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View Full Version : Experimenting with tension


cys19
09-27-2006, 09:37 PM
Let's say I get my racquet strung at optimum (medium) tension, say 60 for example, from TW, but I want more power. So would I have to pay g0lfsmith, for example, and get it done at 58? And then if I don't like 58, I want 56, wouldn't that cost a bit of money?

andrew_b
09-28-2006, 04:24 AM
That's why many players who like to keep fresh strings in their frame adn to also adjust their tension, string type, etc, string their own rackets. For a minimum investment of about $200 you can get a very basic stringer.

play well,
Andrew

steve s
09-28-2006, 07:07 AM
You may gain a little power, but you lose a little control.

Jesse K.
09-28-2006, 07:18 AM
I've recently decided to start stringing myself just for a couple of those reasons. I easily spend $100 about every 6 weeks on racquet stringing. Not to mention the don't do the best job...

andrew_b
09-28-2006, 07:36 AM
I've recently decided to start stringing myself just for a couple of those reasons. I easily spend $100 about every 6 weeks on racquet stringing. Not to mention the don't do the best job...

Even if they do a decent job, tension at a fine level (within a pound or so) is so dependent on stringing style - where you clamp, how you tie off, prestretch each string, etc etc etc.

If you don't do it yourself, it's hard to know exactly what you'll get, even if it's not a "bad" job. Unless, of course, you stick with one specific stringer (person, not store/shop), then it's a little easier.

play well,
Andrew

jackson vile
09-28-2006, 10:03 AM
You may gain a little power, but you lose a little control.


Depending on how much you use spin, and how hard you hit

TonyB
09-28-2006, 02:10 PM
I just recently got back into playing after a multi-year (almost multi-decade) layoff. All the strings are completely different now, and with all the multifilament and co-poly types out there, I realized it was going to take a while to find the right string. So I bought a stringing machine.

I've already strung 6 racquets on the machine, and at $30 a pop for a string job from my local pro shop(if not more), and a 30-minute drive to the shop (each way), I figure that the machine will have paid for itself by the end of the year.

I plan on getting into stringing racquets for other people at the local club starting next year, so that will make the investment even more worthwhile.

You're right, trying to find the right tension for a particular string can take a while. And by paying for 2 or 3 string jobs just to find that tension (if you're lucky), you'll already be halfway to paying for a basic dropweight machine.

Something to consider.