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View Full Version : Would you buy a used racquet?


kem
09-13-2006, 08:33 AM
The racquet I was considering buying just popped up locally for sale. Fair price, he said used for about a week, 8/10 condition. Few minor scuffs, already strung. Any reason I shouldn't buy it? I wouldn't mind saving some $$, but I can certainly afford it new.

Just wanted to see what everyons thoughts are.

thanks

wyutani
09-13-2006, 08:37 AM
dude, if its still good enuf to hit a tennis ball. buy it. why not? it saves money right? anyway, what is the racquet you're buying? avoid if the racquet is a W-line.

Zets147
09-13-2006, 08:41 AM
Inspect it carefully, watch out for cracks and junk you don't want. If it pass the test, get it.

tarheels2323
09-13-2006, 08:41 AM
Yea. I've bought/traded for three racquets on the boards already and I honestly couldn't tell that two of them weren't new (the third, a Pro Staff St. Vincent, was described as 8/10 condition so I knew what I was getting, though to my delight it was probably higher condition wise). My transactions were excellent due to the great people I was making them with. If you can, get pictures and make sure the seller has some positive feedback so you don't get ripped off.

johnkidd
09-13-2006, 08:44 AM
I actually prefer to find a racket used. I like the feel after they have been hit with for awhile. Back when I was coaching I used to by my players Wilson Pro Staff 6.1's because they all said they felt dead and I like dthe way they felt.

Sebastien
09-13-2006, 08:45 AM
Yes buy it and save some $$$
Scratches don't affect the playability of the racket, but watch out for cracks.
If you buy new, you will scratch it anyway (at least I do).

Advice: Try to use the scratches as an excuse for getting an even better price.

Tennis Man
09-13-2006, 08:47 AM
I actually prefer to find a racket used. I like the feel after they have been hit with for awhile. Back when I was coaching I used to by my players Wilson Pro Staff 6.1's because they all said they felt dead and I like dthe way they felt.


ditto. I love used racquets.

netman
09-13-2006, 08:59 AM
Definitely buy used and follow all the good advice above. I buy and sell used racquets constantly.

Buying directly from someone is great because you can see it and test it before you buy. Also I have found the folks here on the TW boards to be very trustworthy and typically conservative in their condition ratings. On the big auction sites its more of a gamble. You can tell from the description whether the seller really knows tennis racquets or is just a junk dealer trying to move stuff they picked up at a yard or estate sale. Either way though, as long as you buy from highly rated sellers, you will do fine.

Use common sense and you will rarely get burned. If a deal looks to good to be true, 99% of the time it will not be what you want.

-k-

frekcles
09-13-2006, 09:21 AM
All of my racquets were bought as "used". I've never purchased a new racquet. Well, not yet anyway. Buy with confidence from members here. Just remember to check for references and ask a lot of questions before sending the funds.

Good luck.

LuckyR
09-13-2006, 09:37 AM
I am going to disagree here. Most racquets have an approximate 2 year life span (before the fibers inside have enough breakage where the stick starts to feel "mushy") the outside of the racquet can look perfectly fine. For all you know it is anywhere from 50 - 150% gone before you hit the first ball. Racquets aren't that expensive and you only need two.

One exception would be if you know the original owner well and you know he hardly played with it, just disliked it I guess it would be OK, especially for your second racquet.

diredesire
09-13-2006, 10:40 AM
The only gripe i have about used racquets is that it's hard to find in the same grip size, and most manufactuers are **** poor at keeping racquets in or even NEAR the same weight/balance. If you buy more than one, buy them as many as possible at a time. I've found yonex, fischer, and volkl to be exceptionally good at tolerances. I've bought fischer frames on various occasions, and they were all within 1g, and 1 point balance. I had a pair of dunlops which were fairly closely matched.. (fairly close) and I bought a third... It was 6-8g different, and the balance point was a full 6 points off.

As far as whether to buy used or not, i say go for it! I haven't paid more than $45 shipped for any of my main frames for years. I do collect frames, and have gone up to $85 recently for one.

Ripper
09-13-2006, 10:46 AM
I am going to disagree here. Most racquets have an approximate 2 year life span (before the fibers inside have enough breakage where the stick starts to feel "mushy") the outside of the racquet can look perfectly fine. For all you know it is anywhere from 50 - 150% gone before you hit the first ball. Racquets aren't that expensive and you only need two.

