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jonolau
09-22-2006, 07:39 AM
My friend has a racquet with a thick 28mm straight beam. He regularly hits the ball in the upper hoop (top 4 strings) and comments that he feels a lot of vibration coming through to the handle. He also strings his racquet at a very low relative tension.

Would stringing it at a higher tension eliminate some of this vibration?

Kevo
09-22-2006, 08:53 AM
No. He should try to learn to hit the sweet spot. He could also try a longer frame. Lowering the string tension might help, but then when he hits the sweet spot it would be launched into orbit. Any hit outside the sweet spot is going to cause more vibration. That's just the nature of the thing.

Ripper
09-22-2006, 09:18 AM
He should try to learn to hit the sweet spot.

Bingo.

Jerry Seinfeld
09-22-2006, 09:27 AM
Stringing higher will only serve to increase vibration and shock. I would suggest proportional stringing as that will serve to help soften the outer areas of the stringbed and reduce some of the shock/vibration he is experiencing.

mucat
09-22-2006, 11:46 AM
My friend has a racquet with a thick 28mm straight beam. He regularly hits the ball in the upper hoop (top 4 strings) and comments that he feels a lot of vibration coming through to the handle. He also strings his racquet at a very low relative tension.

Would stringing it at a higher tension eliminate some of this vibration?

I sometimes have the same problem, low tension string and I have more mishit then I like and I use a OS :shock:.
My theory is, because of the low tension and high power, when I swing hard on topspin strokes, I have to swing more low to high to compensate for the high power generated by the racket. Sometimes with too much low to high action, the steep angle of the swingpath will cause the racket frame to touch the ball. Increase 1-2 lbs of tension should adjust the swingpath to less framing in this case.

andrew_b
09-22-2006, 11:49 AM
I agree with the "learn to hit the sweetspot" concept, however, I can relate because until I switched to a 27.5" frame, I hit very consistently slightly high in the frame (about an inch above where the rackets sweetspot was).

One thing that may help is to place some weight on the frame on each side of the head where he typically hits the ball, say around 10 and 2 o'clock. This should help stretch/move the sweet spot out and reduce the vibration. Of course, he has to be able to handle the increased static and swing weights if he does this....

play well,
Andrew

Valjean
09-22-2006, 11:58 AM
My friend has a racquet with a thick 28mm straight beam. He regularly hits the ball in the upper hoop (top 4 strings) and comments that he feels a lot of vibration coming through to the handle. He also strings his racquet at a very low relative tension.

Would stringing it at a higher tension eliminate some of this vibration?
Your friend's stringer should check the frame for some visible imperfection like a crack. If it's sound, tell him/her to at least lower the tension some on those top four strings. There's even a technique out there called proportional stringing that does that throughout the frame.

scotus
09-22-2006, 03:09 PM
Try Babolat Racquet Vibration System. It only costs $3.99 and does a really good job at reducing frame shock and vibration, just as it claims.

Ever since I sustained an arm injury, I never play without one.

OrangeOne
09-22-2006, 03:22 PM
The top four strings.... that's not just outside of the sweet-spot - that's beyond it completely! I think a technique issue should be addressed? Just my humble opinion.

Does your friend break a lot of strings? I know when I catch stuff up there (especially on large swings for hard serve-returns), I've often cost myself a set of strings...

snoflewis
09-22-2006, 03:38 PM
hitting the top for crosses is pretty high....and like others have said raising tension won't help at all. there are people who hit higher up on the string bed...but top 4 crosses is just absurd imo. the only reason why i would see hitting the top as a benefit would be better control and spin...which in this case can be improved by just switching to a poly and hitting the sweetspot.

jonolau
09-22-2006, 04:57 PM
Guys,

Thanks for all your helpful replies and input. This chap has laid off tennis for 4-5 years and only returned to it about 4 months ago. He is currently experiencing TE and thought that the vibration was causing it.

I purposely left out the details above to get more objective views and all your replies confirmed my own thoughts. He should not be hitting so high, and his TE is possibly coming from the long tennis layoff as he is now trying to overhit the ball, thus stressing muscles which had been laying dormant for many years.

I'm his stringer and will be stringing it up with Alpha Gut 2000 18 to give him some comfort, whilst advising him to work more on his technique.

Once again, thanks for all your helpful replies.

Jon

LoveThisGame
09-22-2006, 06:33 PM
Ultimately he needs to address the cause (by technique and frame) and not the symptoms (through lower tension, softer string).

Windshield wiper forehands don't provide a good chance for consistency in the string contact point and often cause hitting near the tip, particularly off towards the shoulder. This makes for players using wwf and poly, which can shear under this stress, to have unusually high string breakage.

Valjean
09-22-2006, 07:34 PM
Wait, now. If the man is getting good results, I fail to see how he should be wanting to make some major change in his game or change his racquet just to rid himself of shock (likely his true complaint) or vibration because he hits high on the racquet's face. That's overkill, and an unlikely outcome.