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cptobvious_619
09-09-2006, 07:50 PM
in regards to serve returns, is a open(ex. 16x19) or a closed (ex.18x20) better for serve returns?

same question goes for head size (mid, midsize, oversize or doesn't matter)

also, can the flexibilty of the racquet effect the return?

does anyone have any suggestion for stable/solid racquets for me to demo, or can recommend some way to make a racquet more stable?

also, i'm a 3.5 player, with a non-attacking game (counterpuncher) who goes to net on short balls. i'm hoping to play for my college team this year, and hopefully in 6 months, i can make a transition from 3.5 to 4.0, or at least be close to it.

kchau
09-09-2006, 07:51 PM
w/e agassi uses LOL

os, dense.

bluescreen
09-09-2006, 07:56 PM
this is pretty pointless. why do people think a certain racquet is gonna help u return better? unless u use a 135 sq. in. rocket launcher the racquet doesnt matter. its about technique. focus your time and money on lessons to improve your return game instead of on racquets to do the job for u.

and dont go by what agassi uses. thats like saying if u use a racquet w/ a 90 (or 88) sq. in head and a 16x19 pattern u'll hit forehands like roger federer. things just dont work that way.

cptobvious_619
09-09-2006, 08:01 PM
my return of serve is the best part of my game. i do better recieving than serving. mostly because my serve isn't that big. my first serve ranges from (70-80 mph), while my 2nd serves are like (50 mph) i get by with mostly placement. :) i don't put a lot of emphasis on power in my game.

the reason i'm asking this question is because i made a big jump from h.s tennis to college tennis. ppl here are clocking like 100-110 mph (something i'm not used to) i can make contact with the balls, especially 2nd serves that i can take on the rise, but my racquet doesn't feel very stable, as one time, it was blasted out of my hand.

maybe i'm not asking the right question. maybe i should be asking about ways to make the racquet more stable...

Nar57981
09-09-2006, 08:25 PM
If your not fealling solid on your returns, then go for a more forgiving frame (dare i say Babalot ><). I like the TFeel 305, very forgiving frame, with good power, and room for lead tape.

Also what racquet are you using?

cptobvious_619
09-09-2006, 08:56 PM
right now, i'm using a rd ti-80.

it's been a great racquet for the time that i've had it, but i'm gearing my game towards focusing on my strengths - my return game.

Nar57981
09-09-2006, 08:59 PM
can you post specs? i don't know that racquet ><

cptobvious_619
09-09-2006, 09:04 PM
i'm using the yonex rd ti-80.

-it has a 98 head
-weights about 12.1 ounces
-7 points head light
-standard length
-16x19 string pattern

for more accurate specs, go here:
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCYONEX-TI80.html

iamke55
09-09-2006, 09:06 PM
Use nsix-one
Add weight if needed
Hit returns with it

Nar57981
09-09-2006, 09:08 PM
again i'd try the TFeel 305, with some weight to make it more like your old racquet.

bluescreen
09-09-2006, 09:17 PM
the reason i'm asking this question is because i made a big jump from h.s tennis to college tennis. ppl here are clocking like 100-110 mph (something i'm not used to) i can make contact with the balls, especially 2nd serves that i can take on the rise, but my racquet doesn't feel very stable, as one time, it was blasted out of my hand.

maybe i'm not asking the right question. maybe i should be asking about ways to make the racquet more stable...

u need a heavier racquet then. either change to a heavier players frame or add lead to your current racquet.

foucapoI
09-09-2006, 10:35 PM
IMO, the most important two aspects of a frame for good returns against heavy serves are stiffness and weight--more flexible and heavier racquets are better in general. In fact, these racquets belong to counterpunchers' category. Being said that, PS 6.0 95 has been the best return racquet for me.

drakulie
09-10-2006, 12:02 AM
It depends what kind of serve you are returing:

For flat serves you want a Babolat.
For slice, a Dunlop.
For topspin, Wilson,
and for Kick serves a Head.

AlpineCadet
09-10-2006, 12:10 AM
It depends what kind of serve you are returing:

For flat serves you want a Babolat.
For slice, a Dunlop.
For topspin, Wilson,
and for Kick serves a Head.

you must be joking.

cptobvious_619
09-10-2006, 08:21 AM
u need a heavier racquet then. either change to a heavier players frame or add lead to your current racquet.

i thought 12+ ounce racquets were players frames...

if i were to add lead to my racquet, where would i put it? most ppl say the 3 and 9 positions - does that apply here?

btw, my current racquet has no lead on it.

couch
09-10-2006, 08:29 AM
It depends what kind of serve you are returing:

For flat serves you want a Babolat.
For slice, a Dunlop.
For topspin, Wilson,
and for Kick serves a Head.

For all those serves combined you want to use a Volkl right Drakulie? http://lost-forum.com/images/smilies/wink1.gif

Will888
09-10-2006, 08:55 AM
It’s not the wand, it’s the magician.

lame, yes!

couch
09-10-2006, 09:00 AM
my return of serve is the best part of my game. i do better recieving than serving. mostly because my serve isn't that big. my first serve ranges from (70-80 mph), while my 2nd serves are like (50 mph) i get by with mostly placement. :) i don't put a lot of emphasis on power in my game.

the reason i'm asking this question is because i made a big jump from h.s tennis to college tennis. ppl here are clocking like 100-110 mph (something i'm not used to) i can make contact with the balls, especially 2nd serves that i can take on the rise, but my racquet doesn't feel very stable, as one time, it was blasted out of my hand.

maybe i'm not asking the right question. maybe i should be asking about ways to make the racquet more stable...

