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vinouspleasure
03-06-2004, 04:03 PM
My wife is taking some lessons with our pro. The racquet head starts parallel to the ground, is taken back with a loop and then sweeps in front of her like a windshield wiper.

Anyone out there hitting this?

corncob3466
03-06-2004, 08:16 PM
yeah, but i do it more exaggerated. i bring the racquet in a big loop, with the head low to the ground for topspin. i then hit the ball with action(more or less) and the racquet finishes over my shoulder. this is a very long, loopy swing.

Bungalo Bill
03-06-2004, 09:13 PM
The windshield wiper method is popular right now. The problem with this method is players think you need to be wristy with the racquet. That is a myth.

the other thing that is a problem is players break off the swing too soon because they are more focused on rapping the racquet around their necks then going through the ball and letting the relaxing muscles on the follwothrough take the racquet over the shoulder.

Just be sure she is still going through the ball before she allows the racquet to followthrough.

vinouspleasure
03-07-2004, 04:48 AM
The follow-through is not over the shoulder. It's by the waist.

Let me try to describe it:
- racquet head starts parallel to ground
- loop backswing
- racquet head proscribes an arc that starts at your waist (point of contact) and then followthrough is a semi circle which starts at waist, moves up to head (palm facing outward) and then down to other side of body by waist. So it's like a figure 8. At the end, the elbow points up, racquet head down.

Mr. Wilson
03-07-2004, 05:21 PM
Take a look at tennisone this month on the "millenium" forehand. The finish now seems to be around belly button height. I tried this the other day, it will need a bit of tweaking, but I can see the advantage in this type of stroke. It sort of resembles a sidearm throw, as if you were going to skip a flat pebble across a pond. If you think of it, this is a natural movement, you would do it naturally if throwing sidearm. It has the potential to generate a lot of power, especially with the body rotating from one side to the other. If you can keep the ball out of the bottom of the net, you can fire a nice bullet your opponent won't be able to run down. When the weather gets better, I will get my ball machine out and report back!

Bungalo Bill
03-07-2004, 06:43 PM
The follow-through is not over the shoulder. It's by the waist.

Let me try to describe it:
- racquet head starts parallel to ground
- loop backswing
- racquet head proscribes an arc that starts at your waist (point of contact) and then followthrough is a semi circle which starts at waist, moves up to head (palm facing outward) and then down to other side of body by waist. So it's like a figure 8. At the end, the elbow points up, racquet head down.

There is also a rap around the neck, both are popular.

ho
03-08-2004, 11:13 AM
it's a combination of hit through the ball and pronate her forearm. If you pronate your forearm but not hit through the ball, racket ends around the neck, ball lands short . if you hit through the ball but not pronate your forearm, racket ends up in front of you, ball goes long. Anyway, he is a good teacher. May sure your wife is strong enough to need this type. Most of female just need to hit through the ball. few have problem of control the depth.

Thunnus
03-08-2004, 12:23 PM
I agree with ho. You don't see many females using this stroke because it requires a good deal of strengh and excellent footwork, which most recreational female players lack. That forearm pronation is what adds extra pop and topspin to bring the ball down. This is a modern and advance forehand technique. You have to make sure that you don't over-rotate your body when you hit the ball while swinging very fast.

PhatAbbott
03-08-2004, 01:35 PM
I dont think strength is the right word.

Too many players try to muscle the ball as hard as they can. Its rigid and causes injurys.

If I start to muscle the ball my arm tenses up and I get a weakened swing path because my arm pulls in to much. But If im loose... take the racket high and let it drop. I gain alot of momentum and have a smooth fluid swing into the ball.

Bungalo Bill
03-09-2004, 12:02 PM
I agree with ho. You don't see many females using this stroke because it requires a good deal of strengh and excellent footwork, which most recreational female players lack. That forearm pronation is what adds extra pop and topspin to bring the ball down. This is a modern and advance forehand technique. You have to make sure that you don't over-rotate your body when you hit the ball while swinging very fast.

So to prevent what Thunnus is talking about, you have to make sure the elbow comes forward and is in front of your body as rotation begins. It is not rotation and a forward moving elbow at the same time. This will mess up your control.

When you "pull" the butt cap forward make sure the elbow comes forward first, then rotate.

