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pmata814
09-30-2006, 10:18 PM
This might sound like a stupid question but I'm new to stringing and I would appreciate your help. I'm strining my Prince Tour Diablo MP 16x18 pattern. I'm doing 2-piece. I start my crosses over then under but on the next cross down I have to start under then over otherwise I'll end up with up with all the unders and overs parallel to each other on the two crosses. Is this OK or am I doing something wrong? I string my crosses from left to right, by the way, because I learned on a head racquet and that's what the diagram indicated. I don't know if this is standard procedure for all racquets though. Thanks in advance.

Midlife crisis
09-30-2006, 10:55 PM
This might sound like a stupid question but I'm new to stringing and I would appreciate your help. I'm strining my Prince Tour Diablo MP 16x18 pattern. I'm doing 2-piece. I start my crosses over then under but on the next cross down I have to start under then over otherwise I'll end up with up with all the unders and overs parallel to each other on the two crosses. Is this OK or am I doing something wrong? I string my crosses from left to right, by the way, because I learned on a head racquet and that's what the diagram indicated. I don't know if this is standard procedure for all racquets though. Thanks in advance.

If your first cross starts inside of the outermost main, which is typical of almost all racquets, then you will have to do as you describe. You need to string the crosses so they are opposite of the one above it, no matter whether or not that string goes over or under the first main string it crosses.

There were some racquets that had offset holes for the mains, in which case you'll need to follow the manufacturer's instructions for using either hard or soft crosses.

pmata814
09-30-2006, 11:05 PM
...There were some racquets that had offset holes for the mains, in which case you'll need to follow the manufacturer's instructions for using either hard or soft crosses.


First of all thanks for replying.

What are "offset holes" and "hard" or "soft" crosses. Does "hard" crosses mean over/under and "soft" under/over?

Steve Huff
09-30-2006, 11:38 PM
No. You shouldn't worry about such things yet. It will come. Keep getting on stringing forums to get used to the jargon used.

It doesn't matter on that racket whether you start over/under or under/over. Some rackets with staggered holes require a certain way to start.

String your first 2 crosses. Clamp them off. Now, string the 3rd string. That was (mildly) a hard weave. After clamping the 3rd string, weave the 4th and 5th crosses, and leave enough string in the loop between them to reach your tension head. Tension, clamp off the 4th. Pull the 5th cross through to get ready to tension it. But, before you tension it, weave the 6th cross. See how much easier it is to weave when you weave 1 string ahead of what you're going to tension. This is a "soft weave".

Hope this helps.

Midlife crisis
10-01-2006, 12:25 AM
First of all thanks for replying.

What are "offset holes" and "hard" or "soft" crosses. Does "hard" crosses mean over/under and "soft" under/over?

As Steve says, this is probably not worth worrying about, and I only mentioned it in case you had one of these racquets. On a racquet with offset mains, some of the main strings will be higher than the others. A "hard" weave is one where the cross strings go over the higher mains, and so take a much more up and down path. A "soft" weave goes under the higher mains and over the lower mains, so it takes a much straighter path.

If your mains are all on one plane, just go ahead and string it up maintaining the alternating weave for the crosses, and you'll be fine.

CheapStrings
10-01-2006, 03:29 PM
Since you are new, here's one tip: start your crosses so that the last weave on the opposite side is an "over". It makes it much easier/faster to put the string through the target grommet.

Usually this means that the first weave should be "under" but sometimes due to skipped holes it needs to be an "over" (you'll everntually see when). If you don't understand this terminology or you end up with your last weave under, don't worry. This is just a technique you "try" to do. Most times just start your weaves "under" and you will end up with "over" on the last weave.