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View Full Version : How to become a professional umpire?


Zets147
09-04-2006, 03:32 PM
Anybody have any information on becoming an umpire for the ATP/WTA Tour?
I'd imagine it'd be a ladder process:
Volunteer>Ballkid>Linesperson>Ballperson>Baselinesman>Servicelinesman>Chairumpire.

What do you guys think?

MasterTS
09-04-2006, 03:45 PM
Anybody have any information on becoming an umpire for the ATP/WTA Tour?
I'd imagine it'd be a ladder process:
Volunteer>Ballkid>Linesperson>Ballperson>Baselinesman>Servicelinesman>Chairumpire.

What do you guys think?

Lol.. ballboys are kids that send applications in and I think they get a stipen.. linesperson is well higher than the ball person

Zets147
09-04-2006, 04:34 PM
Well, it is a ladder you know? lol

nickybol
09-04-2006, 09:22 PM
Call the USTA and ITF for more information. If you want to do international tournaments, you need to have an ITF badge.

SoBad
11-01-2007, 08:14 PM
Anybody have any information on becoming an umpire for the ATP/WTA Tour?
I'd imagine it'd be a ladder process:
Volunteer>Ballkid>Linesperson>Ballperson>Baselinesman>Servicelinesman>Chairumpire.

What do you guys think?

No, I don’t think that’s how it works. I think you have to start as USTA official for junior tournaments, and then work your way up. So you’d start by officiating some local B10, and then work up to B12, sectional, and B14, and national, blabla, and then if you’re any good, you go international, and pro, and then they have bronze, silver, gold badge ATP umpires, and then you can be an umpire superstar like Roddick’s friend Lars Graf or that Arabic guy Al-Mohani that everyone loves.

jimmycoop
11-02-2007, 06:54 AM
Zets,

Go to the USTA web site. There is an "Officials" link that will take you to the USTA Officials Career Guide and it will tell you everything you need to know. You have to "go to school"--attend a workshop, take tests, get some experience working tournaments, etc. Good luck; the sport needs more folks interested in becoming officials.

CAM178
11-02-2007, 07:00 AM
I actually looked into this earlier this year, as I pseudo-resigned from my job.

The pay isn't bad, but it is a great deal of travel and wear & tear. Top pay is close to $75K, but that's not too shabby for a part-time job. You get reimbursed for travel and get a small per diem, so all in all, it ain't a bad gig. You should send an e-mail to Norm Christ or something. Or Carlos. He's the guy doing the Masters series lately, and seems to be a pretty cool dude.

Good luck!

tennis-n-sc
11-02-2007, 09:39 AM
I actually looked into this earlier this year, as I pseudo-resigned from my job.

The pay isn't bad, but it is a great deal of travel and wear & tear. Top pay is close to $75K, but that's not too shabby for a part-time job. You get reimbursed for travel and get a small per diem, so all in all, it ain't a bad gig. You should send an e-mail to Norm Christ or something. Or Carlos. He's the guy doing the Masters series lately, and seems to be a pretty cool dude.

Good luck!

Cam, it's way more complicated than this. And very political. But you first must start at the local USTA level and work junior and adult tournaments, probably some college work. Pay at this leve is around a $100 per day as of a few years ago. Most larger states have their own organizations of officials that work within the confines of the various sections. Some even have quasi unions. After getting proper experience, you may apply for pro work, usually as a lines person initially. Most WTA and ATP tournaments in the U.S. that aren't majors use local and sectional USTA officials as lines persons. After enough experience as a lines person, you can work your way eventually into the chair. It is not easy work and to make any money requires a ton of travel, often at your own expense. That's why only a very small minority of of local officials ever advance to the pro chair level, much less tournament referee or director.

CAM178
11-02-2007, 10:21 AM
Cam, it's way more complicated than this. And very political. But you first must start at the local USTA level and work junior and adult tournaments, probably some college work. Pay at this leve is around a $100 per day as of a few years ago. Most larger states have their own organizations of officials that work within the confines of the various sections. Some even have quasi unions. After getting proper experience, you may apply for pro work, usually as a lines person initially. Most WTA and ATP tournaments in the U.S. that aren't majors use local and sectional USTA officials as lines persons. After enough experience as a lines person, you can work your way eventually into the chair. It is not easy work and to make any money requires a ton of travel, often at your own expense. That's why only a very small minority of of local officials ever advance to the pro chair level, much less tournament referee or director.

Yeah, I know it's more complicated. I just didn't want to write a long post on it. Plus, I just wanted to give the OP some hope.

Lloyd Barcenilla
11-02-2007, 10:51 AM
Then you can tell all the players they must try harder after double faulting...

Jonnyf
11-02-2007, 11:46 AM
Steve Ulrich has a high paying job in London that lets him go away to umpire, not bad eh!

SoBad
11-02-2007, 09:58 PM
Then you can tell all the players they must try harder after double faulting...

Is that what all that talk is about with umpire coaching Davydenko in the match against Baghdatis?

P.S. Interesting statement in your signature. I think there might be some truth to that.

Steve Ulrich has a high paying job in London that lets him go away to umpire, not bad eh!

What's his high paying London job?

Federer's pet goat Leanne
11-02-2007, 10:12 PM
I think after a year+ already with no response from him means that he is not interested anymore.

SoBad
11-02-2007, 10:20 PM
I think after a year+ already with no response from him means that he is not interested anymore.

I disagree, because if you read closely, the most informative posts did not arrive until the last few days in this thread. Unless he has already made some great advancements on the umpire career path, and that is the reason why he is not actively participating in the thread at present, I am sure he appreciates all the advice he is receiving in this thread currently.

Federer's pet goat Leanne
11-02-2007, 10:23 PM
Ah I see. He might even be training under Graf by now in order to make crappy calls in Roddick's matches. har har

SoBad
11-02-2007, 10:27 PM
^^ you mean on how to deal with big-mouth overhyped one-slam wonder dorks who are bigtime linecall crybabies?