Obviously, this happens so fast that it is rythmic and it is relatively hard to seperate the feeling whether you brought the elbow forward first or you rotated. But with slow deliberate practice you will know how it should feel. Just remember that the rotation trails the elbow moving forward. The elbow should be in front of your body before rotation begins or a fraction there of. this helps the shoulder get into the ball, and not away from it or past it as you make impact which causes your stroke to falter. The shoulders are key in todays tennis.

This will help you develop that Roddick like forehand. If you want to hit a hard flat ball, bring the racquet forward from the elbow in a straight line. For topspin, you will be on an upward slope. I guarantee you will hit one heavy ball. You will find you dont have to swing hard at all and the ball will fly off your racquet with control!

If you want further analysis contact me.

Thunnus
03-09-2004, 12:20 PM
Mr. Bunglow is very good at decribing a complex concept in a simple and easy way to understand . Pretty much the only time that I miss my forehand is when I start rotating my shoulder before I have my elbow out in front with my arm trailing my right shoulder. This happens if I try to go for too much or when I don't have time.

Be sure to hit the ball way out in front and you should be able to hit even harder when you can load your legs and time it well all together. It is easy to say but I found it to be challenging to do this on a fast moving ball with lots of topspin.

ho
03-09-2004, 12:33 PM
this is the point that i disagree with Brenda in her article in Tennis Magazine, after couple week of practice. For an average man like me, i can only do one thing. I cannot move my arm first then catch up with my rotation. or I cannot do rotation first then at last second, move my arm. In match point i have tendency just to hit with arm alone and forget to rotate or the other way around. Average, average man.
Hitting with arm first then catch up with rotation is just like jumping out of the running train. If the train run slow, even you jump fast, you still ok. But if the train running fast and you jump out slow. chance are you in hospital. Definitely, i compare rotation with a big muscle as a train.
To hit power, you better rotation first then stick out your hand in linear way. Anyway, for me I cannot do either both ways. But there is a way out to average poeple. please check my post on I CANNOT EXTEND MY ARMS IN GROUND STROKE, HELP!HELP!HELP! recently.

Thunnus
03-09-2004, 12:45 PM
It took me several monthes to somewhat comfortable with this swing. I still have much to work on. This is radically different than the traditional technique, and you have to be very patient with it.

ho
03-09-2004, 01:29 PM
I'm sorry, Mr Thunnus starting your rotation near contact point even you pushout your arm real hard will not give you power. Maximun speed of rotation can only occurs when we give them time. it will be max at near contact point if your start rotation some where at the begining. Granted, linear speed of your hand will be max at near contact point. But it is no comparision with max speed of rotation at all. Body elements are like a set of pendulum tied together. the first is your feet the last is your racket. in order to have max speed at the last, you have to start the first pendulum first, then the lag behind of every elements will catch up near contact create a serie of snap resulting into a power swing call kinetic chain energy. Dont need to say too far, just hit someone with only your hand and try again with a whip like smash with a full rotation without even push your hand. there is no contest.

Bungalo Bill
03-09-2004, 02:20 PM
I'm sorry, Mr Thunnus starting your rotation near contact point even you pushout your arm real hard will not give you power. Maximun speed of rotation can only occurs when we give them time. it will be max at near contact point if your start rotation some where at the begining. Granted, linear speed of your hand will be max at near contact point. But it is no comparision with max speed of rotation at all. Body elements are like a set of pendulum tied together. the first is your feet the last is your racket. in order to have max speed at the last, you have to start the first pendulum first, then the lag behind of every elements will catch up near contact create a serie of snap resulting into a power swing call kinetic chain energy. Dont need to say too far, just hit someone with only your hand and try again with a whip like smash with a full rotation without even push your hand. there is no contest.

Mr. Ho,

I understand!!! Maybe a better way to explain it is your elbow controls the rotation of the shoulders.
Rotation really takes over once the elbow is forward of the body.

Lets learn why this is important. Everyone has had a little toy that had a bunch of little bee bee's in a case. When you spun this case, all the bee bee's would be sent AWAY from the center. Centrifugal force can destroy a stroke unless you control it. If you rotate first, it will be difficult to keep the elbow close to the body while you rotate, as you will have forces against your elbow forcing it away from your body. Once your elbow moves farther away from your body - anything goes! In other words, you will have a lot less control of your racquet face.

So the key is getting that elbow moving forward into the stroke while your shoulder rotates into the ball. This keep syour rotation in control, compact, and above all powerful.

By the way, anyone that wants to practice this can learn this. ;)

By bringing the butt cap towards the ball, with your elbow, your rotation will be controlled and you will achieve better consistency.

