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Hot Sauce
09-12-2006, 08:24 PM
I just played a friend today for the first time. His style of play is more to wait for the opponent to make mistakes, which I did. I lost 6-1, 7-6, 6-4.

I shot far too many into the net, and long. What should I do differently if I find this happening alot?

Also, I try to play at least 2-3 times a week, but my usual playing partner is much worse than I am, so I find it hard to tune up on my skills, since he can't even hold up a good rally.

When I played against my cousins who can hit really hard, it forced me to hit hard back, so that day I was killing the balls in rallies. It seems like some days my forehand & backhand are excellent, and my serve is weak, and vice versa depending on who I play against. Is this normal?

Frenchie
09-12-2006, 08:30 PM
Topspin is your friend. When faced with hard hitting opponents, stand farther back and remember to bend your knees. As far as having on and off days, we all have them.

looseswing
09-12-2006, 08:36 PM
I just played a friend today for the first time. His style of play is more to wait for the opponent to make mistakes, which I did. I lost 6-1, 7-6, 6-4.

I shot far too many into the net, and long. What should I do differently if I find this happening alot?

Also, I try to play at least 2-3 times a week, but my usual playing partner is much worse than I am, so I find it hard to tune up on my skills, since he can't even hold up a good rally.

When I played against my cousins who can hit really hard, it forced me to hit hard back, so that day I was killing the balls in rallies. It seems like some days my forehand & backhand are excellent, and my serve is weak, and vice versa depending on who I play against. Is this normal?

I agre with Frenchie that you should use some more topspin and not go for the kill unless if you have got the angle or a shot of yours is really on. Against hte counterpuncher types you have to work the point to get the put away. Sometimes I have heard that hitting right to them is effective because they like moving from side to side.

It is also common for certain shots to be on while others are off. That just means you need practice, like the rest of us. I would say if you find this in a match do the obvious and just play your strengths and go from there.

HyperHorse
09-12-2006, 09:41 PM
You do any off court training?
howz your drop shot, topspin lob combo?
answer these questions and the Master will get back to u!!!
*wink* :-P

Bagumbawalla
09-12-2006, 10:35 PM
You have the new guy who is consistant, the usual guy who is not so good, and the cousins who hit hard.

This is a good mix. Plenty of variety.

I assume you are a younger player, and with a younger player the temptation is always to try for too much, too soon,

Learn patience from the consistant player. Keep the ball in play any way you can until you have a short ball, or angle, or open court-- then take your shot.

With the hard-hitting cousins, just have some fun, try different things, experiment with your shots.

With the player who is not so good, allow him to work on his game. Help him get better. Hit the ball back (near) to him at a medium pace, let him get the feel of a good rally. If you play a game, hit at a medium pace. Practice moving the ball around the court. Eventually, he will get better and it will work out better for you, as well.

Good luck,

B

snoflewis
09-12-2006, 10:45 PM
i would just recommend that you keep playing matches and whoever you lose to, just rally w/ them so you get used to their shots....if it's your serve that's hindering your game, just work on that w/ a bucket of balls

Hot Sauce
09-12-2006, 11:16 PM
In replies, I'm not too good at topsin and I'm using a head which has a dense stringing pattern. The guy I played against today could return almost anything I put at him, especially my serves which normally are effective against other opponents.
To Frenchie: I managed to keep him far back, and I was thinking of drop shotting, but my drop shot is definitely the weakest part of my game, I'm terrible at it.

To Hyperhorse: My drop shot, topspin lob combo is horrendous, because I have no drop shot game at all, except for the occasional forehand slice that sometimes works.

To Bagumbawalla: You're absoloutely right. I watch the pros, like Federer play and I wanna play just like him! And as far as the "usual guy", his hits are very inconsistent in a way that he could have some shots that are normal forehands, some with good topsin, lots that hit the net, and some that are so bad they fly up out of the court.

To snowflewis: I find that a lot of people that I play with don't have the stamina that I have when practicing and rallying. I've played some days for 6+ hours, and I've never gotten bored or significantly tired. But you're right, I definitely should just keep playing matches and rallying which is probably what I'm going to aim for when playing from now on.

HyperHorse
09-12-2006, 11:36 PM
Sir, what is your location?

Talon
09-13-2006, 12:58 AM
Advice for the playing agaisnt the guy who returns everything: approach the net. Usually if a guy is consistent his shots are not very powerful, so they have weak passing shots and are easy to volley against. If the person lobs you, try doing a better approach shot. It is hard to lob sucessfully when your on the run. Also being at the net intiminates your opponent, making them make more errors then they normally would.

chess9
09-13-2006, 02:06 AM
I've found that if you cannot beat a low level pusher it is because you can't hit hard consistently and lack effective aggressive shots. In short, if winning is more important than developing your game, then you need to hit well within yourself, i.e. at a pace that you can always control. You should always start your matches at about 60-80% of full throttle (a pace you can control being full throttle) and move the pace up slowly. Noobies need to do this without fail. Better players can sometimes get away with coming out hammering IF they are playing down, but even so, starting slowly is advice the pros follow.

-Robert

OrangeOne
09-13-2006, 02:22 AM
If your regular practice partner isn't as good as you wish, change some things up to work on some weaknesses. If they have a weak serve, step in a lot, which will give you less time and "make thier serve seem faster". If your volleys need work, force yourself to approach off anything and everything to get the practice, etc etc. There's always something you can work on, it just may require you to be a bit creative.

andyroddick's mojo
09-13-2006, 02:29 AM
to cut down on unforce errors and hit more winners this is what you do. say you have a nice semi-floating shot that lands short, and you feel the urge to kill it. if its really short then go for it, but if its behind the service line and a little lower, then don't kill it but hit an agressive shot back, but not all out, then follow it in for an easy volley. This is what federer does a lot of the time. most players will want to kill that first shot, but since its not as easy as they think, they hit an error. for federer, instead of making that error on a hard shot, he hits another hard shot back to his opponent, so that he can move in and easily claim the point by putting away the volley. You have to know when to go for it, and when to just wait another rally.

WayneCM
09-13-2006, 02:47 AM
I play a couple of consistant guys... Jus stay in the point And mix up your shots... If ur not as strong on top spin hit it long and deep, some slices work him side 2 side then approach the net... I can't finish shots, no real big shot 2 do it with so i have the point played out in my head...

I will either serve out wide and work them side 2 side and rush the net, serve and volley r kick into the body and drop the ball short...

Hot Sauce
09-14-2006, 08:49 PM
Sir, what is your location?

I'm in Canada

mahouFuji
09-14-2006, 10:40 PM
play with angles its not bout hittin hard o course its great if u can but...