens with the 6.0).

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 06:03 PM
Well, I play in Open-level tournaments here against women 16-20 years my junior. I don't find that using a smaller, heavier racquet hurts my game against them at all. In fact, since switching back to the Ultra 2, I find that I have more confidence than at any time since I started playing again.

What hurts me is the fact that I just can't run as much as I used to without getting tired. I think there is a difference between racquet arm fatigue, which I've never experience, even playing an occasional 5 set match for practice, vs. winded fatigue, which I do experience.

you my wish to consider that you are winded and fatigued because you are swinging a too demanding frame. it is quite normal for your racquet arm to not feel tired at the end of a match, but the trying to make a frame too demanding for you work can show up in the form of no legs and no wind left at the end....thats what frames which are too demanding do to people....doesnt take much..that extra half ounce or so

Arafel
08-18-2006, 06:08 PM
you my wish to consider that you are winded and fatigued because you are swinging a too demanding frame. it is quite normal for your racquet arm to not feel tired at the end of a match, but the trying to make a frame too demanding for you work can show up in the form of no legs and no wind left at the end....thats what frames which are too demanding do to people....doesnt take much..that extra half ounce or so

Um, sorry, but that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. Because the racquet is too heavy I'm winded when I'm running around the court?

I'm winded because I'm doing sprints against women half my age. But even the winded part is usually temporary, after say a demanding point.

Now, if we were talking about me using heavier sneakers, that would make sense, because then my legs would have to work harder. But my legs don't have to work harder because I'm using a 13 ounce frame instead of an 11-12 ounce frame.

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 06:23 PM
Thats what he uses, plain and simple.

i see..nice logic there..what a ridiculously wrong comment

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 06:24 PM
Um, sorry, but that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. Because the racquet is too heavy I'm winded when I'm running around the court?

I'm winded because I'm doing sprints against women half my age. But even the winded part is usually temporary, after say a demanding point.

Now, if we were talking about me using heavier sneakers, that would make sense, because then my legs would have to work harder. But my legs don't have to work harder because I'm using a 13 ounce frame instead of an 11-12 ounce frame.

right.it makes no sense to you because you dont understand it

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 06:27 PM
Thanks, I couldn't have said it better myself. NBMJ is just full of hot air. Without proper technique I don't care how big, light, or "improved" the racquet is. Bottom line, you have to meet the ball square. One thing that has not changed is the racquet face has to meet the ball square, regardless of technology or "new technique".

you dont know what you are talking about. you clearly dont understand the relationship between gear and technique

drakulie
08-18-2006, 06:32 PM
you my wish to consider that you are winded and fatigued because you are swinging a too demanding frame. it is quite normal for your racquet arm to not feel tired at the end of a match, but the trying to make a frame too demanding for you work can show up in the form of no legs and no wind left at the end....thats what frames which are too demanding do to people....doesnt take much..that extra half ounce or so

Ummhhh?? Why don't you take your own advice and play with a ping-pong paddle attached to the handle of a fly-swatter? That is a lot lighter than your Volkl DNX987Z42e1.....whatever racquet. I am sure you will generate enormous arm speed with this set up, along with this "new technique" you are always raving about I am sure you will get fantastic results. Best thing is you will never feel fatigued. Good luck!!

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 06:34 PM
You appear to be confused, so I will take you through this step by step:

1. You said obsolete frame (PS85) requires obsolete technique.
2. I asked you if you think Federer has obsolete technique since he used that frame at least until quite recently.

Can you answer that question? And please consider that true but irrelevant statement like "none of us here at the forum are quite as good as federer" is not an answer to the question.

i'm not confused at all..my statement isnt irrelevant because this is not a message board with ANY member who can play like federer, and silly me thinking that this Message bOard contaINS people who wish to learn stuff about tennis and that this entire thread is about this guy saying THE PS85 IS TOO DEMANDING.. FedereR is an anomoly..he';s a freak..the other pros cant even play using the combinations of techniques he uses..Federer is a mixture of old technique and new, with some of hs own unique technique thrown in. hoPe this answers your question

neo
08-18-2006, 06:34 PM
NoBadMojo, sorry I was unnecessarily rude in last comment, factual validity notwithstanding.