I have yet to see any scientific evidence of this. And, even if it were true, I'm sure 2 years of normal use is, almost, like nothing to a raquet. I use a discontinued model of raquet and I've managed to get a couple of new ones, but most of them were bought used; from lightly used to beaten up. And you know what? They all play the same! I'm sensitive enough to feel differences in small string tensions; so, I think I'd feel the difference, if it existed. I know some people here have reported feeling differences, but, well, I'm reporting that I haven't... Buy used raquets with all confidence, as long as they're in good condition; as simple as that.

LuckyR
09-13-2006, 10:57 AM
I have yet to see any scientific evidence of this. And, even if it were true, I'm sure 2 years of normal use is, almost, like nothing to a raquet. I use a discontinued model of raquet and I've managed to get a couple of new ones, but most of them were bought used; from lightly used to beaten up. And you know what? They all play the same! I'm sensitive enough to feel differences in small string tensions; so, I think I'd feel the difference, if it existed. I know some people here have reported feeling differences, but, well, I'm reporting that I haven't... Buy used raquets with all confidence, as long as they're in good condition; as simple as that.


Well, if you got a "beaten up" stick and liked the feel of it from day one, then maybe you like the feel of it, that's great. If you are using a "players" racquet (you didn't mention the make) it is probably pretty flexible anyway (for control), so the difference in feel between a "mushy" flexible stick and a new one, may be undetectible to you.

Some folks have never bought used and are expecting a "like new" feel, they may be disappointed.

I assume you are familiar with material fatigue, so your "scientific evidence" comment baffles me.

TripleB
09-13-2006, 11:00 AM
I wouldn't buy it...all the good shots may have already been used out of it ;)

I just wouldn't because there could possibly (probably not) be minor cracks that aren't visable. If you buy it new at least there's a warranty that goes with it.

TripleB

Exci
09-13-2006, 11:02 AM
If truly used for a week and there are no cracks: get it.

Used longer than aprox. 6 months? Reconsider. I like the crisp and accurate feeling of a new racquet, but a lot of the board members here apparently disagree. Though I must add, I like really stiff racquets to give me the crisp feeling to it..

Oh and as for saying that one is unable to feel difference between a two year old racquet and a new one is like saying that one us unable to feel the difference between stiffness in a racquet. I am very sure that before my Pure Control cracked it felt nowhere near as crisp and 'tight' as a new one. The racquet is about 2-3 years old, just cracked recently and in a way softened up before that, so I do believe you can tell the difference. I am discussing very stiff racquets here, not sure if I can feel the difference with my old flexy Dunlop to be honoust, but I can definitely feel the difference with those stiff Heads and Babolats..

Ripper
09-13-2006, 12:04 PM
so your "scientific evidence" comment baffles me.

Well, what baffles me is your "2 year life span" comment (well and the 150% thing, too ;) ). Seriously. LuckyR, I'm not saying that it doesn't happen. Or that it does, for that matter. But 2 years? Come on! That's what the raquet companies want us to believe. But, the truth is, the materials they're using are too good. Take the light bulb, for example. Everyone knows light bulb companies could make light bulbs that last 20 times more. But that would ruin their business. A light bulb is a light bulb. They all do the same thing. But raquets, these days, are required to do many things. Raquet companies are delivering the goods, but, by doing so, have created themselves a problem. How do they get us to, constantly, buy raquets. Well, they have 2 ways of achieving this. One is "inventing" all these new technologies. Two is by spreading out this myth... or by highly exagerating a fact, if you prefer.

joe sch
09-13-2006, 12:13 PM
I would not buy a new technology racket used, unless it was not used much, thus close to mint, and even then its hard to know how much structure stress damage may have been imparted by a possible big hitter. The new rackets, are just too brittle (hard, light, stiff) and dont last like the thick beamed graphite rackets of the 80s and early 90s

AlpineCadet
09-13-2006, 12:18 PM
I would not buy a new technology racket used, unless it was not used much, thus close to mint, and even then its hard to know how much structure stress damage may have been imparted by a possible big hitter. The new rackets, are just too brittle (hard, light, stiff) and dont last like the thick beamed graphite rackets of the 80s and early 90s

:confused: Is there proof to this, or is it just a feeling?

Ripper
09-13-2006, 12:18 PM
Hummm, now that I think about it, it's good for me that people think their raquets are garbage after 2 years.

;)

brucie
09-13-2006, 12:44 PM
nah i like them broken in. imho

TonyB
09-13-2006, 01:24 PM
I am going to disagree here. Most racquets have an approximate 2 year life span (before the fibers inside have enough breakage where the stick starts to feel "mushy") the outside of the racquet can look perfectly fine. For all you know it is anywhere from 50 - 150% gone before you hit the first ball. Racquets aren't that expensive and you only need two.



