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Janne
08-28-2006, 10:38 AM
Hi, Im about to start taking 2 hour lessons every sunday and right now Im probably a 1.5. Im very interested in the SV play-style and would like to know how they play when they arent serving.

Do they run into the net after returning the serve or do they play an all-court style and wait for the right moment to come into the net?

Would also be cool if someone would post alot of info about this particular play-style and good strategies at lower levels since I want to be a SV/All-court player!

Thanks in advance, yours truly!

Supernatural_Serve
08-28-2006, 10:54 AM
Do they run into the net after returning the serve or do they play an all-court style and wait for the right moment to come into the net?

Not necessarily. But, serve and volley players are very comfortable at the net. So, they are always looking for opportunities to hit approach shots, or attack short balls offered by their opponent, and advance to the net to finish the point at the net versus trading ground strokes.

They prefer applying pressure, stealing time, and reading their opponents passing shots and exploding into them for the put away angle volley.

Another concept they employ is the "chip and charge" which involves hitting the ball low, and advancing to the net. Slicing balls low and deep is critical to this concept. A nice low slow moving slice that forces the opponent to hit a ground stroke from the baseline (forced to lift it up) into a net player in position at the net yields a lot of points to aggressive net players.

Focus on serves, especially learning various off-speed serves (allowing you to get in position at the net), kick serves, etc., explosive footwork forward, a solid split step, and then an explosive movement to play the volley. Quiet, quick, soft, but stable hands at the net, and solid overheads (you don't want to work hard, get a weak lob, and then blow an overhead), and like I said solid ability to slice low and deep.

Do these things, and you are well on your way to being an aggressive net player which is important to serve and volleyers.

Get a hold of any videos or books describing Stefan Edberg's game. He's the master serve and volleyer.

Janne
08-28-2006, 11:01 AM
Awesome post Supernatural_Serve, thanks a ton! :D

TennsDog
08-28-2006, 01:04 PM
There are pretty much two strategies serve and volleyers use when returning. Some chip and charge, hitting a low slice back deap and follow it in to net. Others just hit a normal return and wait for an opportunity to come in on an approach shot. This is the method I prefer since I don't have a lot of confidence in my return game. It can be helpful, though, to chip and charge just to pressure your opponent on their first shot.

As for becoming a serve and volleyer, you need to have an above average serve. You don't need to be able to paste them in there at 130, but you should have good directional control and be able to mix up spins and speeds. In general, a topspin serve is good to serve and volley on because it goes higher over the net, giving you more time to get in, and it gets up on the opponent, making it harder for them to attack. It's useful in serving and volleying to learn certain patterns, like hit a slice serve wide in the ad court and then volley to the open court.

Another important thing is to realize and accept that you will get passed, both on returns, rally balls, and then some just plain lucky shots. Don't get discouraged, though, because in the long run, serving and volleying can be a very effective strategy and you need to be determined and consistent with it. That means don't try it in the first game, lose it, and then give up. Figure out why they beat you and then change that on your next service game. Maybe change up your serve's pace, maybe they like to hit a certain passing shot a lot. Whatever it is, be persistant and results will come.
Good luck.

travlerajm
08-28-2006, 01:09 PM
Another important thing is to realize and accept that you will get passed, both on returns, rally balls, and then some just plain lucky shots. Don't get discouraged, though, because in the long run, serving and volleying can be a very effective strategy and you need to be determined and consistent with it.

This is excellent advice. A true serve-and-volleyer must be fearless and have the attitude that "you passed me that time, but can you do it every time?"

Janne
08-28-2006, 01:26 PM
Thank you TennsDog, great information! Would anyone know any lower level racquets that would suit serve and volley players/all court players with medium-long strokes, eastern and/or semi-western grip, preferably under a 98" head and heavier than 10,50oz?

TennsDog
08-28-2006, 01:56 PM
The Dunlop 300G is a good easy racket to use. I think it's about 10.4 oz, but it's very stable for it's weight and has good control. I think the 300G is the most easily customizable racket I have played with, by which I mean that different strings and tension can change it's playability quite a bit, so you can fine tune it as you like without lead tape. If you can't find a 300G (I think TW stopped stocking the mp version), the M-Fil 300 may be a suitable alternative.

TENNIS_99
08-28-2006, 03:04 PM
I've seen almost in every clubs I played some middle age guys(not limited to:D ) playing SV,flat strokes and beat the crap of younger players hard hitting from 4 feet behind the baseline.

I agree the success of SV has something to do with the level played, but isn't it a beauty to have in tennis?

AngeloDS
08-28-2006, 03:37 PM
Along with everyone has said, I agree. Though, Serve and volley is purely percentage tennis. You must really understand percentage tennis to be able to play it so go study up on it ;). There's tons of books out there on percentage tennis and also various websites.

I'd work on developing a serve and work on a specific volley. My bread and butter is my backhand volley and my serve out wide on the ad court. 95% of the time it will come to my backhand (a lot stronger) and I close out a lot of games because of this.

Amone
08-28-2006, 04:52 PM
My returns go something like this-- First serves, I try to play consistent from the baseline. I'm not dumb, I know I'm on the defensive. I frequently revert to my two-handed forehand for these times, it's way more consistent. I don't even try to get to the net.

Second serves-- and weak first serves-- I less chip and charge, and more as one commentator worded it 'smash and crash.'

Kaptain Karl
08-28-2006, 05:26 PM
Take a look here, too. (http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=78147) It will help you understand the different ways people play.

- KK

Rickson
08-28-2006, 07:33 PM
Do they run into the net after returning the serve or do they play an all-court style and wait for the right moment to come into the net?

You mean the chip and charge? I only charge on deep returns so if I hit a ball that doesn't pass the service line, I stay back. If I hit a return that lands close to the baseline, I'll charge, but not if the ball bounces high as this sets me up to get passed from the forehand side. Ideally, I charge on balls that land close to the baseline and bounce low.