I would really like to hear your opinion about how much less demanding do you think PS95 is, compared to PS85? Do you think PS95 is a good choice for today's intermediate player?

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 06:38 PM
NoBadMojo, sorry I was unnecessarily rude in last comment, factual validity notwithstanding.

I would really like to hear your opinion about how much less demanding do you think PS95 is, compared to PS85? Do you think PS95 is a good choice for today's intermediate player?

You were very rude and I didnt appreciate it, but do appreciate you had the courtesy and class to apologize which i accept..thanks.

I havent hit the ps95 so cant comment

drakulie
08-18-2006, 06:39 PM
you clearly dont understand the relationship between gear and technique

Yeah right. Tell that to the poor guy I demolished in a tournament when this photo was taken. By the way, he was playing with a new and improved lighter, stronger, I can't keep up with this guy if I play with my PS 85 Pure Drive. he got his *** whoooped.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v736/drakulie/776c670b.jpg

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 06:42 PM
There seem to be a few of the angry disruntled mid sizers around here who should realize the subect of this thread is 'THE PS85 IS TOO DEMANDING' . This isnt so difficult to discern as the guys sez 'the ps85 is too demanding' in the subject line of his post. so rather than continuing to try and stuff the dinosaur that is the ps85 down peoples gullets, maybe think about being silent since the guy is looking for something OTHER than the ps85....this is too much

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 06:44 PM
Yeah right. Tell that to the poor guy I demolished in a tournament when this photo was taken. By the way, he was playing with a new and improved lighter, stronger, I can't keep up with this guy if I play with my PS 85 Pure Drive. he got his *** whoooped.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v736/drakulie/776c670b.jpg

wha? this guys technique is also very obsolete and wrong and is going to lead to some serious injury down the road..

Arent you the little braggert? good job there

Ultra2HolyGrail
08-18-2006, 06:51 PM
Is a one handed backhand obsolete?

stormholloway
08-18-2006, 07:01 PM
I just ordered a PS 95 6.1 from **** to get a little extra pop. Give that a try dude. Still a classic stick. Pro tennis players use light, oversized racquets so it's not like you're a ***** if you don't use a 6.0. I played with one today and love it but I could use the extra power, especially on serve.

stormholloway
08-18-2006, 07:02 PM
E---B---A---Y... 100 bucks too, brand new.

Arafel
08-18-2006, 07:03 PM
right.it makes no sense to you because you dont understand it

I understand it perfectly. And again I would say you are wrong. I get winded from running sprints. Whether I have an Ultra 2, an nCode 6.1 Tour, or some lightweight tweener stick isn't going to matter.

Try, for once, to set aside your personal predujices for a moment. Think about a point that features two women hitting the ball fairly hard and moving side to side. Even the longest point doesn't go on for much more than a minute. The fatigue that will set in will be from running sprints. No frame is going to fatigue me in the short amount of time in each point.

For the record, I really don't appreciate the rude demeanor you exhibited in your last series of posts. I went out of my way to try to be civil and respectful. I would suggest in the future that you do the same.

Ultra2HolyGrail
08-18-2006, 07:06 PM
Maybe you should demo the dnx9 Arafel :)

drakulie
08-18-2006, 07:10 PM
wha? this guys technique is also very obsolete and wrong and is going to lead to some serious injury down the road..

Arent you the little braggert? good job there


For starters in my first post in this thread I wrote the following:

"Well if you could swing the PD ok as you posted, then the PS 85 should not be a problem. Contrary to what others might say the PD has a heavier swingweight (342) than the PS 85 (329). The problem is most likely your technique, and mechanics. A tweener racquet with a larger "sweetspot" may alleviate this temporarily."