The other thing to note is the non-hitting arm folds into the chest as the hitting arm goes forward.

Ho, it is hard to explain on this board, but I will back up Tunnus on this one. If there is a way to post a Quicktime video please show me how.

ho
03-09-2004, 05:30 PM
Mr BB. Thank for an understanding reply. Exact like you say, We need an rotation of the trunk and a linear thrust of the hand to take advantage of all the power that we can only have. Question is, how can we do it naturally from the beginning, not in the middle if the stroke or near the hitting. As i say. and average person can only do only one thing, but we need two things at the same time. My obvious choice is rotation and you probably agree with it. Now I narrow the choice to just rotation. But in that rotation, I want my hand to do a linear. As my post before, there is trick that we can do it. by the time you start your left hand from pointing to the right side to some where to the net, your movement will naturally start the rotation, no linear. but instead of keep sweeping around, drop your left elbow to your rib case and FIXE IT. The rotation of your shoulder now will rotate around your left shoulder and launch your right shoulder into the shot. But I want the over all launch of my hand is linear, not circular. By pointing you racket at the right corner instead of back fence, your right elbow will naturally approach to the body when the rotation start. the combination of two circular opposite direction of your trunk and your right elbow will result in a linear thrurst of your hand. It just like a piece of wood slit out of a 2 side planner. It go straight out. Thank you so much to share with me.

fastdunn
03-09-2004, 06:23 PM
To me(although not an expert), there's nothing much to this
swing. Let me explain it in my way:

I used to throw my racquet to have the net catch it whenever
I feel miserable on the court. To throw the racquet spining,
I must bring the butt cap forward and make it spin (around my
grip) before I release and let it fly....

So to me, it's like throwing your racquet againt incoming ball
(on the rise, preferably) like you're in worst temper tandrum.
The rest of it is to make sure I put a lot of top spin because
it(the ball) is going to fly hard and fast....

vinouspleasure
03-09-2004, 10:53 PM
well, my wife showed me what the pro said. It seems to me that the elbow up, racquet down could lead to some tendon problems. I'm concerned that no one has hit with this motion for 10 years...so we don't really understand the wear and tear on the body.

Thunnus
03-10-2004, 10:34 AM
That's why I am a bit surprized that her pro is teaching her this motion. I learned this technique in last several monthes and I like it but I am not sure if I would teach that to my wife although she is young and athletic. As I said, it requires a good deal of strength (forearm/legs) to swing fast and great footwork to position yourself just right. I must say, however, I have been surprized to find out how strong the forearm muscle is and I doubt that this technique would injure anyone so long as you are strong enough and have a smooth swing.

Thunnus
03-10-2004, 10:37 AM
BTW, this technique has been around for more than 10 years and I personally know people who have been swinging this way and have put tens of thousands of hours on their arm. As far as I can tell, their arms have not fallen off yet.

vinouspleasure
03-10-2004, 11:54 AM
thunnus, I know the over-the-shoulder finish has been around for a long time Are you sure we're talking about the same finish....elbow up racket head pointing to the floor?

Thunnus
03-10-2004, 01:09 PM
Yes. Finish at your left hip like Ferrero due to forearm pronation with elbow up and right thumb pointing down. Ferrero and his buddies in Spain have been using this technique pretty much ever since they started playing tennis. You should be on the receiving end of this shot to fully appreciate the spin and pop gets generated by someone who has been doing this for 15+ years. Just remember how Ferrero was dismantling that tall Dutch guy in the French Open last year from the baseline. While it is not quite that good but it is pretty close. The main advantage is that you can hit extremely hard without hitting the ball out. The resulting topspin does not sit up but kick forward very fast which is pretty hard to time and feels heavy.

vinouspleasure
03-10-2004, 01:19 PM
actually the pro challenged my wife to try to hit the ball out and she couldn't when she hit it right.

I dunno, compared to the way I learned to hit a tennis ball (no loop), this movement seems pretty complex. On the plus side, it cured my wifes tennis elbow.

Thunnus
03-10-2004, 01:28 PM
Wow... That's actually pretty good. She must be hitting a lot of topspin. I am just getting comfortable with this on my forehand, and now I am trying to do basically the same with my two handed backhand, with the goal being putting enough topspin such that it would be nearly impossible to hit it out. It should be very useful on clay court. Did she have to change her racket or did she stick with the same?

vinouspleasure
03-10-2004, 01:53 PM
she has a liquid metal. The pro is getting one too, so I guess it's a good racquet for the shot. It's too light for me but then, I've not tried the stroke with her racquet.

