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cgtennis10
09-13-2006, 05:58 PM
How do you hit normal groundstrokes on low balls. I play people who hit the ball higher who are much better and play better against them than I do against a lower player who hits the ball low to the net with little spin?? Thanks

tennis_hand
09-13-2006, 06:24 PM
Lots of choices.

1. top spin to get it over.
2. drop shot if he is far away.
3. slice.

looseswing
09-13-2006, 06:41 PM
Just get down lower and you should be able to hit your normal stroke.

Bagumbawalla
09-13-2006, 06:55 PM
Looseswing is correct. When you get a low ball and stroke through it with your normal stroke, the very act of hitting up and through the ball gives it enough topspin to clear the net and dip back into the court quite nicely.

Yes, you can hit them hard and the stay in.

oddy
09-13-2006, 07:46 PM
yeah, you can really drive these low balls and have them still stay in. my coach was feeding me a bunch of low balls to my backhand the other day to force me to drive the ball harder and with a ton more topspin.

lzclzclzc
09-13-2006, 08:41 PM
well it really depends on how low it is and wat kinda of backhand u have.
i would prefer slicing it if it is too low

Will888
09-13-2006, 09:21 PM
bend your knees and if you can try to hit the ball at the pinnacle hight.

Ten.Is
09-13-2006, 09:21 PM
I hate those low balls. When I play my friend all his shots are freakin low (he's a pusher by the way) and when this happens I tend to just slice it if its towards my backhand or just go with my normal forehand stroke if its to my right. One thing, i think is important is to bend your knees more than normal and get low on the ball.

oddy
09-13-2006, 09:51 PM
yeah, the knee bend is essential. while doing those drills, my rear knee would almost scrape the ground every now and then.

Narcissist
09-14-2006, 03:39 AM
I have huge difficultly with low bouncing serves. Serves hit flat with pace on a fast surface that just stay around knee height are horrible.

maverick1
09-14-2006, 07:11 AM
If the ball is less than 1 foot high, I slice it. I get best results when I don't worry about the racket hitting the court. In fact this is one of my most consistent strokes; the slice is always flat and low over the net. I have much more trouble slicing a ball at regular height. They tend to sit up or sail long.

I think it is impossible to hit topspin against ball that bounces less than a foot. I don't care if Federer says he can do it. He is not smarter than Newton.
To hit topspin, your racket must be moving up brushing the back of the ball (or moving forward along top of the ball, but we can rule this out for a low ball); the upward speed of the racket WILL BE zero at its lowest point. You need a certain amount of vertical distance to accelerate the racket from 0 to a meaningful speed. This kind of room just doesn't exist when you are hitting a foot above the ground. The racket itself takes up 6 inches from the sweet spot to the lower edge. Sometimes when I try topspin off a low ball, it hits the bottom of the frame, goes high and bounces fairly high on the other side, and is pretty effective at my level, but I doubt the pros want to do it.

LuckyR
09-14-2006, 07:24 AM
How do you hit normal groundstrokes on low balls. I play people who hit the ball higher who are much better and play better against them than I do against a lower player who hits the ball low to the net with little spin?? Thanks


You don't mention your grip type but I can guess that it is Western or at least Semi-Western. If so, I don't have a lot of advice for you (since I'm the guy hitting you all the low shots!).

joe sch
09-14-2006, 07:37 AM
The more advanced players can adust grip more towards eastern and flat blast back. The simpler alternative is to slice them back and this is also accomlished better with the same grip shift. It is also preferable to close your stance since you will have more control of these types of hits going more classic ...

limitup
09-14-2006, 11:14 AM
A foot off the ground is pretty darn low - I would try my best to either move forward or back and catch it somewhere else. All you need is another ~6 inches or so and you can really rip it with topspin (at least I can w/ a SW or Western grip)

Rickson
09-14-2006, 08:11 PM
How do you hit normal groundstrokes on low balls. I play people who hit the ball higher who are much better and play better against them than I do against a lower player who hits the ball low to the net with little spin?? Thanks
Open the racquet face. Too many people are stuck on keeping a square face or a slightly closed face, but against low balls, the face should be open. Get used to switching grips as well because it's easier to open your face with an eastern forehand grip than with a full western grip. Personally, I use an efh grip when I play against slicers who love hitting low balls because it's easy to hit with an open face when using the efh.

mahouFuji
09-14-2006, 09:36 PM
just hit it deep and if u feel its a good shot come up net wait for another low shot to come up there.. u gon kill it

Juksosah
09-15-2006, 08:03 AM
These $?##%& low (below 1 foot ) (and slow) balls just demand more footwork and positionning I think.

