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csb
09-12-2006, 07:22 PM
I have been reading several reviews on the TW website and it seems that almost every racquet that weighs over 11 oz. is geared toward a 4.0 plus player. I am about a 3.5 but to me anything under 11.5 seems too light for me . Am i missing something?

The Dampener
09-12-2006, 07:42 PM
No. You're not. The nrtp ratings are the worst way to match a racquet to a player. You're better off choosing frames with specs that match what you're looking for, then demoing those frames.

Besides, look at the players out on the courts. You'll see 4.0 players using "3.0" racquets and vice versa.

AJK1
09-12-2006, 08:39 PM
Yeah, i tend to agree, but i suppose they need to have some form of guidance relative to a players ability to wield a particular frame. I still think the swing ratings that HEAD use are the best, because i feel that a player can determine much easier what sort of swing length and speed they have, rather than what NTRP rating they are. From what i've seen, using the NTRP, most people on these boards over-rate themselves anyway.

snoflewis
09-12-2006, 08:56 PM
I have been reading several reviews on the TW website and it seems that almost every racquet that weighs over 11 oz. is geared toward a 4.0 plus player. I am about a 3.5 but to me anything under 11.5 seems too light for me . Am i missing something?

there are 3.0s who are wiry thin and there are 3.0s that are really built and strong. it's just a matter of what you can handle and what you cant.

cmanxx
09-13-2006, 12:16 AM
I just started playing so according to TW i need a 8oz 125 sq. in :)

Duzza
09-13-2006, 12:19 AM
I just started playing so according to TW i need a 8oz 125 sq. in :)
and some extra cash. say 100 more?

spaceman_spiff
09-13-2006, 12:30 AM
No. You're not. The nrtp ratings are the worst way to match a racquet to a player. You're better off choosing frames with specs that match what you're looking for, then demoing those frames.

Besides, look at the players out on the courts. You'll see 4.0 players using "3.0" racquets and vice versa.

Yeah, those recommendations aren't always good. My mom can't play with anything under 12 oz, but my regular hitting partner (probably a 4.5 if he lived in the US) uses a racket that's only about 10 oz strung. It's all down to personal preference.

I remember someone on here saying his daughter would stuff a tennis ball in the throat of her junior racket because the extra weight made it easier to swing, which made him rethink what kind of racket to buy for her.

Just try a few rackets of various weights to see what type of weight feels best for you. Then, you can demo several rackets that have the weight you are looking for to find that perfect match.

AlpineCadet
09-13-2006, 02:03 AM
Yeah, those recommendations aren't always good. My mom can't play with anything under 12 oz, but my regular hitting partner (probably a 4.5 if he lived in the US) uses a racket that's only about 10 oz strung. It's all down to personal preference.

I remember someone on here saying his daughter would stuff a tennis ball in the throat of her junior racket because the extra weight made it easier to swing, which made him rethink what kind of racket to buy for her.

Just try a few rackets of various weights to see what type of weight feels best for you. Then, you can demo several rackets that have the weight you are looking for to find that perfect match.

just a thought from what i read about your post, and this has nothing to do with flaming what you wrote or what you had to relate to the topic: a child smart enough to manage the thought of an added tennis ball to a throat of a racket to increase stability is smart enough to ask for a new racket, especially when the ball inside the throat of the racket will most likely fall out after the racket makes contact with a few decently hit tennis balls.

:confused: though the story seems likely because the internet is always filled with honest answers and stories.

spaceman_spiff
09-13-2006, 03:12 AM
just a thought from what i read about your post, and this has nothing to do with flaming what you wrote or what you had to relate to the topic: a child smart enough to manage the thought of an added tennis ball to a throat of a racket to increase stability is smart enough to ask for a new racket, especially when the ball inside the throat of the racket will most likely fall out after the racket makes contact with a few decently hit tennis balls.

:confused: though the story seems likely because the internet is always filled with honest answers and stories.

The story was here in the TW forum somewhere. The parent had bought a light junior racket and then spotted his daughter occasionally stuffing a ball in the throat. I think the dad was planning on getting her a new racket anyways and the added weight thing made him rethink what type of racket to get. Still, I'd have to track down the original post to confirm.

fielders_80
09-13-2006, 06:46 AM
actually i recall that story as well.

AlpineCadet
09-13-2006, 06:54 AM
oh, i'm totally sure it's totally true because everyone recalls reading it. like totally, dude. ;P

frekcles
09-13-2006, 07:08 AM
True story. No BS.

Here's the link:
http://tt.tennis-warehouse.com/showthread.php?t=112746&highlight=daughter

See post #13

Anyway back to the OP's question:
I'm about a 3.0/3.5 (self-rated). On good days I can play with heavier/higher sw racquets (LM Prestige, Ncode Six-one 95, Dunlop Rev. Tour Pro, etc) but some days I'd rather play with lighter racquets (LM Radical, Ti Radical, etc).

Use whatever suits your game or whichever feels comfortable for you on that particular day. Don't tie yourself to just one racquet because you'll get frustrated and will just compound your mistakes with more mistakes.

Hope that helps.

Good luck.

sigep1967
09-13-2006, 07:10 AM
That was my story and yes it was true. She now plays/hits with a 11.75 oz racquet when she plays. she started with a 9.8 oz I believe. While hitting with her one day she had taken a tennis ball and stuffed it in the yoke of the racquet when I asked her why she told me it is easier to swing. So I gave her one of my racquets and as the say the rest is history.

spaceman_spiff
09-13-2006, 07:30 AM
That was my story and yes it was true. She now plays/hits with a 11.75 oz racquet when she plays. she started with a 9.8 oz I believe. While hitting with her one day she had taken a tennis ball and stuffed it in the yoke of the racquet when I asked her why she told me it is easier to swing. So I gave her one of my racquets and as the say the rest is history.

Thanks for chiming in. I knew it was only a matter of time.

BTW, my friend's young son actually hits better with an old ProStaff Classic I gave him (strung really low) than with his junior racket. The only problem is fatigue, but it's a good workout. Also, it makes him look like a more serious player, being only about 8 but having a beat-up classic racket.

AlpineCadet
09-13-2006, 11:16 AM
I stand corrected, it MUST be true!:rolleyes:

raiden031
09-13-2006, 11:27 AM
I'm trying to figure out the mystery of racquets myself. I'm a 3.0 player who greatly wants to improve in tennis, and when I find that a racquet is recommended for 4.0+ players, I don't know what to get from that. It must mean that the racquet is good because good players use the racquet. So if I want to get better, why would I limit myself to a racquet that is not good for advanced players (ie. a racquet recommended for beginner to intermediate) when I want to become an advanced player. Does it seems logical that if I want to become a 4.0 player, then I should play with a 4.0 racquet?

I have been playing with a 115" head and I have a very difficult time controlling my shots because I like to hit it hard. I just ordered a 92" racquet online but haven't played with it yet. I'm curious to know if it will worsen my game since I'm not a 4.0 player.

Janne
09-13-2006, 11:47 AM
raiden031: My bet is that it´ll be hard to find the sweetspot most of the time since going from a 115" to a 92" seems like a rather big change. Though I may be wrong and you might immediately notice an improvement in your game! Good luck, enjoy your new racquet once you get it and please tell us if the transition was easy or not!

anirut
09-13-2006, 12:13 PM
Raiden: A smaller head will make you concentrate on your shots more. You'll find it a very good teacher. Once you learn to coordinate your shots, you'll find it easy to control, but may be tiring over long periods of play because you will really have to swing it well.

A big head will help you "play lazy" with more margin for errors and less tiring as big heads are usually more powerful than small heads, so you won't have to swing that hard.