Where are you coming up with this nonsense??

I've been playing with my old Yonex R-22 graphite racquet since the mid-1980's and it plays beautifully. And I hit the ball damn hard, too. I played with that racquet through both high school AND college. I can't even count how many dozens of times it's been restrung. And I just played with it last night, as a matter of fact. Never had a problem.

2-year life span? What a joke.

Exci
09-13-2006, 01:48 PM
Well, what baffles me is your "2 year life span" comment (well and the 150% thing, too ;) ). Seriously. LuckyR, I'm not saying that it doesn't happen. Or that it does, for that matter. But 2 years? Come on! That's what the raquet companies want us to believe. But, the truth is, the materials they're using are too good.

Then how do you explain that these newer (the stiffer) racquets tend to break, crack or detoriate probably within these 2 years? If you consistently bash balls with some decent amount of spin and pace, it WILL detoriate noticably within two years, considering STIFF racquets.

:confused: Is there proof to this, or is it just a feeling?

Both feeling and proof in the sense that my local shop has a Babolat RDC reader and the number that indicates the stiffness decreased over time. Last time I checked was about a year ago and compared to new, even then it already dropped in RDC rating.

Where are you coming up with this nonsense??

I've been playing with my old Yonex R-22 graphite racquet since the mid-1980's and it plays beautifully. And I hit the ball damn hard, too. I played with that racquet through both high school AND college. I can't even count how many dozens of times it's been restrung. And I just played with it last night, as a matter of fact. Never had a problem.

2-year life span? What a joke.

Can I ask you where you got your blatant ignorence from then? Consider this: how stiff is your 1980's R-22? Probably nowhere near the 69-71+ ratings of the current generation of racquets. Do you refuse to see that the argument applies to the stiffer racquet generation? Of course you never had a problem. My old Dunlop never showed a crack either, though my Babolat cracked after aprox 2 - 3 years. Babolat does not exclusively have to deal with this; my friend's Wilson Hyper Hammer cracked way before my Babolat on a forehand, locals at my club cracked several liquidmetals at the throat, particularly the LM Instinct, and my local shop told me once that the Liquidmetals were a real pain as people kept returning them with a cracked throat.

Expand your horizon and understand that in order to create these stiff racquets, the materials and composites are pushed to their limits, especially on court where the material has that much stress to deal with. Racquet companies DO have a reason why they resort to graphite composites with kevlar, liquidmetal, zylon, etc, to increase the stiffness compared to a full graphite 1980's plushy racquet.

ERGO, DON'T EXPECT THEM TO HAVE THE SAME CHARACTERISTICS OF AN OLD FLEXY RACQUET!

louis netman
09-13-2006, 01:55 PM
I would not buy a new technology racket used, unless it was not used much, thus close to mint, and even then its hard to know how much structure stress damage may have been imparted by a possible big hitter. The new rackets, are just too brittle (hard, light, stiff) and dont last like the thick beamed graphite rackets of the 80s and early 90s

Although mfg tolerances have certainly improved due to technology, newer frames have a higher percentage of fillers and resins that breakdown more rapidly than good ol graphite...

AlpineCadet
09-13-2006, 03:23 PM
Although mfg tolerances have certainly improved due to technology, newer frames have a higher percentage of fillers and resins that breakdown more rapidly than good ol graphite...

I'm sad to even consider this to be true, and if it were actually true, I'd be even more of a sad sight. Say it ain't so. I'd hate to have to buy a new racket every few years, since I play 3 to 4 times a week.

:confused:

onkystomper
09-13-2006, 04:25 PM
BUy it.

I bought a 2nd hand babolat pure storm & a new babolat pure storm

the 2nd hand one is going strong & im loving it

the new one snapped after about 5 mins and has gone back to the shop

joe sch
09-14-2006, 07:33 AM
:confused: Is there proof to this, or is it just a feeling?
Yes !
I dont have the current durability metrics but in my observations from many players, rackets are being replaced at very frequent rates these days, they stress fracture and crack often within the 1st year with big hitters. The older rackets would last years ...

This is a board where people express opinions based on experience and that is what I do ;)

haerdalis
09-14-2006, 09:17 AM
I have experienced this with a few golfshafts so it certainly could be true with a tennisracquet too but it would probably not be as noticeable.