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maverick1
08-27-2006, 06:38 PM
The title pretty much says it.
They are typically slices from the opponent that I reach comfortably, a little behind the service line. I feel I should take control of the point, but I lose more points than I win from there.

Any attempt to hit topspin results in contact near the bottom of the frame.
I am afraid of hitting long when I hit up without topspin, so I end up pushing the ball slowly without too much spin. I have to hit it to the opponent's weak side in order avoid serious trouble. If I slice it, the result is worse than no spin - it goes up too high and lands short anyway.

What shot should I develop for this situation?

Ironically this shot is easier when the ball is deep. I can take a swing without worrying about hitting long, and I am not moving far( & back) from my neutral position near the center of the baseline.

theartoftennis
08-27-2006, 06:45 PM
Depth > Pace in this situation.

This is more of an offensive shot, considering you're closer to where you want to be, so topspin is really effective here. If you want to hit topspin here, you really want to get low and under the ball so you do not miss-hit. If you're forced to go under the ball, then it's either your footwork or your reflexes. Once you see the ball going to land short, pounce on it. Remember to never go deep crosscourt. Always angle it off or set up your volley going down the line.

KennyNguyen
08-27-2006, 06:54 PM
Remember to never go deep crosscourt.

It's a shot with higher risk, but that doesn't mean you should [i]never[/] go for it. :)

maverick1
08-27-2006, 07:07 PM
Depth > Pace in this situation.

OK. I don't have enough control yet to aim deep, but I can work on it.


This is more of an offensive shot, considering you're closer to where you want to be, so topspin is really effective here. If you want to hit topspin here, you really want to get low and under the ball so you do not miss-hit.


I just don't see topspin being possible on these low balls. I want to say they are 1 foot high, but I am not sure. There is just not enough room under the ball to accelerate the racket upwards. When I try topspin, I make contact with the bottom part of the head.


If you're forced to go under the ball, then it's either your footwork or your reflexes. Once you see the ball going to land short, pounce on it.


I am talking about balls that I reach comfortably. This one opponent was very good with his low slices. Tha ball never got up high enough to hit topspin


Remember to never go deep crosscourt. Always angle it off or set up your volley going down the line.
I can try this.

So you are suggesting low pace, either deep down the line or short angle cross court.

Kevo
08-27-2006, 07:47 PM
These are tough shots to deal with. I remember one match last season where I can pretty much attribute my loss to that type of shot. It was basically a short slice near to or inside the service line. I could get there but I ended up hitting into the net or popping them up. I didn't realize this shot was my undoing until after the match.

When I run into this shot now, I always slice them back. I try to keep them low and hit them into an awkward spot. Often I find that my opponent is out of position to handle either the deep down the line, or the short crosscourt shot. Like artoftennis said, pace is not a concern here. Placement is what you're after. Hitting behind your opponent and keeping the ball low works really well with these. Also, try to concentrate on watching the racquet into the ball. I found that when I missed these it was almost always related to looking into the court or at my opponent instead of watching the ball. Just keep you shot selection simple and pick one as you move to the ball. Focus on hitting that shot and don't look up until you see the ball leave the strings. I haven't thought about this too much recently, but now that I think about it, I can remember hitting at least 4 or 5 winners recently simply from placement on this type of shot. It certainly doesn't trouble me like it used to.

benperet
08-27-2006, 09:25 PM
I too would probably slice them back. Usualy playing the short ones more down the line will give you a bit better position at the net.

Rickson
08-28-2006, 03:57 AM
The title pretty much says it.
They are typically slices from the opponent that I reach comfortably, a little behind the service line. I feel I should take control of the point, but I lose more points than I win from there.

Any attempt to hit topspin results in contact near the bottom of the frame.
I am afraid of hitting long when I hit up without topspin, so I end up pushing the ball slowly without too much spin. I have to hit it to the opponent's weak side in order avoid serious trouble. If I slice it, the result is worse than no spin - it goes up too high and lands short anyway.