When I've fooled around with the shot, I can get heavy ts but the ball falls short too often. If I focus, I can correct it by hitting through the ball a little more and relaxing my grip, but it seems like it will be hard to be consitent under pressure with all that movement.

I dunno, she gave me a couple of lessons with the pro as a bday present, maybe I'll ask him to show me.

tlm
12-06-2005, 08:23 PM
BB is right you can ww over the shoulder to,but when i watch some of the pros really go fo it they finish with the racket head pointing down.this is the way i hit most of the time+ you can really cut loose + put a ton of topsin on the ball.

Marius_Hancu
12-07-2005, 06:31 AM
BTW, this technique has been around for more than 10 years and I personally know people who have been swinging this way and have put tens of thousands of hours on their arm. As far as I can tell, their arms have not fallen off yet.

it is an exagerated topspin technique and should be used only sparely such as on short balls, but not as a regular shot from the baseline.

otherwise you will be paying with your wrist (and elbow), as mentioned in this article by the specialists of the French Federation:

http://www.stms.nl/june2001/artikel23.htm

check the player in Figs 1 & 2. he's doing it.

and this is the healthy technique, as shown by Fed and Hew:
Federer's and Hewitt's FH (high-speed camera clip):
http://www.araf72.dsl.pipex.com/1000FPS.mpg

tlm
12-07-2005, 08:32 PM
I am 50 years old, in good shape + i use this forehand all the time. I have not had any injuries from using ww forehand on 90% of my swings. I play 10-15 hours a week in the summer+8-10 hours indoors in the winter.

ShcMad
12-07-2005, 10:38 PM
I found a clip of Roddick's forehand. Hope this helps in terms of visualization.

http://www.pyramidtennis.com/library/library.php?pid=241&lang=th

AngeloDS
12-08-2005, 06:44 PM
I do this sometimes, and it can generate a lot of topspin. An insane amount of topspin. But there's secrets to prevent from getting injured and causing stress on the arm.

As I always say. Your body should be moving with the racquet if you're going to windshield wiper to prevent injuries. And it should end at your hip. You can get seriously injured.

By moving with the body I mean as you swing through your upper body should rotate. Do this, take a basketball and hold it out. And move it to your hip without moving your arms. Just using body rotation. Or look at the roddick clip above.

If you don't move your upper body, it torques your elbow and that could cause microtears and cause tennis elbow or put pressure on the elbow joint and yeah.

http://www.pyramidtennis.com/library/library.php?pid=214&lang=th

As you see in the clips. They rotate their upper body and finish near the hip.

Mattle
12-11-2005, 07:09 AM
erhm was this stroke made for lazy people who get can't in position for real tennis strokes?

FiveO
12-11-2005, 08:07 AM
IMO the ww fh is not something unto itself. It is an additional to basic modern technique. Problems arise when ww motion is performed while excluding other very basic elements of the fh. Those problems are caused, I believe, when those wanting to emulate it are distracted by it's most visually obvious characteristic. The follow-through. This has been beaten to death but I think needs repeating in this setting. The follow-through causes nothing and is a result dictated by grip, path and speed with which the player accelerates the racquet through the zone with both the linked progression of the basic fh AND the added rotation of the hand and forearm.
The follow through is the natural end caused by those means.

Keep in mind that the more eastern the fh grip the less potential rotation of hand and forearm are available. Sampras did use this technique frequently but it was not as obvious in his follow through because the grip simply doesn't allow for as much rotation. Because of this Sampras racquet rarely finished by his opposite hip and/or with the tip rotated down past his hand and down toward the court.

The more western the grip the more potential rotation of hand and forearm is available to the player. Hence Federer when hitting w/ a more sw grip, Roddick, Nadal, etc. will demonstrate those to the hip, racquet tip down finishes more often. Less acceleration in that rotational force will result in a wrapped finish. Varying speed of that rotation will result in various finishes.

My advice to those looking to add the ww effect to their repetoire is not to allow finish to distract them from the basics of the fh. The racquet's path will finish where it finishes.

