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View Full Version : How to return drop serve down the T


Ryoma
09-13-2006, 08:36 PM
I played a guy tonight with some kind of a drop shot 2nd serve. It's really hard to deal with when I was returning on the deuce court.

I tried the following shots:
1. Inside out backhand chip/slice - There is not much angle or pace and return to opponent's forehand.
2. Run around and hit forehand crosscourt with lots of spin - Again, there is not much angle to work with and will return to opponent's forehand.

Any other suggestion?

drakulie
09-13-2006, 09:15 PM
drop shot back.

Zets147
09-14-2006, 06:44 AM
Get closer inside the baseline and create your own pace.
In other words, smack the .... outta the ball.

Geezer Guy
09-14-2006, 06:47 AM
drop shot back.

Agree.

After you do this a time or two he'll start rushing in to get your (anticipated) drop shot return. Then you lob over his head.

LuckyR
09-14-2006, 07:21 AM
Tell us more about this serve. Is it a true drop shot or is it just shorter than you anticipate with lots of backspin? Any wild side spin?

Bagumbawalla
09-14-2006, 03:13 PM
The answer to a question like this, in many ways, depends on what you are capable of.

Basically, if he did this to you once, he might have caught you off guard-- twice.... well you never expected him to do that, again.

Beyond that, you have to expect it, stand in closer or run in. You know how it's going to bounce from experience. Be there ready to hit it back.

You have several choices, now.

If it bounces high enough-- you're there-- put it away-- pop it into the open court. Yes, that close to the net, there will be plenty of open court.

If it's low-- half volley (or use a shortened swing) and hit it as deep as possible and come in behind it.

Or, drop shot right in front of you and hold your ground.

Or, flick it for an angle and follow behind it to cut off a return.

If you have trouble executing any of these strategies... then you need to work on your overall stroke production and court coverage. This should not be that difficult a serve to return. It is the serve of a player who is not very good.

Catalyst
09-14-2006, 04:09 PM
Agree.

After you do this a time or two he'll start rushing in to get your (anticipated) drop shot return. Then you lob over his head.

Isn't it funny how by playing someone elses "lesser" style, you're forced to resort to similar pusher tactics? Perhaps that's what the best do, only to a different degree, they try to turn their opponents into pushers.

lol.

-D

Ryoma
09-14-2006, 08:27 PM
If it bounces high enough-- you're there-- put it away-- pop it into the open court. Yes, that close to the net, there will be plenty of open court.
Tried. This one I have no problem putting away. I can take it flat angle or flat deep crosscourt.

If it's low-- half volley (or use a shortened swing) and hit it as deep as possible and come in behind it.
Backhand half volley to a high part of the net = low percentage shot!
Run around to hit a forehand half volley = low percentage shot!

Or, drop shot right in front of you and hold your ground.
Tried, the opponent doesn't have to be good, all he need to do is hit right at me. Then, it's all down to reaction time (or luck) - the player with less skill gain advantage.

Or, flick it for an angle and follow behind it to cut off a return.
Tried, a high percentage shot will be top spin deep crosscourt. The problem is I will be too close to the net to block the down the line return (or down the line/mid court lob), I will be forced to hit a backhand overhead. - again the player with less skill gain advantage.

If you have trouble executing any of these strategies... then you need to work on your overall stroke production and court coverage. This should not be that difficult a serve to return. It is the serve of a player who is not very good.

I have no problem executing any of the above shots, what annoy me is how a drop serve have so much advantage...

Kaptain Karl
09-14-2006, 08:45 PM
"Drop Serve????" Please explain this a little more.
What level are you?
What level is he?
Is he serving underhand on this serve?

- KK

mahouFuji
09-14-2006, 09:36 PM
lob it give urself time to reccuperate

Ryoma
09-15-2006, 08:11 PM
My level is 3.5 and moving my way to 4.0.
A drop serve is what you may call a dink serve.
If it bounce higher than the net, I got a clean winner on both deuce and ad court.

On deuce court, I will hit a crosscourt angle flat shot.
On ad court, I will sneak around and hit an deep inside out winner.

The most difficult is those that doesn't bounce as I mentioned in the scenario above.

andrew_b
09-16-2006, 05:49 PM
My level is 3.5 and moving my way to 4.0.
A drop serve is what you may call a dink serve.
If it bounce higher than the net, I got a clean winner on both deuce and ad court.

On deuce court, I will hit a crosscourt angle flat shot.
On ad court, I will sneak around and hit an deep inside out winner.

The most difficult is those that doesn't bounce as I mentioned in the scenario above.

At your level, on the serve you're having trouble with (the one with no bounce), you might try a slice (if backhand) or heavy topspin (if forehand) back deep to his backhand. Not as a winner, but just deep to his backhand side. You said his serve is down the middle, so this shot should allow you to go over the middle of the net. Follow this shot to the net. You'll get him backing up and recovering from the service motion, and if he does get it back, it should be an easy sitter for you, especially if you keep it deep.

play well,
Andrew

Coach Reed
09-16-2006, 06:30 PM
At your level, on the serve you're having trouble with (the one with no bounce), you might try a slice (if backhand) or heavy topspin (if forehand) back deep to his backhand. Not as a winner, but just deep to his backhand side. You said his serve is down the middle, so this shot should allow you to go over the middle of the net. Follow this shot to the net. You'll get him backing up and recovering from the service motion, and if he does get it back, it should be an easy sitter for you, especially if you keep it deep.

play well,
Andrew

I agree. Nick Bollettieri's academy teaches the CONTROL, HURT, FINISH philosophy.
*The CONTROL shot neutralizes the opponent.
*The HURT shot imposes mental and physical strain on the player to just get to the ball.
*The FINISH shot ends the point by hitting to a "runway" (not just a two foot by two foot area) in the open court you've created.
a key aspect of this philosophy is to keep moving forward and either hit a swinging volley or transition to the net and volley.

One control shot off of a player's serve is to return it DEEP DOWN THE MIDDLE TO THE SERVER'S BACKHAND. This is ideal with a short "T" serve and as Andrew mentioned, you can follow it in (transition to the net) and hit an angle volley (hurt shot) to get the player on the run (or win the point). If they get the hurt shot back, it will be weak and the open court will lie waiting for the finish shot (volley). Gotta MAKE the finsh shot.

Another option for advanced players who have mastered the swinging volley is to take a few steps inside the baseline after you hit the control shot, anticipate the weak return, hit a swinging volley crosscourt (hurt shot) keep moving in and hit the finish shot (usually a volley) to the open crosscourt. In order to execute you must be consistent. It also helps to take the ball early and/or at the peak of the bounce.
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Ryoma
09-17-2006, 02:37 PM
Thanks andrew_b and Coach_Reed,

I was always thinking about the court geometry without combining the position of the opponent. Returning deep down the middle to the opponent's backhand is a great idea. The CONTROL, HURT, FINISH concept is excellent.

mahouFuji
09-18-2006, 10:46 AM
i didnt think ryoma ever needed help....!??! hes better than roger federer.........

Catalyst
09-18-2006, 07:24 PM
Thanks andrew_b and Coach_Reed,

I was always thinking about the court geometry without combining the position of the opponent. Returning deep down the middle to the opponent's backhand is a great idea. The CONTROL, HURT, FINISH concept is excellent.

Sounds like some n.a.z.i motto; CONTROL, HURT, FINISH HIM!!