When I get that short, low, mid-court dead ball i know my next shot will be a low percentage one.

If someone is able to hit a good offensive shot with a high % of sucess then tell me your secret.

At my level (2.5) it pays to hit these. You'll get a weak reply... but you feel like being a pusher.

maverick1
09-15-2006, 09:11 AM
Those of us who have trouble with low short balls are at least in good company.

I just started reading Brad Gilbert's "Winning Ugly". He says he figured out how to beat Aaron Krickstein when on the brink of losing to him. Kricktein had a monster forehand from the baseline, but if Gilbert hit one short and low to the forehand with no pace, krickstein could only send a weak reply which Gilbert could drive to the backhand corner and take the net.

I think the first thing to do is respect these balls. Just because they are short and slow, we think they ought to be put away, and we overhit.

The second thing is that going for a low net clearance is less risky on low, short balls than it is with higher balls from the baseline.

Third thing is not to try to hit topspin. either slice it or hit almost flat.

With these in mind, I think you can take a pretty good swing at the ball and it will stay in

Juksosah
09-15-2006, 02:06 PM
The second thing is that going for a low net clearance is less risky on low, short balls than it is with higher balls from the baseline.

I still think it's way more risky (for me) to hit this shot than a topspin shot from the baseline having a lot of net clearance.

And having a SW grip isn't helping me because I need to open up the racket (to go eastern) and I had a lot of problems in the past with balls sailing long

Most of the time I end up not switching my grip. And feeling uncomfortable with my positionning.

If I had a better footwork, I for sure would improve a lot.

Bagumbawalla
09-15-2006, 03:14 PM
Every day, here, we have people writiing, I can't hit balls that are too low, too high, too slow, too fast, with too mush spin, too flat, lacking pace, too short, too deep...

What do you expect-- that they just hit the ball back to you just the way you like it.

If you game is complete, if you know all the basics-- there is no shot that you should not be able to handle (unless you are playing way out of your league).

Get back to the basics. Become more consistant and there is no shot that you can't handle. Really.

Ten.Is
09-15-2006, 10:11 PM
Every day, here, we have people writiing, I can't hit balls that are too low, too high, too slow, too fast, with too mush spin, too flat, lacking pace, too short, too deep...

What do you expect-- that they just hit the ball back to you just the way you like it.

If you game is complete, if you know all the basics-- there is no shot that you should not be able to handle (unless you are playing way out of your league).

Get back to the basics. Become more consistant and there is no shot that you can't handle. Really.

Instead of coming onto the thread and critizing people; why not give your 2 cents? This section is called "TENNIS TIPS/INSTRUCTIONS" if you don't want to hear people talking about problems they're having with their tennis game, how about not reading the thread?

GhostLigre
09-16-2006, 10:11 PM
Every day, here, we have people writiing, I can't hit balls that are too low, too high, too slow, too fast, with too mush spin, too flat, lacking pace, too short, too deep...

What do you expect-- that they just hit the ball back to you just the way you like it.

If you game is complete, if you know all the basics-- there is no shot that you should not be able to handle (unless you are playing way out of your league).

Get back to the basics. Become more consistant and there is no shot that you can't handle. Really.

That's really bad...I mean the reason why this thread exists is to help people who have trouble with an aspect in their game. And believe it or not, the advice people give work. People don't start playing tennis knowing how to do everything. So even basic stuff like hitting balls with different pace, spin, and height, which experienced players think is basic, may not be so easy to a member of this forum who has just begun how to play and is searching for advice. So.

Usually I slice back. It's extremely hard to topspin such a low ball because you'll be framing most of the time attempting to try to get under such a low ball. Your racket will just smack against the court in trying to topspin it. Just slice it back and be sure to slice it DEEP and high over the net.

thursdayisgod
09-17-2006, 02:48 PM
Just last friday I worked with my coach on this. Typically I like to slice the ball back when it's low like that, typically with a little side spin and send it to the backhand side of my opponent off my forhand, so that the ball spins outside of the court. This, along with the other corner, were my only options to a low ball, so he taught me what he referred to as a "buggy-wip."

It's similiar to the save shots of Sampras or Federer, they have no power behind them, only topspin and rather than following through over your opposite shoulder, you follow through on the same side of your body with extremely fast headspeed. It's kind of like Nadal's typically forhand.