Again the WW is not an alternative to a basic fh, it is an 'Add-On', to the standard fh. Risk of injury with the ww motion comes when someone trying to employ it attempts to hit fh's with the ww alone, by itself, while sacrificing the basics of set-up, arm slot, etc. and/or forces a ww follow through for the sake of following through like their favorite pro. Trying to force a Roddick ww finish to the opposite hip with the racquet rotated down past the hand with an eastern grip is wrong, in-efficient and risks injury.

Remember the point of adding the ww rotation to the fh. It is intended to add topspin to the ball at contact by further acceleration of the string bed on that low to high path using the additional rotation of the forearm and hand to do so. That much speed and torque will cause the follow though to go where it goes. Add it to your fh, don't use it alone and don't force a finish that your grip, path and level of acceleration didn't cause naturally.

tlm
12-11-2005, 08:28 AM
Hey mattle did you look at the video clip of roddick hitting ww forehand.I dont think that you can call that lazy,the truth is the windshieldwiper forehand takes a lot of energy.Much more than conventional forehand,i noticed a couple of years ago watching roddick on tape in slomo,that his finish varys from over shoulder to racket head pointing down by his left hip.Also i saw that when he really goes for that big winner forehand he uses ww method most of the time.A few years ago i was using oscar wegner methods to try +develop a better forehand, and it helped big time.My wife+i filmed some of our shots +i noticed i was following through with racket by my left hip with head of racket pointing down.I thought this was wrong even though the forehands i was hitting were better than ever.all the instructions i was taught say to finish over shoulder,including oscars videos.I would try going over shoulder but it did not work for me.Then i saw an article about windshieldwiper forehand+ it said it is a new technique that is becoming popular,so i just stayed with it.That is when i noticed a lot of pros using it so i thought it must be okay,+ oscar wegner had an update saying that if you use this method + like it go ahead.That is what i like about oscar even though he didnt teach this in his original videos he noticed more people having good results with this method+ now promotes it.He is not afraid to change with the times.I use this on most forehands i have time on+ i can tell you that it is a great technique.You can put a ton of topspin on ball+ really cut loose with your swing, i can tell you every big winner i hit i am using this method.When ever i play a new opponent they always ask me how i put so much ts on the ball.Most of the guys in my club hit conventional flat strokes+ i can just unleash on those shots with the ww method + eat them up with the topspin.I played a new guy last night that was giving me fits rushing the net,so instead of going for big winner i started looping ts shots to his backhand+ that did the job.I want to make the point that you dont have to go for big shots with this method.I can hit medium paced loopers back to baseline just loaded with ts+ give a guy fits all day.I would say downfall of this stroke is the opposite of what you said about being lazy,it takes a lot of energy+ it can wear you out.I also hear a lot about it being bad for your arm, but so far i have not had problem with it.Watch the roddick clip on this thread he has perfect technique on the ww stroke+ note even though it does not show ball the whole time it appears that most of his takeback is after bounce.

Marius_Hancu
12-11-2005, 08:30 AM
FiveO,

you put it well.

SageOfDeath
12-16-2005, 11:57 PM
I was once guilty of focusing on the WW. It made a lot of effort for just lots of short balls with some spin, thank god no injuries during that time. Well put FiveO, maybe you've just stopped an injury and removed a block of struggle for an improving player.

heavyraket
12-17-2005, 12:38 AM
for me, i find that i if make contact in front with good racquet prep and lose arm, like throwing with the hand going thru during contact with the ball and wieght transfer then i am striking the ball well. i try not to over think it. i watch a lot of tennis and i think that visual helps me a lot. i will never hit the ball like the pros!

papa
12-17-2005, 07:03 AM
Yeah, good post FiveO. The only thing I might debate/take exception too is that the follow-through isn't that important. I think I might argue that if one starts off in the correct position and finishes in the correct position, there is a good chance that everything in the middle might be right or close to it. I have found that having folks hold their finish position and then compare it to where it should be, they start to correct the stroke. Many quit on their strokes and as a result can never seem to hit the ball well.

FiveO
12-17-2005, 02:01 PM
Yeah, good post FiveO. The only thing I might debate/take exception too is that the follow-through isn't that important. I think I might argue that if one starts off in the correct position and finishes in the correct position, there is a good chance that everything in the middle might be right or close to it. I have found that having folks hold their finish position and then compare it to where it should be, they start to correct the stroke. Many quit on their strokes and as a result can never seem to hit the ball well.

I agree if speaking about rudimentary stroke technique, that you can back-door a proper string bed to ball relation thru the hitting zone by "start here, end here" reinforcement, and having a follow through as opposed to none indicates a slow down through contact.

