2hbh On The Run

Discussion in 'Tennis Tips/Instruction' started by PeppermintMocha, Oct 18, 2009.

  1. PeppermintMocha

    PeppermintMocha Rookie

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    Coaches, or people who've received extensive quality coaching...

    What is the proper way to prepare to hit a 2hbh ON THE RUN?

    For example, with forehand, as soon as I realize I'm getting a forehand I switch to my fh grip as I turn my shoulders; I have my racquet back and the non hitting hand out (usually pointing at the incoming ball). And I can do all this while running to the ball so when I get to the ball I'm prepared to hit a proper forehand. I also won't feel unbalanced as I have my both arm out.

    But what about backhand??? If the ball is coming to me I know to turn my shoulders, take the racquet back with the racquet head drop slightly and the buttcap point at the net before I take a swing. But what if I have to run to the ball?? I feel awkward (unbalanced, even) running and holding the racquet like that. Should I just run first, stop, and then prepare for my backhand take back?? This is why my backhand is all messed up under pressure.

    So what is the proper way to prepare to hit a 2bhb on the run?? Some key tips for this player who's still learning??
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2009
    #1
  2. Nellie

    Nellie Hall of Fame

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    I think that you can see from this video of Nadal that most 2hbh move sideways prior to bringing back the racquet, and then prepare for the shot once they get close to the ball's expected position.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CnfsKxLkWlM&feature=related

    It is awkward to run with the racquet back. Instead - you would be moving with big steps to the desired point and then start to prepare and set up with little steps. You can really tell a professionals movement from this (moving to be at the ball well before it arrives and then using the little steps to setup even better).
     
    #2
  3. split-step

    split-step Professional

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    That vid you posted is not a backhand on the run. That is him moving to a backhand setting up, stepping into the shot and hitting a backand.

    The second backhand Nadal hits in this clip is a running backhand

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1E8W3Olri9s

    Either way, your backhand prep is still the same. you change grip turn your shoulders as you move to the ball. However the real takeback for the swing occurs as you prepare to load the leg you will be pushing off of.

    Same as the backhand hit right to you
    .
    (Should be mentioned some pro players e.g Venus Williams runs with her racquet back as she moves to the ball. As long as you have the timing, you should be fine)

    The most important thing about running shots is your footwork.
    Don't make it difficult and over-analyse. Practise hitting open stance backhands and the rest should fall into place.
     
    #3
  4. LeeD

    LeeD Bionic Poster

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    Most important in a running 2HBH is to set the front foot during the entire stroke, so it doesn't move or pivot or need to be lifted. That gives you the proper hitting position to hit hard and clean.
    Two handers can prepare almost "late", but since it's two hands, it's quicker to get into strike position than a one hander.
    You can choose to go fully Western, in which case you can hit openstanced, SW which footwork works closed and open, or Eastern dominant, which like a more closed foot stance, planting the front foot for the entire swing.
     
    #4
  5. Bud

    Bud Bionic Poster

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    You may also want to try hitting the 2HBH open stance... it gives you an additional amount of time to set up. Experiment around with it... pulling your racquet back at different times as you run toward the ball.
     
    #5

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