Then you posted this crap:

"most people have the ability to look up the swingweights of racquets. actually the technique required to make an obsolete old frame like the ps85 work is also obsolete old technique thus making this old obsolete frame even more obsolete. you are also incorrect that having a larger sweetspot...one that a person car reliably hit... is only a temporary fix."

Then this crap:

"you dont know what you are talking about. you clearly dont understand the relationship between gear and technique."


You are obviously not a very intelligent individual. Like I advised before, you need to start playing with a ping-pong paddle to go along with your "new technique". Good job indeed!

Arafel
08-18-2006, 07:16 PM
Maybe you should demo the dnx9 Arafel :)

LOL, given your ID, I think you know how that would turn out. I have tried a Vokl; can't remember which frame it was, but it was one of their newer "players" frames. I wasn't that impressed with it.

I've always been a Wilson girl. Don't really see any reason to change that either.

Here's something to ponder. I joined a men's 5.0 ladder recently so I could get matches in against better players and be prepared for the Open tournaments I play. I played a match against someone on the ladder today that went 3 sets. I lost, but it was fun and mostly close. After the match, we played another set. Then I was asked to play this doubles mixer by someone and went over to do that. I had played all 4 singles sets with the U2. Pulled out the n6.1 for doubles, since I wasn't sure how quick I could be with the U2 in net exchanges after 4 sets of competitive singles. For the first 20 minutes or so, I couldn't get over how HUGE the n6.1 Tour looked, and it's only 5 square inches bigger! But it felt unwieldy since the head was bigger. Strange.

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 07:52 PM
I understand it perfectly. And again I would say you are wrong. I get winded from running sprints. Whether I have an Ultra 2, an nCode 6.1 Tour, or some lightweight tweener stick isn't going to matter.

Try, for once, to set aside your personal predujices for a moment. Think about a point that features two women hitting the ball fairly hard and moving side to side. Even the longest point doesn't go on for much more than a minute. The fatigue that will set in will be from running sprints. No frame is going to fatigue me in the short amount of time in each point.

For the record, I really don't appreciate the rude demeanor you exhibited in your last series of posts. I went out of my way to try to be civil and respectful. I would suggest in the future that you do the same.

i havent been rude and disresepctful..on the contrary guys like the poster who apologized have been, and no you are..at least he apologized.

i know about playin younger people and i know about playing with heavy racquets and know what swinging too much swingweight does..it kills your legs and your wind..i cant help it you dont understand this...you just arent understanding this so you seem to be angry and lashing out ..i suggest you check your own package before calling me stuff like this..it's not very nice of you

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 07:54 PM
You are obviously not a very intelligent individual.

nice one there..another angry bent up poster .... this is very unecessary of you..

NoBadMojo
08-18-2006, 07:55 PM
Maybe you should demo the dnx9 Arafel :)

very very childish thing to say for sure..guess you showed me

drakulie
08-18-2006, 08:11 PM
nice one there..another angry bent up poster .... this is very unecessary of you..

Don't mention it. It's understanding that makes it possible for people like us to tolerate a person like yourself.

Nice comeback.

Keifers
08-18-2006, 08:38 PM
Well, I play in Open-level tournaments here against women 16-20 years my junior. I don't find that using a smaller, heavier racquet hurts my game against them at all. In fact, since switching back to the Ultra 2, I find that I have more confidence than at any time since I started playing again.

What hurts me is the fact that I just can't run as much as I used to without getting tired. I think there is a difference between racquet arm fatigue, which I've never experience, even playing an occasional 5 set match for practice, vs. winded fatigue, which I do experience.
you my wish to consider that you are winded and fatigued because you are swinging a too demanding frame. it is quite normal for your racquet arm to not feel tired at the end of a match, but the trying to make a frame too demanding for you work can show up in the form of no legs and no wind left at the end....thats what frames which are too demanding do to people....doesnt take much..that extra half ounce or so
Um, sorry, but that makes absolutely no sense whatsoever. Because the racquet is too heavy I'm winded when I'm running around the court?