What I was speaking to was not allowing oneself to become "distracted" by finish to the point where they ignor proper set-up, proper attack of the ball thru the zone in a relaxed fashion which a fundamental to the basic fh on which the ww fh is built upon. I believe the ww effect should be reserved for levels of play where the fundamentals and awareness of the zone already results in proper finishes, naturally. Once at that level my concern shifts to someone treating the ww fh as something different and divorced from basic fh technique. This is where a good stroke can suddenly go bad and the risk of injury can enter the picture.

Someone in good control of the fundamentals on the basic fh is in control of proper set-up, and proper orientation of the racquet face while accelerating through the zone. A player should have already mastered a solid set up and already be very aware of the most important section of the swing, the contact zone. Once that is ingrained in a player the follow through like the ball flight is result and without further input (i.e. an active stoppage) will end
properly, naturally. He will follow through properly because the preceeding segments of the stroke are proper. Rather than the inverse used with beginners or lower intermediates, to back-door a good contact zone by "start here, finish here and freeze in balance" follow throughs.

Another point was, especially when adding varying degrees of torque to the forearm in a ww fh w/ even a single sw fh grip, a "proper" follow through can end in a more conventional wrap, by the opposite ribs at sternum height or all the way by the opposite hip. One player with one grip, depending on the amount of ww force applied can "properly" demonstrate all those follow-throughs on his fh.

Fundamentally, I agree that the follow through is important in that it should be full, indicating acceleration thru the zone on a proper path. But intermediates looking to add ww to their fh's should be aware that the ww effect can cause multiple finishes depending on the speed and amount of ww motion employed, shouldn't sacrifice the basics, and should not graft a favorite ww finish of their favorite pro, onto improper technique which will likely yield poor results and risk injury.

legolas
12-17-2005, 02:10 PM
erhm was this stroke made for lazy people who get can't in position for real tennis strokes?
NO, sometimes my strokes r liek that, wtvr sooths the player

papa
12-17-2005, 06:26 PM
FiveO - we're on the same page here. Again, good post.

Marius_Hancu
12-22-2005, 12:27 PM
it is an exagerated topspin technique and should be used only sparely such as on short balls, but not as a regular shot from the baseline.

otherwise you will be paying with your wrist (and elbow), as mentioned in this article by the specialists of the French Federation:

http://www.stms.nl/june2001/artikel23.htm

check the player in Figs 1 & 2. he's doing it.

and this is the healthy technique, as shown by Fed and Hew:
Federer's and Hewitt's FH (high-speed camera clip):
http://www.araf72.dsl.pipex.com/1000FPS.mpg

I repeat the warning in the above. Use it sparely (say for short balls, approach shots), not for regular rallying from the baseline.

Check your topspin technique and don't exagerate the stress on your wrist, such as the player in Fig 1 is doing, by letting the racquet head drop too much and placing undue effort on the ulnar area (at the junction between the forearm and the palm, on pinkie's side).

I am currently helping a Futures level player with his conditioning, and he's facing exactly this problem, has related problems in his palm in that area, because of "wrapping" the ball too much in the fashion of the windshield wiping, for exagerated topspin.

He has had to take a break from the game as a result of this, and it's taking already 2 months ...

Be very careful.

Use Federer's, much healthier, technique:

Federer's and Hewitt's FH (high-speed camera clip):
http://www.araf72.dsl.pipex.com/1000FPS.mpg

Bungalo Bill
12-22-2005, 01:03 PM
I repeat the warning in the above. Use it sparely (say for short balls, approach shots), not for regular rallying from the baseline.

Check your topspin technique and don't exagerate the stress on your wrist, such as the player in Fig 1 is doing, by letting the racquet head drop too much and placing undue effort on the ulnar area (at the junction between the forearm and the palm, on pinkie's side).

I am currently helping a Futures level player with his conditioning, and he's facing exactly this problem, has related problems in his palm in that area, because of "wrapping" the ball too much in the fashion of the windshield wiping, for exagerated topspin.

He has had to take a break from the game as a result of this, and it's taking already 2 months ...

Be very careful.

Use Federer's, much healthier, technique:

Federer's and Hewitt's FH (high-speed camera clip):
http://www.araf72.dsl.pipex.com/1000FPS.mpg

I am surprised his elbow isn't having issues. Two people I know have had to get surgery and needless to say, they dont torque the racquet up the back of the ball no more.:)