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View Full Version : how long before you got good at stringing?


redtennis55
09-14-2006, 05:39 PM
how long did it take to get comfortable?

steve s
09-14-2006, 05:48 PM
Five or six times. Went and watched the guy at the tennis shop.

Steve Huff
09-14-2006, 06:18 PM
Most people can learn to increase the speed at which they string over time. A good stringer is one that learns to match strings with a players needs. This takes knowing your strings and rackets (and all equipment for that matter), learning as much about a player's game as possible, then meshing everything to exceed the player's expectations.

MTChong
09-14-2006, 08:42 PM
Just two to five times, but I was still getting faster from five to ten; but I was at the state - after two-five frames - where I felt really comfortable stringing.

Nar57981
09-15-2006, 02:10 AM
Define good...i can string whatever well and won't make any mistakes...but i lack speed

redtennis55
09-15-2006, 10:27 AM
Define good...i can string whatever well and won't make any mistakes...but i lack speed

Well just how long it took you to get comfortable using your machine.

diredesire
09-15-2006, 10:45 AM
Well just how long it took you to get comfortable using your machine.

Well that's a difference from being "good." I was comfortable with my machine probably around my 4th job. I think being "good" at stringing is a lot more than just getting the string into the racquets. I think those with a lot of experience will realize that there's a lot to being a competent stringer, like Steve Huff said. Unless a ton of reading is done before you even start stringing, it's pretty doubtful you're going to be "good" before your first 20-40 string jobs. I guess I say that because i've gotten quite a few jobs under my belt, and i can reflect on experiences gained :P

yourserve
09-15-2006, 10:45 AM
i have strung a couple hundred racquets in the last two years. i still would not classify myself as good. i have alot of repeat customers, but i am intelligent enough to know that far better stringers are out there. but none of them happen to live in my town.

netman
09-15-2006, 05:09 PM
Its not really that hard. If you can play tennis with any skill at all, you can string a racquet. Took me 3 tries to string a frame in under 1 hour on a low end drop weight. I could do it faster but I'm too darn meticulous for my own good. :)

-k-

fastdunn
09-15-2006, 05:22 PM
Most people can learn to increase the speed at which they string over time. A good stringer is one that learns to match strings with a players needs. This takes knowing your strings and rackets (and all equipment for that matter), learning as much about a player's game as possible, then meshing everything to exceed the player's expectations.

Hmm,.. this takes time, I realized. You have to experiment with lots
of strings and you have to have decent understanding of the inner
work of tennis game....

vbtennis99
09-15-2006, 05:42 PM
it took me about 15-20 racquets untill i got comfortable at stringing. Now.. it takes me like 30 min

A Defenseless Creature
09-15-2006, 06:11 PM
It takes at least 200 racquets to get really good. You need to develop a routine, get it smooth and exact so that your technique will allow you to produce CONSISTENT results with each and every stringing. Not until you develop this consistency will you be able to be considered "good" at stringing.

dancraig
09-15-2006, 08:42 PM
I think I remember a post on here somewhere that said there was a big tennis stringing operation that didn't allow new stringers to touch a customer's frame untill they had done 300 racquets. They got the 300 by doing demo frames.

MTChong
09-15-2006, 08:54 PM
Most people can learn to increase the speed at which they string over time. A good stringer is one that learns to match strings with a players needs. This takes knowing your strings and rackets (and all equipment for that matter), learning as much about a player's game as possible, then meshing everything to exceed the player's expectations.

Definitely with you on this one - fortunately, I started stringing and frequenting these boards at the same time while simultaneously trying various string set-ups to be able to give an experienced say on different types of strings. I work at Sport Chalet and would consider myself the only reputable stringer in my store - maybe another one, but I haven't seen him string. I also know a good amoun about racquets and technique, form and strings, so people come in every now and then and ask about certain things - I help them out; they leave happy. It's good all around because I love talking about tennis or helping people with tennis.