I'm winded because I'm doing sprints against women half my age. But even the winded part is usually temporary, after say a demanding point.

Now, if we were talking about me using heavier sneakers, that would make sense, because then my legs would have to work harder. But my legs don't have to work harder because I'm using a 13 ounce frame instead of an 11-12 ounce frame.
right.it makes no sense to you because you dont understand it
PRICELESS!!!...

w00gy
08-19-2006, 02:08 AM
I just ordered a PS 95 6.1 from **** to get a little extra pop. Give that a try dude. Still a classic stick. Pro tennis players use light, oversized racquets so it's not like you're a ***** if you don't use a 6.0. I played with one today and love it but I could use the extra power, especially on serve.

Thanx! Let me know what your finding's are. I must say i'm not a fan of buying online or not demo'ing. I 'm going to demo the nPro in a 30 mins. But by sheer swinging the racquet i know i'm gonna have a hard time adjusting to it.

NoBadMojo
08-19-2006, 05:49 AM
PRICELESS!!!...

you're really looking at things through a distorted lens if you think what i said was rude....i suggested what was happening to her because i have lots of experiences in these things and you make it into some monumental thing..talk about priceless..it's you just being a vulture and looking to jump me for any possible little thing...that pretty sad that you waste everyones' time to post on some perceved and trivial wording i did which you interpret somehow as rude..check your package and also educucate yourself about this stuff before atacking me for offering solid advice....what an insignificant thing to criticze someone about....sad that's what you think you got on me and it is worthy of yet another attack on me by you....

you weak frail chldren may dominate this thread as well, but know that the original poster was asking for advice because his frame was too demanding, rather than be told he must force the ps85 to work..poor guy probably bought the ps85 to begin with by getting really bad advice here on the forum and was told really wrong things like how if he would just buy this frame he would learn to hit with good technique..talk about rude and ignorant.....have fun attacking in this thread..i'd like to pass on my participation here and leave it in the hands of all you disgruntled frail ego laden obsolete frame users..attack away..i wont be looking

drakulie
08-19-2006, 06:15 AM
but know that the original poster was asking for advice because his frame was too demanding, rather than be told he must force the ps85 to work..

You mean the same way you attacked me when I posted this thread:

"Well if you could swing the PD ok as you posted, then the PS 85 should not be a problem. Contrary to what others might say the PD has a heavier swingweight (342) than the PS 85 (329). The problem is most likely your technique, and mechanics. A tweener racquet with a larger "sweetspot" may alleviate this temporarily."

Then you posted this crap:

"most people have the ability to look up the swingweights of racquets. actually the technique required to make an obsolete old frame like the ps85 work is also obsolete old technique thus making this old obsolete frame even more obsolete. you are also incorrect that having a larger sweetspot...one that a person car reliably hit... is only a temporary fix."

Then this crap:

"you dont know what you are talking about. you clearly dont understand the relationship between gear and technique."

Like you even know me to post the above. Good luck with your volklswagen dnx9xze36ta@87n whatever obsolete nothing racquet you use.

newnuse
08-19-2006, 11:38 AM
nice job Mojo, another thread hijacked

Dude you really need to let the anger go... you need to realize your way is not the only way.... some people just like smaller heads... some like heavier rackets.... and some play better with them

BTW, Was Sampras just lucky when he was kicking Andre's arse using the 85" and his obsolete strokes? Andre's strokes and racket were much more modern as I recall............ Let me guess, Sampras was just a freak ...just like Federer.

Arafel
08-24-2006, 01:24 PM
Nice posts Arafel,

The racket you enjoy playing with the most will yield the best results for you. You will enjoy playing more, you will be more motivated to go out and play.