I highly recommend working on it. It was very difficult at first to break the habit of following through a forehand on the opposite shoulder, it'll take a lot of practice to build the muscle memory to do it consitantly, but having the variety makes you a far better player.

cgtennis10
09-17-2006, 04:33 PM
thanks to everyone for replying..... excepet Bagumbawalla

th41291
09-17-2006, 06:34 PM
They talk about how western/semifull western is bad for low balls, but i can snap my wrist on those low balls for topspin drives better than i've seen semi-westerners do, i hit them better than high balls...any comments?

limitup
09-17-2006, 10:38 PM
Yeah I have 0 problems with low balls with my SW/W grips. I actually have more problems with high balls believe it or not. I think more than anything it has to do with the fact that I practiced a lot against a wall (for 100s if not 1000s of hours) but still, I don't see what's so hard about low balls lol. A lot of it must have to do with whether you have a more flat or low to high stroke. I can do both, but it took awhile to learn how to hit flat after hitting against a wall for 100s of hours.

maverick1
09-18-2006, 04:07 AM
I think more than anything it has to do with the fact that I practiced a lot against a wall (for 100s if not 1000s of hours) but still, I don't see what's so hard about low balls lol.

I usually find wall very boring and unrealistic; balls come at you too quick and low. I have generally avoided it.

But until you said the above, I didn't put two & two together. I have a problem with low balls and the wall gives you plenty of low balls. I will practice...

ubel
09-21-2006, 03:04 PM
I usually find wall very boring and unrealistic; balls come at you too quick and low. I have generally avoided it.

But until you said the above, I didn't put two & two together. I have a problem with low balls and the wall gives you plenty of low balls. I will practice...
That's probably why I enjoy low balls a lot. I'm so used to them, I can pick them up with ease and put an insane amount of power and ample topspin in them because of the practice. High balls/moonballs have always given me trouble because the amount of practice I get with them against a wall = 0 :\

chunlimeyers
09-23-2006, 05:45 AM
Thank you all!!!.. even Bagumbawalla, for, without his s___ talking, maybe the solution would not have been posted!.. haha However, I get it!.. I don't have problems with "pushers" or "counterpunchers", I have problems with LOW BALLS!.. And, that wall idea is IDEAL!.. And, also, my thought is we all have a tendency in practice to hit the balls we want to hit and only hit balls that are "nice" or easy. I am also thinking "tiger woods", as he can CRUSH a low ball!.. Maybe I simply ain't letting it drop "low enough" to get proper leverage on it to crush it. With enough practice these evil pushers will all go down, and then i can only play "valid tennis".. or, force them to do so when my low ball return isn't 10mph, but 85 coming at them! Sure U pushers and counterpunchers will chime in and say ur way is valid. But U don't make it up to the big leagues, so just admit what U are, CHEESE! Thanks again all for allowing my tennis game to continue.

Tennismastery
09-23-2006, 07:44 AM
Here are a couple additional thoughts on your low-ball delemma.

If the ball is very low, you won't be able to get your racquet below the ball (without hitting the ground!) enough to hit up the back of the ball for topspin. If you open your racquet face and lift, you will be limited because you won't have topspin, only upward trajectory...so you will only be able to hit the ball softly or very close to the net, so you don't hit it long. Without the topspin, this ball is totally 'gravity reliant'...(hitting a ball only hard enough to clear the net, but not so hard that gravity can bring the ball back down before going out.)

Slice allows you to hit with a bit more firmness, but has the same limitations due to being still a gravity reliant shot. But, being able to convert pace to spin by hitting with slice, will allow you to hit with a more aggressive swing without resorting to 'dinking' the ball to keep it in.

You can hit a topspin on a very low ball by changing the swing path. If you swing more parallel with the net or baseline on a low ball, brushing up in this manner, you can hit a pretty good topspin off a low ball. However, this usually requires players to use a less aggressive grip, usually an eastern to maybe a semi-western. A full western grip is too closed to do this. We see a lot of pros now hitting this shot with the verticle finish. (Also called a 'reverse forehand' as Robert Landsdorp first called it, I believe!) Thirty years ago, we called it the 'buggy whip' since it resembled a person cracking a whip from below the waist (as if sitting in a high buggy seat!)

Finally, remember, if you don't have a shot, then don't force a shot you can't hit often. Watch how often Federer simply slices a low ball back and waits for a better ball to attack. The key, of course, is to keep such balls deep so you don't open the door for your opponent to attack you from this more-or-less defensive type shot.

Hope this adds some light to this topic.

odessa
09-23-2006, 11:24 AM
I believe advanced players can hit low slice balls that are one foot high.

But you have to drop the racket significantly below the hand, sometimes the racket head is pointing straight down to ground and contact is made at around a 45 degree ankle (between hand high and ground).

This way you can either hit an topspin approach shot or a high topspin moonball which is not easy to slice back low.

Actually that is a good drill : one partner is hitting only slice backhand and the other is hitting only inside out forhand topspin.