If you are using a 12 oz racquet and it's doesn't feel stable then I would say it's not the racquet. Most 12 oz racquets are pretty stable. I would say if you are a 3.5 player and trying to get adjusted to better players it will take time and probably better/improved technique. Anytime you make a big jump to better competition it takes time to adjust.

Now, if your racquet is getting blasted out of you hands that's not good. I might make another suggestion. I know most people on these boards say heavier racquets are better but they are only better for certain people. I would say try out some new racquets in the 11 oz range and see how they feel. If you are a counterpuncher and don't have a very strong serve, these types of racquets will probably help you.

If you are not that strong (which I don't know) I would think a lighter raquet with a little more punch against some of these players might help. I think Nar57981 was on the right path. Something like the TF 305, Babolat PD, Volkl Tour 8, Dunlop Mfil 300 are probably some good racquets to try. You can always add some lead to them down the road.

Hope this helps,

Couch

cptobvious_619
09-10-2006, 10:04 AM
thanks for the advice.

by trying out 11 ounce racquets, do you think that i should look into the category of tweeners?

yeah...going from h.s level tennis to college level tennis was a big jump. ppl here have really huge serves and are really strong off the ground. at first, it was really hard to recover from attacks on short balls and slice/kicks outwide, but now, i can at least make contact with the ball, and make them hit at least one more shot.

i'll look into some 11+ ounce racquets.

oh yeah, you were rite to assume that i wasn't that strong. i'm 5'6, about 125 lbs. the only reason i can keep up is because of my movement, which i need to work on...(but that's another thread. ;) ) my practice match with the number 4 seed (the power player of the team) was crazy - i was on the defense the entire match. i used two first serves on 40-15s, because my 2nd serve was getting smacked around.

thanks

couch
09-10-2006, 10:37 AM
by trying out 11 ounce racquets, do you think that i should look into the category of tweeners?

Yes. Just do some searching on TW and you should find some nice sticks to try. As I mentioned, the Pure Drive seems to be very popular as does the Dunlop 300 series.

It might take you a little time to get used to them but it might be worth it in the long run. I would think these types of racquets would offer you some more power and a little more maneuverability on returns, etc.

Good Luck,
Couch

Zets147
09-10-2006, 10:47 AM
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpage.html?PCODE=MTLX10
Best racket for returns period.

drakulie
09-10-2006, 10:58 AM
For all those serves combined you want to use a Volkl right Drakulie? http://lost-forum.com/images/smilies/wink1.gif

LOL, that's right!! :)

cptobvious_619
09-10-2006, 11:03 AM
thanks a lot.

a couple of racquets i want to demo:

-pure drive
-npro open
-dunlop 300g os
-rdx300

any addition input would be appreciated. :D

couch
09-10-2006, 11:15 AM
thanks a lot.

a couple of racquets i want to demo:

-pure drive
-npro open
-dunlop 300g os
-rdx300

any addition input would be appreciated. :D

Looks like some good choices to start with. Not sure about the 300g OS but based on what you've said it might be worth trying. I'm not a real big fan of OS racquets but that's just me.

I would also try to Tecnifibre TFeel 305, and maybe some of the Volkls in the 11 oz range. The Volkl V1 has been a good all-around racquet for many years. Go with the midplus version of the V1.

nViATi
09-10-2006, 11:22 AM
i'm using the yonex rd ti-80.

-it has a 98 head
-weights about 12.1 ounces
-7 points head light
-standard length
-16x19 string pattern

for more accurate specs, go here:
http://www.tennis-warehouse.com/descpageRCYONEX-TI80.html
Work on your returns it's not the racquet. If the racquet is being twisted and hit out of your hand you are not hitting the sweetspot!

nalbandian_fan
09-10-2006, 11:25 AM
I would at least try some weight at 3 and 9 o clock on your current frame in order to improve your returns. I added about 10 grams at 3 and 9 on my fischer pro no. 1s, and that made my returns much much better, as I made the jump from 14s to 16s. I feel that the weight helps me and the racquet hold ground better and make a more stable solid return. I'm not sure how you'll feel about more weight on your racquet, but I would at least give it a try before you go buy another lighter racquet. No use spending 100+ bucks on a new racquet when a 3 dollar pack of lead tape might do the trick.

couch
09-10-2006, 11:40 AM
No offense cpt obvious, but guys, he's only 5' 6" and 125 lbs. Do you think adding lead to a 12+ oz racquet is going to help him? I agree that the racquet will definitely be more stable but it doesn't matter if the guy can't swing it.

I also agree that technique is a lot more important than the racquet but don't you think there is a point of diminishing returns with the size of the person and the weight of the racquet? Something with the weight of a sledgehammer would be the ultimate in stability but if you can't pick it up off the ground to swing it, it really doesn't matter how good your technique is.

Try the demos you mentioned and see how they feel. If they don't work, they don't work, but I think you'll be pleasantly surprised. And just for kicks, add some lead to your current stick and see how that feels too.

cptobvious_619
09-10-2006, 07:32 PM
i put a little bit of lead tape on the 3 and 9 position of my racquet and it made it feel a lot more stable. (another added bonus was that my volleys seem to have a little bit more behind them :D)

however, this was only after a hitting session with one of my friends who was drilling me with that one drill where someone serves from the service line. i'm going to set up a hitting session with the number 4 seed and see if he isn't busy.

i'll keep you guys updated.

thanks for all the help. much appreciated.

oh yeah. you were rite. haha. the little extra weight did initially shock me, but after like 20 minutes of the drill, i didn't really notice. i guess i should work on fitness now more...maybe it'll help me achieve a little bit more pop behind my shots.