You are best at what you enjoying doing right?

As for picking up a few more Ultra2... those are tough to come by. Good luck with the hunt. How do you like the ProStaff 85? You can still buy those new.

Well, I was able to pick up another one this week on e b a y! So, now I've got two very good condition Ultra 2s with matching grip sizes. That's the hardest part; I see more U2s in the 4 1/2 and 4 5/8 than the 4 3/8, which is what I play with.

I'm not a string breaker, so 2 should be fine, and I will still carry my nCode Tour 90s as well. I like using them in doubles, and if I were to ever break strings on both my U2s I'd at least have a pretty good racquet that I've used a lot.

newnuse
08-24-2006, 01:28 PM
Good for you Arafel,

Mind me asking how much you picked it up for? I'm hoping to add one to my collection one of these days...

some rackets I'm still hoping to add POG, Ultra2, Prince Boron, Rossignol 200 and a few more

Arafel
08-24-2006, 01:35 PM
Adding old racquets can be fun. I've got a Kramer Pro Staff and Chris Evert Autograph that I like to pull out and use sometimes. I've also considered getting an old Dunlop Max 200G.

I got this U2, a St. Vincent, for $124 plus shipping. I got the first one for $103 plus shipping. I usually see Ultra 2's go for between $100 and $130 on the big auction site, though sometimes someone will get lucky and get one for around $90. There's one up there now with a 4 5/8 grip.

It's also worth checking Tennis 4 All. I've seen a few there. Good luck in the hunt!

I remember the Rossi F200. I knew a few people who swore by that racquet back in the day. The Prince's were never popular where I played. Good luck! I think it's fun tracking down the old classics.

newnuse
08-24-2006, 01:42 PM
It's amazing how much some old rackets go for.

I shocked you mentioned the Prince rackets were not popular in your area. Back in the 80's, Princes were very popular in SoCal. The POG was huge. They had a few fairly popular models. I recall them being almost as popular as Wilson back then.

Arafel
08-24-2006, 01:49 PM
It's amazing how much some old rackets go for.

I shocked you mentioned the Prince rackets were not popular in your area. Back in the 80's, Princes were very popular in SoCal. The POG was huge. They had a few fairly popular models. I recall them being almost as popular as Wilson back then.

In New York, I saw many more Wilson, Head, Rossignol and Dunlop than Prince among juniors. Prince were derided as "old lady" racquets, because at least initially that's who used them most often.

w00gy
09-11-2006, 11:12 AM
Hi all,

Just came back from my first lesson. I finally found the right level of lessons.
This also was the first time i've played with my new hybrid stringjob.
Former specs:
PS 6.0 / tournagrip over leather grip / Wilson sensation @ 55 lbs

New specs:
PS 6.0 / tournagrip over leather grip /
Babolat pro hurricane in the mains. @ 55 lb
Technifibre synthetic gut in the crosses. @ 55 lbs

I'm not sure what to think of it. The added power was very welcome. I was able to swing a little less agressive thus giving me some more rest and time to focus on good preparation. I did enjoy this alot and i it made clear i could use some extra pop. My backhands were good and penetrating which is the way i want them to be.

What i didn't like was the almost tweener like feel. I've lost a significant amount of control. Some of my normal winners were flying long.... 10-15 cm. So that i'm able to correct but the overal feel was alot less pleasant than I had expected. The face of the strings felt a bit slippery.... I also wasn't able to get my normal spin on the ball which'll cost me some time to adjust to. What can be said is that with every new string i try, I don't seem to be able to put as much spin on the ball. This is something i find weird...

I'm now thinking about a fed like hybrid. With the poly on the crosses and a (synthetic) gut in the mains.

I have a feeling i'm on to something....

I'll keep you informed.

Cheers

neo
09-11-2006, 03:04 PM
Pro hurricane will cut through soft Technifibre synthetic gut in no time.