What shot should I develop for this situation?

Ironically this shot is easier when the ball is deep. I can take a swing without worrying about hitting long, and I am not moving far( & back) from my neutral position near the center of the baseline.
What kind of grip do you use? My primary fh grip is a semi-western, but I use an efh grip when I face low balling slicers. The more open grip allows me to open up the racquet face much easier so I could get that ball over the net with no problem. Too many people are stuck on a couple of things that are a recipe for disaster against low bouncing slices: 1) they keep their western grips 2) they believe that a square face is the way to go, even on low balls. Low balls were made for an open face so square is not always ideal and if you're using a western type grip, you'd have to twist and turn so much more than if you used an efh or a continental. Open your face and use an open grip for low balls. You'll have no problem returning them in the future.

Thud and blunder
08-28-2006, 04:16 AM
..and HUSTLE! Make sure you're getting to these balls early, so you don't have to play them from around your ankles.

I have this problem a lot...it's just a floater, plenty of time to get into position, no need to kill myself getting into position...and before you know it, you're in trouble. Decisive footwork is a big part of the battle.

fishuuuuu
08-28-2006, 04:41 AM
It's a shot with higher risk, but that doesn't mean you should [i]never[/] go for it. :)

I would never go for it if I have the option, unless it would wrong-foot and opponent. It is the easiest approach to be passed on, being a relatively cut and dry down-the-line passing shot. A down-the-line approach is more effective to me, while a down-the-middle approach can be a mixed bag.

And as far as how to hit it, I would really hit out at this ball, but hit up a lot and get crazy top on the ball. If you are the net you should take advantage and rob time away by hitting equally as big as the strokes that got you into the net.

maverick1
08-28-2006, 04:42 AM
Rickson, my match grip is eastern, though I am experimenting with a more western grip.

Thud & Blunder, I did a good job of hustling to the ball in good position. I had all the time I needed. Just didn't know what to do from then. Eventually the best I could do was push it without spin or pace, but low over the net down the line. It didn't have depth, but relatively low ball on the BH kept him from attacking.

I want to know whether I should keep trying the same shot and go for more depth. Or should I practice a FH slice? On my backhand, I have more experience with these balls. I can generally slice them crosscrourt, reasonably deep and low over the center of the net. On the FH, I have no control unless I hitting with a little topspin. This was the first guy who decided my FH was the weaker side. To my surprise, it IS, if someone can hit this particular ball all day.

fishuuuuu
08-28-2006, 04:50 AM
Rickson, my match grip is eastern, though I am experimenting with a more western grip.

Thud & Blunder, I did a good job of hustling to the ball in good position. I had all the time I needed. Just didn't know what to do from then. Eventually the best I could do was push it without spin or pace, but low over the net down the line. It didn't have depth, but relatively low ball on the BH kept him from attacking.

I want to know whether I should keep trying the same shot and go for more depth. Or should I practice a FH slice? On my backhand, I have more experience with these balls. I can generally slice them crosscrourt, reasonably deep and low over the center of the net. On the FH, I have no control unless I hitting with a little topspin. This was the first guy who decided my FH was the weaker side. To my surprise, it IS, if someone can hit this particular ball all day.

Stay with a relaxed Eastern-grip that is somewhat toward Semi-Western. Full-eastern can be a bit awkward sometimes and the same for full-western.

Tennis_Monk
08-28-2006, 06:57 AM
Depth > Pace in this situation.

Remember to never go deep crosscourt. Always angle it off or set up your volley going down the line.

Hmmm. It happened to be one of my strong areas with extremely good results. My first choice is to go Deep CrossCourt with Topspin. In fact the addl few feet seems to help as well.

The advantage is, if you have good pace on the shot, it makes opponent job little more tough to track it down.

My standard grip is SW for FH and i try to bend my knees to get to the ball cleanly so that i can impart spin. If it is dead low, then i use Eastern/Continental or usually scoop the ball.